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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1991

May 1991 Meetings on July 1 child labor law changes Because of new changes in the child labor laws, the Department of Labor and Industry will hold briefings throughout the state to discuss the updates which become effective July 1. New times and places are: May 2 2 & 7 p.m. Roanoke Roanoke Co. Admin. Bldg. May 6 2 & 7 Abingdon Dept. of Social Services May 6 7 Eastern Shore E. S. Community College May 7 7 Winchester Handley High School May 8 2 & 7 Fairfax Fairfax City Council May 9 2 Virginia Beach Dept. Social Services May 9 7 Hampton Thomas Nelson Comm. Coll. May 14 2 & 7 Richmond Henrico Co. Admin. Bldg. May 15 2 & 7 Waynesboro Fisherville Rehab. Ctr. May 22 2 & 7 Danville Danville Public Library It is important for anyone who hires children to attend one of these briefings. For more information call 804-786-8011. Mark your calendar May 2-5: 64th Annual Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival, Winchester. Five days ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1991

4 ■-sft f i I > ■ 1 Alf£ W : i> I'fc f flßßfii ft-V lPtlt ,-. * f: ; ' i -.?! 4I : , ■' i- * li * - t i| . s r > »..,, mm 111 # I # « >in«in -» I I .hiiiiiiiiii. 1 m.mining* lll "t 1 ""*' mmfiwwmi'U'HH —>'■ P |llll! ffiw'ii'! ll " nill » ll *"^^ iw^^ : *■ I i y-m ' I i ' ~ i %'' |v fo v >» M—» '*••* ■ * *i• *■ • T#« ■' Ft 1 * : I I Ik: * * 5 j 1 -•<lk k* s I■■ ; . » •' ' • i\ : 1*- k*&, fr &i 4* jK?H a Jif'ifß4i «. r * . : -"...' ..--i *» ' 1 , T | fcJ-.Hm j 1 »_ I MM H HC ° On June 1, your Virginia Farm Bureau 1000, our lowest-priced plan with compre- not call your county Farm Bureau office Health Care Program includes the new hensive benefits to protect you against major now? Your county Secretary can help you Comp 500 health insurance option. Attrac- health care expenses. decide on the coverage that fits both your tively priced, this well-rounded protection Each plan has benefits ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1991

May 1991 Scientist recalls rewarding visit with Virginia farmers BY DR. THOMAS K. KROLL Special to Farm Bureau News It's been a long time since I participated in the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Adopt-a-Scientist Program. From the day I left my host family in Virginia, I've been meaning to compose an article on the fond experiences. Unfortunately, I've not been able to find the right words or the right theme to structure my article. I considered an article on the immense knowledge that was exchanged, or the often addressed theme of the family farm, and I considered simply writing a very long thank you note. But, my inability to put my finger on what it was I wanted to say kept me from completing anything until now. And perhaps that is the story —a story on the intangible aspects of the Farm Bureau Adopt-a-Scientist Program. The exchange is designed to provide an opportunity for a "corporate scientist" to live with a farm family and gain an appreciation of the needs of the farme...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1991

6 Conference was a fresh new outlook for Young Farmers By CARL and MAXINE AREY State Young Farmers Chairmen RICHMOND—' A Fresh New Outlook." This was the theme of the 1991 Young Farmer Leadership Conference March 15-17 at the Richmond Radisson. There were eight newly organized county Young Farmer committees present at the weekend-long event. They were: Charlotte, Floyd, Grayson, Halifax, Loudoun, Northumberland/Lancaster, Nottoway and Prince William/Fairfax. We welcome all these new committees and offer our full support to them. There also were many county committees recognized for their work throughout 1990. Augusta County's Young Farmer Committee received the State Outstanding Young Farmer Committee award. Carl and Maxine Arey served as chairmen of the Augusta committee in 1990. The 1990 Most Promising New Committee award went to Campbell County, Ricky Cheatham, chairman. Outstanding Young Farmer Committee Awards for each district went to: Southside District: Campbell County, Rick...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1991

May 1991 Virginia stands ready to fill future export needs (Continued from Page 1) "Virginia's official recognition of the value of exporting and its benefits to the Virginia economy, along with a beefedup and more experienced approach to international marketing on the part of the Virginia Department of Agriculture, were major factors." In 1989-90, total agricultural exports from Virginia were $641.5 million. Virginia's leading agricultural export is leaf tobacco at $300 million, not including the export of $1.4 billion in manufactured cigarettes. Tobacco is followed by $217.6 million in general agricultural products including poultry, peanuts, fruits and vegetables; $58.2 million in processed food products; $55 million in logs and lumber; $5.2 million in livestock, livestock embryos and livestock semen; and $5 million in seafood. In these areas, the big jumps occurred in poultry exports, which were estimated at only $30 million just five years ago; logs and lumber which totaled $37...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1991

