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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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CALIFORNIA RAISINS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

CALIFORNIA RAISINS. Mr. F. G. Jeffers, of Visalia, Tulare county, recently sent a box of raisins made by himself from three varieties of grapes of his own raising, to tho editors of the New York Tribune, by whom they were referred to a committee composed of the principal hotel keepers of that city, who reported upon them as follows :— (hi the Rose of Pern.— Mrs. Linthicum: This is fully equal to the best imported from Palermo: tho skin is more tender and is sweeter. Warren Leland: I have been buying raisins for 30 years, and I seldom find a better article. Muscat of Alexandria.—Mrs. L.: Fully equals the best; remarkably fine flavor; skin delicate and size fine. Mr. Leland: I never saw so good a raisin from Sicily. On the Zagos, —Both Judges: Sweet, tender, rather small, a good cooking raisin. Mr. Jeffers also communicated the following facts with regard to the prodxiction of the grapes, and the manner of their preparation :— I gathered and spread on scaffolds in the sun, about the m...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE ALVARADO SUGAR FACTORY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

THE ALVARADO SUGAR FACTORY. The supply of beets at the Alvarado Sugar Factory, having become exhausted, the company suspended operations, for a short time, on Saturday last, preparatory to arranging for the new operation of "refining." In the process of making sugar direct from the beet, (or cane either) several grades are produced, the poorer of which require a further process of refining before they are suitable for the market. A large quantity of this low grade (brown sugar) has accumulated, and the temporary suspension of work above alluded to, is to make the necessary preparation for this new work, none of which has yet been done at that establishment. After working up all their own low-grade or "raw" sugar, the company will go into the market and purchase raw cane sugar, sufficient to keep the works in operation until the next season's crop of beets comes in. By this arrangement the factory may be kept in constant operation the year round. There is no necessity, as some intere...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
MECHANICAL PROGRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

MECHANICAL PROGRESS. Wooden Railboads. — The Chicago Railroad Gazette for Fob. ISth has an article by Wm. S. Hnntington, in which ho quotes the report of a Canadian committee appointed to examine the Clifton Wooden Railway, in Northern Now York. We give an extract from this report: "Theexpense of keeping the track in repair will not, according to Mr. Hulburt, the engineer of the road, exceed the wages of two men to every three miles of road. Those men will replace the worn out rails as fast as required. This does not include renewal of trestle or crib work. The 20-ton locomotive will easily take SO tons per trip and make two trips daily—between Carthage and Harrisville, -17 ]. 2 miles. The rails arc made of maple, 14 feet long. 6 by 4 inches, laid edgewise. Mr. Hulbnrt suggests that rails would be best 7by 3% inches. The rims of the wheels are like those used on iron railways, only wider, and the flanges a little beveled, so that the flange, in pressing against the rail, does not cu...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS. Tim: Pikenixville Bone Cave. —The U. S. Railroad Register gives an extended notice of the bone cave recently discovered in Chester County, Pennsylvania, near Phoenixville, by Mr. Wheatly. Prof. Cope exhibited a large collection of the smaller bones at a late meeting of the American Philosophical Society. It is said to be one of the most important discoveries yet made upon the continent. The remains found consist of mammals, reptiles, insects, and plants. Among them are three species of gigantic sloth, one as large as tho Megatherium of Europe. Five feet of a mastodon tusk, which when entire measured eleven feet, was found in fragments. Hones of the cave bear, two species of horse and ■everal species of tapir, wen; found. The collection is also rich in the bones of the smaller animals. Further investigation will determine more definitely the ago of the deposit. Prof. Copo referred, in the course of his remarks, to certain similar fossil animals of acknowledged pa...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

