ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
5,371 results
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

THE RANCH The Ranch Company, Publishers. PHIL. L. AXLINQ Editor Associate Editors: F. WALDEN. H. L. BLANCHARD. Office: 36 Downs Building. Subscription, In advance, one year, 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscription will be $1. Seattle subscribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and salaries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and ad dress, and all arearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration of subscription is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Failing to receive the paper regularly, you should notify the Seattle of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

4 HORTICULTURAL NOTES The Jonathan apple is receiving a great deal of attention just now. There is no question but it is an ap ple of most excellent flavor and could hardly be surpassed in color. It is not a long keeper under ordinary con ditions. But it is claimed by those who have tried it that it keeps re markably well in cold storage. These are all points in its favor. One ob jection to the Jonathan is that in some localitites it is not a prolific bearer. In former years I grew it in lowa and that was the objection there. I grew the Jonathan by the side of the Ben Davis and the latter yielded four times as many apples as the former. At that time the taste of the people was not educated in the matter of apples as it is now. I could sell my Bens for as much per bushel as the Jonathans. Of course under such con ditions it paid much better to raise the old Ben Davis. It is quite different now. Good Jonathans will sell for twice as much as the Ben Davis. This means about three times ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

I am on record as saying that peaches do not usually thin them selves. But I find that lam mistaken in that matter. We got ready to begin our peach thinning May 25, but upon examination I found that the young peacnes were dropping. So we waited and we find that fully one thousand of our trees have thinned themselves sufficiently and some of them too much. As a general rule they are just about right and it is remarkable to see how evenly the thinning is done. Hand thinning could not im prove on this work of nature. Had we begun our work a week soner we should have lost our money and many of our peaches that ought not to have come off. This teaches us the importance of knowing that we are right before we go ahead. There is an old saying that "experience is a dear school, but that fools will learn in no other." We are certainly learn ing in that school but woe to the man who would intimate that we cannot learn in any other. * * * But why did our peaches thin them selves? I don't know. ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

0 THE DAIRY Fighting the Chehalis Condensery. The milk condensery at Chehalis is haivng a rough road these days and prospects appear good for its shut ting down for an indefinite period. The trouble centers around the de cision arrived at by the company to pay but 90 cents per hundred pounds during the current month, while the price in May was $1.10 and higher in previous months. The dairymen wanted the company to pay $1.10 this month but the latter refused, saying it would shut down the factory before acceding to the demands. This con densery is a new one and the manage ment claims it has not yet been in operation long enough to have created a market for its product large enough to warrant the payment of the higher figure for milk. The claim is also made that there are now several con denseries supplying the market and that this fact is responsible for a sort of glutting of the market, taking down the price. The management also promises to pay a higher figure next month, but must r...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

the ration consisted of all skim milk. If a calf did not do well, the whole milk was continued for another week or two. The amount of milk fed was gradually increased till the calf got older. The most fed in any one day was 25 to 27 lbs. The skim milk ration was kept up until the calves were five to six months old. As they increased in age they had what water they could drink in addition to the milk. It is desirable to make all changes in the food of a calf gradual ly, so as not to disarrange the diges tion of the calf. Separator skim milk was used and in every instance it was fed fresh. To prevent it from sour ing, it was boiled by having steam turned into it, which diluted it about 8 per cent. As soon as the calves would eat, a little grain was given to them. Chopped grain was used, and it was fed dry, in a dry box, and not put into the milk. When the calves were 2 or 3 weeks old, a little hay was kept by them and renewed frequently; they soon learned to eat it. If tne calves were...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