8 Pork leaner than ever and a nutritional bargain fj SHARING SECRETS with SHIRLEY This is a result of the pork industry responding to the public demand for healthful pork by producing leaner products. Pork provides many nutrients that we cannot obtain from other sources. Pork is even referred to in recent advertisements as the "other" white meat. This is because of so much emphasis on the light meat from poultry producers. Pork is indeed a nutritional bargain. Fresh pork is an outstanding source of many vitamins and minerals essential to the human diet. Pork provides high quality protein and is a primary source of other essential nutrients like vitamin 81. It is also an excellent source of vitamin 82, 86, 812, iron and zinc. With pork being as lean as it is today, one could easily enjoy it frequently. To give you an idea of how the leaner pork profile stacks up against what we used to think of as "pork," note the following facts: • In 1983, a 3 oz. serving of roast pork would yield ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1991

May 1991 Don't discount dandelions for the dinner plate By TOM and JOANNE 0* TOOLE Outdoor Journalists That much-maligned dandelion—the infernal weed that is the bane of every gardener and homeowner seeking the perfect lawn —is surprisingly cherished by many In some areas the nuisance plant is cultivated in hothouses for its leaves, which are cooked like spinach, used in salads, and served in numerous other ways. Even the roots are roasted and ground to be mixed with chocolate and coffee in beverages. Easily recognized by its bright yellow flower, the dandelion has deeplyindented leaves, and a hollow stem containing a bitter, milky juice that is not at all harmful. The dandelion is a perennial, reproduced by abundant spreading seeds. In the United States, it is plentiful on the Pacific coast, in the north central states and throughout the northeast. In Canada it is most prevalent in the eastern provinces. Yet, the hearty dandelion is generally found throughout North America— thanks ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1991

10 Extension considers cluster staffing By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor BLACKSBURG —Virginia's budget crunch has caused the Virginia Cooperative Extension to consider major changes in the way it staffs local offices. "We've heard from the General Assembly, from agricultural leaders and from our own staff that we've got to do something different," explained state Extension Director Dr. James Johnson. "We're staffed the same way we were when the organization started some 75 years ago,'' he said. One proposal being considered is a cluster approach, in which a crop specialist, farm economist, or other type of agent works out of a central office to serve entire regions instead of just one county, Johnson explained. Similar approaches have been tried with mixed results in Extension programs in the nation's Midwest. "It's felt that some people can work across county lines, and probably increase their effectiveness," Johnson said. Extension was founded as an agricultural educational outr...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1991

May 1991 ANGUS BULLS—IO-15 months old. AHIR records. Cal (703) 228-8496 or 2881 WANTED—sIow, down, or crippled cattle. Rick Lewis (804) 352-5846 or (804) 352-7352. REGISTERED OPEN & BRED Polled shorthorn females. Some with calf at side. (703) 825-0590. REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS. Excellent pedigree. Mason Angus, Hillsville, VA. (703) 236-5778. HOLSTEIN STEERS for sate. 400-500 (15 head). CaH Vivian Evans (703) 682-4457 WANTED FARM or pasture for beef cattle. Spotsylvania or Orange County. (703) 399-1208. WANTED FARM or pasture for beef cattle. Culpeper or Madison County. (703) 399-1208. SIMMENTAL BULLS, heifers and cows available. Tom Clark (703) 228-4407. Wytheville. REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS. WNI rent or sell. Box 115, Goochland, VA. 23063. (804) 784-5145. REGISTERED ANGUS BULL. 15 months, $900. Rodamachpa Farm, Amelia, VA. (804) 561-2490. REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORD bulls. Breeding age. Light birth weights. Performance records. Staunton, VA. (703) 886-1565. POLLED HEREFORD BU...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1991

_ NEWS Vol. 50, No. 4 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS May 1991 '*&£ * % §4 j»' IIrfsMWJL < ! ' MbiV */ <>?»• IfjPsk fP*wrl Iv 4 B J| v < I:,^HPI '* Wmß* % : | "Value. Their rates are competitive and help me get great value for my money. My agent helps me plan for the future with a wide range of products. Annuities, IRA's, Mortgage Cancellation, Disability Income, Whole Life ... you name it No wonder I *1 1 1 • J | S Americans from every walk of life depend ISSSSSSS on Farm Bureau Insurance." VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY EARLY SETTLERS INSURANCE COMPANY Vnu k southern farm bureau life insurance company " " SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU ANNUITY INSURANCE COMPANY What We Do Best. 200 W. GRACE ST., RICHMOND, VA 23261 804-788-1 234 I _____ _____ —] I '<■'- ■■ ' - : '>?>■'•' ,• • v.-|, . J I ■••• I I l I I |« IH I 1 1 1 I"" I cß^"^BßpK rg T3Wisi'^P |r BS 'M; , jP|(( I rS B jSIBw...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1991