CORRESPONDENCE.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Notes of Travel in Tuolumne and Calaveras Counties. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Notes of Travel in Tuolumne and Calaveras Counties. [Written for the Prehh.] From Garote to Chinese Camp. Second Garote, Tuolumne county, is situated on the Yosemite turnpike road, fortyone miles from Hutching's hotel, Yosemite valley, and sixty-eight miles from Stockton. Little or no mining is now done here, agriculture having taken precedence. Every little valley has its field of grain, or orchard and vinery. Between this and First Garote, Mr. E. Muller has beautified some twenty acres of land with orchard, vines, etc., and has a fine, brewery where he manufactures for tho mountain trade, ale, porter, and beer. First Garote, two miles off, the point at which travelers for the Yosemite valley halt over night, contains two good hotels. The Stage House is kept by B. L. Savory, a gentlemen who fully understands his business. Two miles farther is Big Oak Flat, now nearly deserted in a mining way, but for twenty miles aroiind the citizens aro turning their attention to the production of...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Right and Left—An Error Corrected. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Right and Left—An Error Corrected. Eds. Press.—ln the Scientific Press of the 18th inst., was printed a paragraph relating to the fact that the result of walking is a tendency of the right side to outwalk the left; and your conclusion is, that a person walking some distance in a forest would find himself involuntarily going to the right of his true course. Now, to a person "up a tree" in said forest, a man whose right side was outwalking his left would be seen to go more to the left, for the reason that the left foot is the pivot upon which the body must rest more than it does upon the right; otherwise, the right foot could not outwalk it. [We are obliged to correct the corrector here. The item alluded to reads as follows:—"A scientific lecturer on walking says his experiments show that one side of the body always tends to outwalk the other side." The credit of the whole paragraph belongs not to us but to the lecturer, who states that the almost invariable tendency is to wander off ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Curious Telegraph Cable Statistics. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Curious Telegraph Cable Statistics. The Atlantic cable, although it is only about an inch in diameter, covers an area of over a million square feet of the earth's surface, that is to say, about 23 acres of ground at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean, the area, indeed, of a small farm. The inductive surface of the conductor of the Atlantic (1865) cable is about 481,---000 square feet, or 11 acres of area. The exterior inductive surface of tho guttapercha is 1,526,845 square feet, or 35 acres. The conductor of this cable contains 263 tons of copper, drawn into 13,250 nautical miles of No. 18 wire, a length which, laid over the surface, would more than suffice to join the north and south poles of the earth. The insulation contains 338 tons of guttapercha and compound. A No. 16 copper wire, of the same resistance as a mile of the insulator of the (1865) Atlantic cable, would be over 8,000 millions of miles long, that is to say, long enough to be laid ronnd the orbit of the planet Neptune...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOME AND FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

HOME AND FARM.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD ADVICE FROM AN EXPERIENCED FARMER. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

GOOD ADVICE FROM AN EXPERIENCED FARMER. Editors Press: —I notice my name in the Press a s a contributor to its valuable columns, and having a little time (a rare thing with me at present) I accept the invitation. I have carefully perused each number of your valuable paper, with profit and much pleasure. It is just the kind of paper needed, on the Pacific coast, to educate the farmer, horticulturist, and stock-raiser up to producing to a profit; up to good cultivation, summer fallowing, subsoiling and irrigation—four essentials actually necessary to assure good yearly crops in California. A large proportion of our farmers are intelligent men, capable of managing general business with success; yet sadly at fault in tilling the soil. As a rule, our agriculturists and stock-raisers too, have been educated to other callings and professions than farming, and are not yet, to all appearances, sufficiently acquainted with soils and climatic influences. Many farmers here, as elsewhere, ignore...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Resources and Productions of San Joaquin County. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Resources and Productions of San Joaquin County. San Joaquin County, for soil, climate, good stock, and agricultural products, is perhaps unsurpassed by any other section on the Pacific Coast. The City of Stockton. According to the statistical report of the County Assesor, for 1870, contains a population of 10,000; wide streets running at right angels, containing hundreds of fine buildings,many of them costly; 18churches; large and expensive schoolhouses; accommodating 1,300 scholars; scores of large stores, manufacturing establishments of various kinds, producing leather, harness, boots and shoes, flour, wine, brandy, carriages, wagons, brooms, furniture, agricultural implement! of various kinds, etc., to the amount of over $1,000,---000 per annum; two large flouring mills, with the capacity of turning out seven hundred barrels per day; two foundries, three fire companies and a hook and ladder company, two Masonic lodges, two Odd Fellows' lodges, Turn Verein, Rural Cemetery, Agricu...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
EXPERIMENTAL FARMING IN TULARE COUNTY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

EXPERIMENTAL FARMING IN TULARE COUNTY. The following letter is from a correspondent in Orange Grove, Vandalia, Tulare County; and was prefixed by a paragraph highly complimentary'to the Rural. It contains just the kind of information which we wish to obtain—personal experience. We hope to receive many more letters of the same kind from this, and from other correspondents, in different sections of the State. The experience given in deep culture, drilling and rolling, is well Avorth attention of farmers generally, and we shall look with interest for the report of final results which he promises:— I have often said it is strange that California, so prolific in its resources; a State where there is so much new to be told on the subject of fruit and grain farming; where nearly every one has to adoj)t a new system, and try more or less experiments, has no agricultural journal worthy of attention, —so you may judge I was glad on receiving from the post office, last evening, Nos. 5 and (&am...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. CALIFORNIA. Five thousand orange and lime trees are being planted in Decoto, Alameda county. The State Agricultural Society lias ordered a premium of $20 for the best one quarter acre of sugar beets. Orange Grove.—S. B. Caswell, Esq., of Los Angeles, has a very fine grove of orange and lime trees, now looldng finely and so loaded down with fruit, that he has had to prop up the limbs to prevent their breaking doAvn by the weight of fruit upon them. Grain.—Upwards of 10,000 acres of grain have been sown, this season, in the vicinity of Hamilton, Colusi county. Hon. Marion BriggS has over 1,000 acres. The crops have all been well put in and are said to be very promising at the f)resent time. Hamilton also supports immense flocks and herds. Stock in Humboldt County.—The stock in some of the hilly portions of Humboldt county suffered severely during the late cold storms. They were first reduced in flesh by the drought and the subsequent killing of the early grass by t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
PATENTS & INVENTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