8 HOUSEHOLD MRS. S. C. BUTCHER Commanteationi for tliis department may be sent to Mis. S. C. Butcher, Ellensburg, Wash., or direct to The Ranch. All ques tions will be carefully answered; contribu tions for publication are welcome. Seasonable Hints. When watering house plants add two tablespoonfuls of household am monia to each half gallon of water. Copperas dissolved in water, one fourth pound to one gallon, is a good disinfectant. If poured through the sink or drain occasionally it will keep it clean and wholesome. Have rubber heels put on your shoes for every day wear and you will be surprised and pleased with the re sult. The rubber acts as a cushion and relieves the nervous strain on the back. An old fashioned fly destroyer is one-half teaspoonful of ground black pepper, one teaspoonful brown sugar and one teaspoonful of sweet cream. Mix well together and place in the room on a plate. Make cushions, for every day use, of wash goods. They wear much bet ter and may be laundered e...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

LEGAL NOTES R. J. BORYKK This department is open to all the patrons of The Ranch. Inquiries on legal matters will be answered free in these columns. If a reply by letter is desired enclose a fee of One Dollar to R. J. Boryer. care The Ranch. Two questions have been lost. Will the parties please send same again? When an incomplete instrument has not been delivered it will not, if com pleted and negotiated without au thority, be a valid contract in the hands of any holder, as against any person whose signature was placed thereon before delivery. Every contract on a negotiable in strument is incomplete and revocable until delivery of the instruments for the purpose of giving effect there to. As between immediate and as re gards a remote party, other than a holder in due course, the delivery, in order to be effectual, must be made either by or under the authority of the party making, drawing, accept ing or indorsing the instrument, as the case may be; and in such case the delivery may b...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

10 POULTRY H. L. BLANCHARD rnmmu'nications for this department arc solicited. Personal experiences detailed and question! prove of great benefit. Write to 11. L. Blanohard at Hadlock, Wash., or (lit.ct to Th« Ranch, Seattle. Hatching Ducklings With Hens. IMi-s. Octavius Allen, British Columbia.) It has often surprised me that where there is a market for ducks more people do not interest them selves in so profitable an industry. It. may be that their few wants are not understood, and many believe that the idea of duck rearing cannot be enter tained unless one is prepared to launch immediately into incubators and brooder sheds. Now, where hens are to be obtained for setting, there is no doubt that they hatch a much better percentage of ducks than a good incubator; but the nest must be sufficiently large and it must be properly arranged; also the hen must be kept quite free from insects as the duck's eggs are much more easily broken than either a hen's, a goose's or a turkey's. Where j...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

Macaroni Wheat in This State. Prof. E. E. Elliott, of the state ex periment station at Pullman, in writ ing to the Breeders' Gazette, has this to say about macaroni wheat: The introduction of macaroni wheat into the grain growing sections of eastern and central Washington may not revolutionize the wheat producing industry but it certainly offers a new opportunity to growers in the dry land regions of this state. There are somp tests, however, which these newly introduced wheats must meet before they can take their place in the category of profitable crops and so far the real situation in regard to them is still undetermined. There is no question about the ability of the macaroni wheats to grow suc cessfully in regions so dry as to be con sidered unreliable for ordinary wheat production, but it has been found that many well-known varieties, when seed ed in the semi-arid sections, gradually become adapted to the unfavorable conditions and do exceedingly well. The shortness of straw of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

12 THE FIELD Maintaining Fertility of the Soil. To the farmer who has very rich land, as is the case in many parts of our state, the maintaining of the soil fertility may not seem of much impor tance, but in the course of time he will come to know how very important it is just as the New England farmer has long since learned. Many farm ers in the western states are already noticing the decrease in the yield of crops from older lands, and if better methods of farming are not resorted to, it will not be many years before the application of commercial fertili zers will be necessary. The fertility of the soil is one of the great corner stones of prosperity to the people and the wealth of the na tion is dependant upon it. We should be careful to use better methods of cultivation and return as much plant food to the soil as we take from it. The term fertile, as it is generally used, means the ability of a soil to pro duce crops. Although a soil may be rich in plant food it is not really f...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

