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Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Time... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 11,688 items from Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MAKING FARMING PAY. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

MAKING FARMING PAY. Wo are all trying to make things pay, but we refuse to in .'est enough brains in the study of things so that we can make them pay. Farming everywhere, and in everything, is a deep Question, one o fthe profound est. It requires a lot of thought, study and good judgment to make it pay. Some must have an Immediate profit, and so they skin the land. Oth ers try to save expense in labor, and harvest 110 crop; others try to save ex pense in labor, and harvest 110 crop; others try to save expense in secur ing good breeding stock, and so pro duc cows theat do not giv the moat profitable result. Others refuse to feed a good cow sufficiently to enable her to produce to her fullest capacity. All about us is this ever-present ques tion of making things pay, and saving useless, not useful, expense. Surely there is neded a lot of wit and wisdom on the farm.

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXVII. A Bolt from the Blue. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

CHAPTER XXVII. A Bolt from the Blue. The trial began at tlie Old Bailey some months after the magistrates had decided to submit the charge to a superior court. Within the court the atmosphere was heavy. The lamps burned sullen ly, shadows gathered in corners, yet there was little about the groups in the well of the court suggestive ol the fact that a man, and a peer of the realm, was about to be tried for his life. The many barristers, ali who could spare time from their own i rllohrr. t0 bo„I)rosent "t this cause celebre, were there, talked with much animation, if in subdued tones, their heads together like so many cauli flowers-some with their hands clasp on fider then- gowns looking vastly like ravens or big crows. Now and Hen a ]augh maile Gwendolen, seal ed in a corner of the court. Miss llurn ,r.t h?r s"u'> w'"ce and quiver. Ronald, who was somewhere on the tack benches, had tried to prevent firm iT bei"S.,,rusoiU- n"t she was 1 J, r,anRUlsh tl)at sllL> bail been the act...

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Great Montamor Case. CHAPTER XXVI. "Rex v. James Gilbert. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

3* ;— The Great Montamor Case. By ALICE M. DIEHL, Authoress of "Tho Knave of Hearts," All Iliglits Reserved. CHAPTER XXVI. "Rex v. James Gilbert. Before many hours were over the Press blazed with' paragraphs re ating to the arrest of Robert, Lord Monta li'jor, 011 a clr.u'gc of murder, sensa tional headings met the public eye from the boards which set torUi tlie contents of the many newspapers. "The claimant arrested on a charge of murder," ran one. •'Tragic de velopment of the Jlontainor (-jjse, was the heading of another. ^ J. lie Moutamor arrest for a crime, was the dark hint of an evening paper. Robert, standing white, motionless, while the cab was being fetched to convey him to Bow-street, thought With a shuddering horror of Ncitft :.ud liis mother. He must send a tele gram. Ill his first interview with his solicitor he would give 110 account of the substance of his defence until a telegram had been despatched. "1 am detained for a time on ail absurd charge, which 1 can absolut...

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE "SACRED CAUSE" OF AGRICULTURE. A High and Noble Calling. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

THE "SACRED CAUSE" OF AGRICULTURE. A High and Noble Calling. Agriculture Is the only life's job to which the Creator ever directly set a man. He put Adam in the garden of Eden "to dress and keep it." Conse quently, the Mayor of the English town of Windsor was not far wrong— certainly he was not guilty ot' affecta tion—when, in the course of his open ing remarks at the Itoyal Counties Show the Qj.her day, he spoke of "the sacred'~eause of agriculture.". We are not to confine thu word" "Sab ered" to matters that touch upon man's* future state merely. Anything that intimately concerns man's pres ent happiness and well-being may be so called. Anything that is high and noble; anything that can bo exalted in the conception and the doing; any thing that conduces to the best in man and the best in his surroundings may 'be called sacred. All this may truly be said of the cultivation of the soil and husbandry at its best. It is not easy for a farmer always to remember, this. One is not always...

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXVIII. The Cause Celebre Ends. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

CHAPTER XXVIII. The Cause Celebre Ends. Public curiosity had been wlietted by the first days of the trial. The whole story, from first to last, was so extraordinary and romantic a one. .Hot arguments and altercations oc cupied those fcf' the 'public who had sufficient leisurer to discuss the events the passing hour. Such a ro Hi. i crystallised into - many a long day. W ars and rumors or wars were in abeyance for the time being. Over the family meals, from the highest to the lowest in society, the Montanur case was excitedly, sometimes pas sionately. discussed. Many espoused tho cause of the supposed murderer, and, against all moral or religious law, upheld that justifiable homicide, if in deed Charles Daunce were actually dead, was to be lauded rather than condemned. Others, rigid in their ac cepted canons of right and wrong, de fended the victim of Lord Montamor's summary revenge—held that every unit had tho right to act for his oi lier own benefit—that one man had | its much righ...