Farm Bureau Vol. 50, No. J(6 Farm Bureau women hold informative luncheon for media By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor HERNDON —Northern Virginia reporters learned about farmers cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay, suburban polluters and food safety at a media luncheon April 23, sponsored by the Virginia Farm Bureau Women's Committee. For starters, the eight newspaper reporters heard urban Virginians are perhaps more guilty of abusing pesticides and fertilizers than any other group, according to a recent survey of Fairfax County residents. The 1990 General Assembly ordered Virginia Tech to survey urban Virginians on their knowledge of proper pesticide use. Of 422 questionnaires sent to a 111, ffl nA 1L » Gov. Wilder (front) introduces new Agriculture Commissioner Dr. Clinton V. Turner and Ns wife, Alvora. (Photo by Greg Hicks) Pilot counties find well tests helpful; program grows By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Editor A pilot well testing project conducted in December by six Farm ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1991

2 Processors have public gargling peanut butter Peanuts are being unfairly roasted in the press, thanks to a small faction of peanut processors interested in serving their own interests, not those of consumers. The writers doing the roasting need to dig a little deeper to find the truth about the 1990 Farm Bill's peanut program, instead of accepting the moldy peanut butter being fed to them by these few, selfserving processors. That's the warning made by two Farm Bureau marketing experts, at our Richmond office and at Park Ridge, 111., who contributed information with which I responded to a recent editorial. Peanut oil salesmen, in an effort to influence the president's upcoming decision on emergency importation of peanuts, misrepresented the position of the International Trade Commission as a recommendation to lift the ban on peanut imports. In reality, the three-man commission submitted three different recommenda- tions. One to allow importation of peanuts generally, another to al...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1991

June 1991 Mark your calendar June 7-9: Fairfax Fair. Contact Linda Bestimt, 703-246-3246. June 11: Friends of the Industry of Agriculture monthly meeting, 8 a.m., Holiday Inn Midtown, Richmond. $7. Contact Robins Buck, 804-371-6094. June 11: Christmas Tree Management Workshop, Grayson County. Contact Dr. James Johnson, Virginia Tech, 703-231-7679. June 12: Virginia Pork Festival, Greensville County Ruritan Club grounds, Emporia. Contact 804-634-6611. June 12: Fruit growers meeting at Williams's orchard, near Ben Venue, 11 a.m. Contact Thomas Williams, 703-675-3619. June 12: Christmas Tree Management Workshop, Prince Edward County Contact Dr. James Johnson, Virginia Tech, 703-231-7679. June 15-16: American Kennel Club Herding Clinic, Frying Pan Park, 2709 West Ox Rd., Herndon, Va. Covers changes going into effect July 1. Contact David Russell, 203-938-9305. June 16: Father's Day at the Farm, Maymont Children's Farm for dads and kids, ages 2-12, with games and special events. Call 804...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1991

4 Dairy month reminds shoppers that milk's a bargain *•* fIP SHARING SECRETS with SHIRLEY J Milk is processed, homogenized, fortified, and yet is not a fabricated food. Milk is an excellent source of nutrients, especially riboflavin and calcium. Seventy-six percent of the calcium in the U.S. food supply is found in milk and milk products. When shopping for a bargain, you have purchased 16 cups of the most nutrition you could pack into a one-gallon container. Milk always has been called the "almost perfect food." The only nutrient lacking in milk is iron. One cup of milk will provide the following U.S. recommended daily allowances: Calcium —30 percent Vitamin B12 —15 percent Protein—2o percent Vitamin B6 —4 percent Riboflavin —25 percent Phosphorus—2o percent Vitamin D —2s percent This proves to us just how important a cup of milk can be in one's daily diet. Children need at least three servings of dairy products per day, a teen-ager four, adults three and pregnant and lactating wome...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1991

June 1991 Workshops prepare rescuers for farm accidents By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Editor HARRISONBURG —When someone is dangerously trapped in the jaws of heavy farm machinery, it's no time for a rescuer to learn how the equipment operates and how to free the person. Preparing rescue squad members and firefighters for such emergencies was the purpose of a two-day workshop sponsored by the Rockingham County Farm Bureau Women's Committee and Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Companies April 20-21. Using dummies as victims, participants got hands-on experience with new implements at Hevener Equipment Co. and with other machinery and silos on the farm of Dan Myers. The 16-hour course also included classroom instruction. Tommy Harper of Bedford County, a state-certified adjunct instructor for fire personnel, taught the workshop and is doing several around the state for Farm Bureau. "Removing an entangled victim from farm machinery is different from removing a crushed aut...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1991