Concerning the Cutworm To the Editor: —As a subscriber to The Ranch who has spent a little time in the study of economic ento mology I feel bound to take exception to the article with which your issue of June Ist begins: "Look Out for the Cutworm." Almost every statement therein contained is glaringly incor rect. One is used, unfortunately, to the absurdities of "newspaper ento mology," but a paper of the standing of The Ranch, which is intended for the instruction of the farmer, and which could, I suppose, at any time command the services of an official entomologist to supply information, should not publish such nonsense as that contained in the article com plained of. The writer has mixed up every kind of caterpinar which is likely to occur on a farm and con structed a life history that does not fit any of them. The "white butterfly" is the parent of the cabbage caterpillar. It passes the winter in the chrysalis state and lays its eggs in May on cabbage and other cruciferous plant...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

14 LIVE STOCK The Demand for Fall Lambs. (Henry Stewart.) The increasingly prevalent demand of the markets for what may be called luxuries, in spite of the unavoidaole extra cost of them, furnishes a ver> profitable business in the production of these choice products. Times and seasons no longer count in this respect. Hence it is worth while for all those whose conveniences permit them to engage in the production of these things, to study the conditions under which the supply of them is demanded, and met, in the markets. But it is a matter of convenient location more than anything else that controls this business. A dressed lamb put up in an attractive manner and neatly and cleanly wrapped or packed, sells on sight, while one that is carelessly dressed and shipped or exposed for sale, goes a begging for purchasers. Any one who wishes to enter this profitable business should visit a city or large town market and interview a dealer, and see for himself first what is wanted and how ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

14 LIVE STOCK The Demand for Fall Lambs. i Henry Stewart.) The Increasingly prevaleni demand of the markets for what may be called luxuries, In spite of the unavoidaole extra cosl of them, furnishes a verj profitable business in the production of these choice products. Times and seasons no longer count in this respect. Hence it is worth while for all those whose conveniences permit them to engage in the production of those things, to study the conditions under which the supply of them is demanded, and met. in the markets. Hut it is a matter of convenient location more than anything else that controls this business. A dressed lamb put up in an attractive manner and neatly and cleanly wrapped or packed, sells on sight, while one that is carelessly dressed and shipped or exposed for sale, goes a begging for purchasers. Any one who wishes to enter this profitable business should visit a city or large town market and interview a dealer, and see for himself first what is wanted and how it...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

operation and assistance of the Na tional Association of Wool Manufactur esr and upon questions before congress this will mean much. There should also be no trouble in securing the co operation of the cattlemen upon all questions where the interests are mu tual. Under the circumstances, there fore, we would unhesitatingly advise the sheepmen to stand by their own or ganization. The National Wool Grow ers' Association is now in position to accomplish practical results for the industry that can hardly be obtained in any other manner. The officers of this association are entitled to the fullest support and confidence of the flockmasters. Any other action on the part of the sheepmen must be to turn down the efforts of such men as Sena tor Warren. Can sneep interests of the country afford to take such a stand? Likes Angoras Best of All. In a late number of the Rural New Yorker J. B. Jenkins of Essex county, Mass., has this to say of Angoras: "I am a farmer in a small way compared with we...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

operation and assistance of the Na tional Association of Wool Manufactur esr and upon questions before congress this will mean much. There should also be no trouble in securing the co operation of the cattlemen upon all questions where the interests are mu tual. Under the circumstances, there fore, we would unhesitatingly advise the sheepmen to stand by their own or ganization. The National Wool Grow ers' Association is now in position to accomplish practical results for the industry that can hardly be obtained in any Other manner. The officers of this association are entitled to the fullest support and confidence of the flockmasters. Any other action on the part of the sheepmen must be to turn down the efforts of such men as Sena tor Warren. Can sneep interests of the country afford to take such a stand? Likes Angoras Best of All. In a late number of the Rural New Yorker J. B. Jenkins of Essex county, Mass., has this to say of Angoras: "I am a fanner in a small way compared with we...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