PATENTS & INVENTIONS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [From Official Reports to DEWEY k CO., V. S. and Foreign Patent Auents, and Puhlihhkrs of thk Scientific Piiess.] ' For the Week Ending February 21st. Mandrel for Gauging and Cutting Solder Wire. —Lewis Cutting, San Francisco, Cal., assignor to himself and Francis Cutting. Privy.—Frank Rieiiol, San Francisco, Cal. Mop-Holder.—John Hrizoe, Alvarailo, Cal. Sewing, Machine Feeding Mechanism. — Mary P. Carpenter, San Fraucisco, Cal. Note.—Copies of V. S. ami Foreign Patents tarnished by Dewet & Co., in the shortest time possible (by telegraph or otherwise) at the lowest rati'B. All patent business for Pacific coast inventors transacted with greater security and in much less time than by any other agency.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Notices of Recent Patents. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Notices of Recent Patents. Improved Truss.—A Folleau,S. F.—This form- of truss seems to be one calculated to effect good service, allowing of greater or less pressure according to need, and net permitting the parts to protrude through any sudden movement of the 1 person. It consists in the use of a secondary pad within the ordinary pad, so constructed that it may be made to give additional pressure towards the center; and in so constructing the spring in parts, that it will readily yield to the motion of the body in different directions, without for a moment losing its efficiency in keeping the pad in place. The pad is so connected with the spring that its angle or position with reference to the spring can be readily adapted to the different forms of rupture. Operating Cutters for Steam Plows. O. Hyde, Oakland, Cal.—These improvements in mounting and operating the cutters of steam plows, refer more particularly to that class of plows in which a number of circular cutters are driven ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Drawing a Circle. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Drawing a Circle. There are many simple little ways of doing things without the need of extensive apparatus, which is often useful to know. We cannot always be sure of having the mechanical appliances on hand when we need them, and we may therefore be put to considerable trouble to effect some simple object, when, if we knew it, we could easily do what we wanted by properly using our hands. The accompanying illustration shows an easy method of drawing a circle without compasses, and one which allows of considerable accuracy. The cut hardly needs a description. The pencil, with point resting on the paper, is held between the thumb and forefinger in the manner indicated. The thumb presses on the paper which is then revolved, with the left hand, in the direction denoted by the arrow. In the beginning a little difficulty may be experienced in getting the pencil to mark an unbroken circle, but with a little practice, this difficulty will disappear and a curve accurate enough for many pur...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Why Circles Please the Eye. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Why Circles Please the Eye. Prof. Muller, in a course of lectures in Berlin, ottered a simple and mechanical explantation of the universal admiration bestowed on these curves. The eye is moved in its socket by six muscles, of which fo\ir are respectively employed to raise, depress, turn to the right and to the left. The other two have an action contrary to one another, and roll the eye on its axis, or from the outside downwanl, and inside upward. On an object being presented for inspection, the first act is that of circuinvision, or going round the boundary lines, so as to bring consecutively every individual portion of the circumference upon the most delicate and, sensitive portion of the retina. Now, if figures bounded by straight lines be presented for inspection, it is obvious that but two of these muscles can be called into action, and it is equally evident that in curves of a circle or ellipse it.ll must alternately be brought into action. The effect then is, that if two only ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Greasing Wagons. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

Greasing Wagons. Greasing buggies and wagons is of more importance than some people imagine, Many a wheel is ruined by oiling too plentifully. A well made wheel will endure constant wear for ten to twenty years it' care is taken to use the right kind and proper amount of oil; but if this matter is not attended to, the wheel will be used up in live or six years, or may be sooner. Lard should never be used on a wagon; for it will penetrate the hub and work its way out around the tenons of the spokes and spoil the wheel. Castor oil is a good material tor use on an iron axle; just oil enough should be applied to a spindle to give it a light coating; this is better than more, for the surplus put on will work out at the ends and be forced by the shoulders and nut into the hub around outside of the boxes. To oil an axletree, first wipe the spindle clean with a cloth wet with turpentine, if it won't wipe without it. On a buggy or carriage, wipe and clean off the back and front ends of the h...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POPULAR LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 March 1871

POPULAR LECTURES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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