6 Farm Bureau is your voice Farm Bureau policy is your policy! The policy development process begins July in counties across the state. To help your county Farm Bureau develop policies on issues that affect you, take a few minutes to look over these issues of importance to agriculture. The following questions pertain to such vital topics as agricultural research, biotechnology, health, import quotas, land use, labor, zoning, and many others that affect farmers in indirect ways. Your needs and opinions will be considered in forming policies that are voiced in Virginia's General Assembly and in Washington. • Answer only those questions that concern you. • Check or fill in answers where appropriate. Number and write longer answers on a separate sheet of paper. • Mail or take your responses to your county Farm Bureau office by June 30. Policy Development Calendar July 15-August I—District Policy Development Meetings July-September—County Resolutions Committee Meetings July-October—Count...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1991

June 1991 &J members' opinions by June 30 Labor 28. Should employee benefits be expanded for migrant and seasonal farmworkers? □ Yes □ No 29. Should an exemption exist in Virginia's law from migrant worker housing inspections for employers of less than 500 man-days of labor as provided by federal law? □ Yes □ No 30. What should we do about harassment from the Legal Services Corporation? 31. Should children under age 14 continue to be allowed to work in agriculture with parental consent? □ Yes □ No 32. Should Farm Bureau support legislation which would require employers to provide leaves of absence for employees for family related issues? □ Yes □ No Land Use Planning and Zoning 33. What should Farm Bureau s policy be toward a statewide master plan? 34. Do you generally support planning and zoning to ensure proper land use? □ Yes □ No 35. Is our current Land Use Assessment and Taxation Law an effective tool for land preservation? □ Yes □ No 36. Do you support the current c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1991

8 We're outnumbered and outdone bv mosquitoes By TOM AND JOANNE O'TOOLE Outdoor Journalists Mosquitoes are responsible for irritating bites, cause itching welts, can spread diseases, and are a constant aggravation at picnics. No wonder they are so disliked. Like many other things in nature's cycle, there are thousands of different species of mosquitoes around the world, all having different flight habits, food and climate preferences, and breeding requirements. Only two things are constant. The females need a blood supply to lay their eggs, and water in which their young must hatch. These blood-sucking buggers are hearty and adaptable, surviving freezing temperatures and hundred-degree heat. The mosquito' 'season'' is year-round in hot, humid parts of North America, while in other areas the cycle begins and ends different times of the year depending on the climate. Usually, wet, warm, spring and summer months are peak times, when the critters are hungriest. The northern fringes of t...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1991

June 1991 House ag member is Animal Industry Day speaker BLACKSBURG—Texas congressman Charles Stenholm, member of the House Agriculture Committee and chairman of the livestock committee, will present the keynote address at Virginia Tech's 28th Annual Animal Industry Day July 12. Stenholm's topic will be "National and International Polices and Their Effect on the Livestock Producer.'' He will speak in the afternoon session at Tech's livestock center, following an introduction by James Olin, Virginia's sixth district representative, who also serves on the House Agriculture Committee. Prior to these comments, livestock producers attending the day's events will be welcomed by Virginia Tech President Turner to stress market development (Continued from Page 1) modifies such as tobacco. ' As long as farmers are able to make money... with tobacco, there is no reason for us to be emphasizing that we should not be growing tobacco," Turner said. "But there are other crops that are complementar...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1991

10 Flowering shrubs bring back memories and add charm Old-fashioned flowering shrubs are my gardening soul food. Show me a lilac in bloom and I am swept back to my childhood, picking fragrant clusters with schoolgirl friends at noon recess. Brilliant yellow forsy thia still means just one thing to me—whether or not the groundhog saw his shadow spring is coming. Perhaps such shrubs evoke similar feelings for you. Did your grandmother have a weigela or mockorange in her yard? Does bridal wreath, or spirea, tell you summer is here? It's easy to capture these feelings in your own garden. Forsythia Is one of the earliest shrubs to bloom. Early bloom means vulnerability to late frosts which can turn golden flowers into mush. Happily, it also means forsythia is easily forced. Cut several branches from it in late winter and place them in water indoors. In a week or so, you will be Forestry tours in four areas The 16th Annual Spring Forestry and Wildlife Bus Tour Program includes four trips ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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