11 You Might as Well _ : r^ PPI H A [to buy a buggy with 6 wheels and 3 axles as to buy one of the "other rfffiS| *-* ctr IU c . kind" of Cream Separators. You may say that this is etched, but iT^^SL we hold to our statement that the relationship is just about the same. A 4-wheel wagon would Vf*#^. run about 20. per cent, lighter than a 6-wheel one, just the same as a TUBULAR will run 20 I |£_-~\ per cent LIGHTER than any other make. A 6-wheel wagon would need a whole lot of extra rf-'W&iw fittings on it, just the same as the "other kind" of cream separators have a lot more contrap i^ tions to themand hard to cleanse. You can follow this out to the end. People often cling C^kKjr~S ffllk strongly to old ideas, and are apt to overlook the fact that something else has come up that r^*33sL/T Mm nas back-numbered the "old idea". Look up the "Tubular" proposition of what a cream FIW fit/1 lliilt separator ought to be. We have agents in nearly all Dairying districts, or write to us for...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1904

THE RANCH vJIr^mj^^^ ■«» **&* ■o&tmk ik-Ank <J J _*» J <&<««& •l^ ' '4 *t *ssst*srf v% "4 VOL. XXI. NO. 13. HOLSTEIN-FRIESIANS-MILK AND BEEF PRODUCERS THE desire has been expressed by some of the friends of this publication for information re garding the Holstein-Friesian cattle and what they are doing at the pail. Without any desire to disparage the other breeds The Ranch will here give a few facts and figures that have been gathered from such data as was pro curable on short notice. It would be a pleasure to have those readers ac quainted with the Holsteins write some supplementary information for pub'ication in future numbers. The Holsteins are not very numerous in the state of Washington, nor in any other of the Pacific northwest states, for that matter. In Cali fornia there are several large herds and the re ports from them indi cate they are doing well in every way. There is plenty of room for a large number of pure blood Holsteins in this state, espec...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1904

2 EXPERIENCES All rabaorlbers are invited to write for this column. For oni-h accepted article we jive 30 cents, either in subscription or advertis ing, Make jrour articles brief and write as Often as you like. Fence Posts. —Peel young pine trees three feet from the ground and let them stand for one year for fence posts. You will be surprised how they will coat over with pitch, and when put in the ground they will last twenty years. The trees peel easily now. Try it. —E. Kuester, Spokane county. Draining Stack Sites.—Tn stacking hay it is well to make a back furrow along the centre, where the stack is to stand, plowing around until the open furrow is just clear of the bot tom of the stack. Then run a drain from the lower end of these ditches. You will be surprised at the small amount of hay spoiled. Repeat this operation two or three times and there will be little or no waste.—l. P. Brown. Killing Buckbrush.—To cleir land of buckbrush, rose bushes and weeds, plow it in the spring an...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1904

THE RANCH The Ranch Company, Publishers. PHIL. L. AXLINO Editor Associate Editors: F. WALDEN. H. L. BLANCHARD. Office: 36 Downs Building:. Subscription, in advance, one year, 60 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscription will be $1. Seattle subscribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and salaries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find It on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and ad dress, and all arearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration of subscription is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Failing to receive the paper regularly, you should notify the Seattle o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 July 1904

4 HORTICULTURAL NOTES The question has been asked if it is berieficial to slit the bark on growing trees. That is very doubtful. The idea seems to prevail in certain quar ters that a tree becomes bark-bound. But nature provides for that. If the bark was some dead thing then it would become too tight. Put a band of burlaps around a tree early in the spring and it will become very tight by the middle of summer. This we experience in using bands under which to catch the larvae of the codling moth. If they are put on early in the spring they become very tight by the middle of June for they do not need removing till then or later. We pin our bands on with a shingle nail as explained in these notes not long since By the time of their first taking off they become so tight that our hands have to carry pinchers with which to remove the nails. But the bark of a tree is not dead like the l^n-'s referred to. As the tree grows the bark expands in a natural way and does not become too tight. Ther...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
x
Loading...
x
x