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BALLARAT HORSE MARKET. Friday. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

BAiLARAT HORSE MARKET. Pndas. Coles and Pullurn report:—We yarded and offered at auction for the week 34 ihorses, 284 Kittle, and 198 pigs. Horses: Supplies were light, and comprised a few ueeful heavy draughts and ordinary sad dle and harness sorts, all being from the district. In the absence of any fresh lots of draughts, there was not much at tention given to those yarded, but prices ■liave no change from lato rates; a few •useful draughts of Mr H. Lonsdale, Blow hard, made JE24'10/; a few aged horses _£8 to JL'1-4; and a number of ordinary liame*» and saddle horses made from JL'o to .£9/10/. Coghlan, Boase and Co. report:—We offered at auction at our yards this week 93 horses. 117 cattle, 157 pigs. Horses: Pair supplies cajnc forward for to-day's market, comprising a few extra heavy draught colts and fillies and a number of 6 to 8-vear-old draughts, the balance consisting of light harness horses and ponies. Our principal drafts came from the Elmhuret district and loc.il breeders...

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Then He Was Somebody. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

Then He Was Somebody. "Yes, sir," said Philip, "I've come to tho conclusion that I amount to something after all. There have been times when I was disposed to believe that I was a mere cipher In the world, but I can never have 90 small an opinion of myself again." "What has caused this sudden change in your estimation of your self?" "I have just been talking to a man who wants my vote." "When a woman says she la Inde pendent slie means she has the spirit to ask men to protect her instead of waiting meelcly until they choose to opine and offer their services.

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IV. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

IV. Next day the market in Woola mucks experienced some thrilling hours. At ten o'clock a 2/- bid pro duced a thousand shares, which were instantly absorbed. A few odd lots followed at the same figure. Then came a pause. Two-and-threepence tailed to uncover more than fifty shares, but 2/G brought out five hun dred. Then the fun commenced. It was known that Blakeley had vanish ed, and that circumstances had satis fied the market that Woolamucks, as speculative counters, were dead as doornails. All sorts of rumors were llying around, but as yet the unknown buyer's identity had not been dis closed. Shrewd dealers argued that, whoever he might be, he was not out for mere frolic. There was too much steady, dogged persistence about the buying for that, and here and there they, too, began to nibble. By noon the quotation had risen to 5/3, sell ers, and every parcel was instantly snapped up. In the oflice at Cheapside tho au thor of all the commotion sat quietly by Emma's sit'.e, with penci...

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Complimentary—in a Way. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

Complimentary—in a Way. "John, said Mrs. Harkins "I heard a nico compliment for you to-day." Mr. Harkins put his paper down, twisted lip the ends of his mous tache, looked pleased and said: "Well that's nothing remarkable. I receivo compliments nearly every day." Mrs. Harkins went on sipping her tea and her husband waited for her to resume. Finally, he said: "Well, why don't you tell me what it was? Who was it that compli mented mo?" "Oh, you couldn't guess in a week." "Mrs. Deering?" he ventured. "No." "Not Bessie Fallington?" lie rather eagerly suggested. "No." "Oh, well, of course, if there's any secret aihout it, I don't care to hear what it was, or who said it." ."There isn't any secret about it," Mrs. Harkins sweetly returned. "Mr. Hanuaford told me that, every time he and I met, he ibecame thoroughly convinced that you were a man of ex cellent taste." John Harkins then shoved his hands down in his pockets and walked out side to think it over. It lias been said tliut speech ha...

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
V. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

V. Since Macdonald left the mine a brief weekly cablegram had arrived at the office, reporting the progress that had been made, bufi indicating nothing calculated to cheer the hearts of shareholders. The latest one had been received five days preceding Macdonald's appearance in London, and lie had immediately wired 'back to Korrest for further news. Three days after the spurt in the market there was still no reply to his mess age. He was beginning to despond, and said s to Emma; but she had somehow developed a profound and cheerful optimism regarding tha mine's future. "I'm perfectly sure, Mr. Macdon ald," she said, "that it will come all right before long. I know it will." "I ibelieved it once, too; but at that time I had only my own little "wor ries to shoulder. Now " He broke off and smiled, looking at her grate fully. "But I'm not going to kick. After all, this has been a wonderful week to me. Instead of a whipping, T feel I owe Blakeley thanks for giv ing me cause to come over....

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BUYING NEW IMPLEMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

BUYING NEW IMPLEMENTS. In buying new implements or ma chines, every man will be guided by his own experience or fancy. • We find one nmn swearing by a certain make of machine, and the next neighbor by anot Iter make, both claiming that tlieir machine is best, and maybe it is, ac cording to conditions and usage. In considering the various points in fa vor of any machine, one should always take into account the accessibility o£ each part. One has often spent an hour or more in trying to get at some part needing repair -while the actual job has only taken 10 minutes to do. A Scottish fanner recently paid a visit to a South of England cattle show, and while walking around got talking with a native farmer. Neither could well understand wliat the other said. The Scotsman got a little net tled at this, and put it down to the Englishman's stupidity. "Man," he said at last, "yer cows moo a' right, and yer cocks craw quite plain, but I'm hanged i£ I catt mak' you oot."

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"Home." [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

"Home." He had been around from church to church trying to find a congenial congregation, and Anally he stopped in a little church just as the con gregation read with the minister: "We have left undone those things which we ought to have done, and we have done those things which wo ought not to have done." The man dropped into a pew with a sigh of relief. "Thank goodness," he said, "I've found my crowd at last."

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A VICAR'S "DRINK POINTS." [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

A VICAR'S "DRINK POINTS." The Rev. George Denycr, vicar of St. Paul's Church, Blackburn, issued some novel "drink • points" in his parochial letter for November. He stated:— The man who can afford to get drunk is too rich. , The beat thing to keep in the beer bottle is the cork. If you get the best of whisky it will get the best of you. The man who tried to drown his sorrow in (jrink found that it could Bwim. It costs a man more to have a seat in a public-house than to have a seat in the church. It takes a long time to age whisky, but it won't take long for whisky to •age you. Forty women are a deluBion: one v-oman is a snare. Beauty is as Inseparable frou^ truth as fragrance from a rose.

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PATIENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

PATIENCE. "To know how to wait," says Oe Jlaistre, "is the secret o£ success." Cyrus Field was ten years in laying the Atlantic cable. The first time he tried to lower it the great rope snap ped in mid-ocean, and when they grap pled it and brought it to the surface, it slipped away from them, and was gone. Not until he had tried thirty times was the tireless patience of the inventor rewarded. In life's school one of the hardest lessons is to learn to wait patiently.

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Unintentional Frankness. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

Unintentional Frankness. The Bishop of London, who has been "going for" music-hall immor ality, recently told a story of a visit he paid to Buckingham I'alace to see King Edward. As he was going in he passed the late Lord Salisbury coming out, but the statesman did not seem to know him. In the course of conversation he mentioned the meeting to King Ed ward. "Oh, Lord Salisbury never recog nises anybody," replied the King, and going to a bureau he took out a new photograph of himself and handed it to the Bishop. "What do you think of that?" ho asked. "A very excellent likeness, sir!" re plied the Bishop. "Well," said the King, "when 1 showed it to Salisbury ho looked hard at it for a minute and then said: " 'Poor Btiller! I wonder if he is really as stupid as he looks?'"

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
INSIST UPON BETTER ROADS. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

INSIST UPON BETTER ROADS. Better roads are essential lo better living as well to the farmer's com fort and convenience. They are essen tial lo the reasonable pleasure of h;s I family. Good roads mark the stand ing of every community. The greatest objection to living in the country is the difficulty of getting about. You must get about if you properly market your crops, if you j are to keep your machinery in order, if you send your children to school, if you go to church or attend meet ings. These are not little filings. They are matters of vital importance. Bad roads impose the heaviest tax on a farmer that he pays, and he is cer tain to pay for it, whether he knows it or not. He pays it in the wear and tear of all his vehicles. He pays it in the additional labor imposed upon his stock. He pays through the labor or self-denial of his family. Therefore, work for better roads as you would work to put out a lire in your barn. Study the best methods for building and maintaining better r...

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE VALUE OF LEMON JUICE. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 25 April 1914

THE VALUE OF LEMON JUICE. A teaspoonful ot juice in a small uup of black coffee may relieve a bili ous headache. The juice of half a lemon in a cup of hot water taken on awakening in the morning is an excellent liver cor rective. A lotion of lemon-juice and rose water will remove tan and whiten the skin. Lemon-juico with olive oil is far superior to vinegar for a salad dress ing—equal parts used for blending. Lemon-juice on loaf sugar is good for hoarseness. ■ If when boiling sago or rice a tea spoonful of lemon juice is added, the grains will be whiter, and a delicate llavor will bo imparted. We all know the value of salt lind | lemon-juico Tor removing stains from white goods. After the juice is ex tracted, the rind dipped in salt clean ses brass beautifully and convenient ly. It also removes unsightly stains from the hands. ; Tough meat can be made tender by adding a teaspoonful of lemon-juice to the water in which it i§ boiled.

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CYCLING. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 2 May 1914

CYCLING. Frank Kramer, the wonderful American rider, who is racing in Europe, has en joyed a marvellous succession of vic tories which, according to the Yankee papers are " growing tiresomo to the Parisians, who want contests instead of runaways." Some of his recent wins aro the match with the pace-followor Lapize, the Consul-General's prize, when ho van quished Ellegaard, Dupre and Friol; a victory in a tandem race with Pouchois, while at Brussels, in 100 kilorns. Inter national Teams Race, with Venhouwaert as partner, ho proved himself a stayer, the pair riding in fine style throughout, and winning comfortably.

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER III. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 2 May 1914

CHAPTER HI. Before Peter Bellairs left Bloem fontein he bad a long interview with the lawyers, Messrs. ICrux and ICru ger. They gave him a copy of part of the will, which satisfied him that his friend 1 ad dealt fairly by him. A the rest of the money, which Paul Danvers called his pile, was secured for the maintenance of Sheila. It was to be hers without let or hindrance. It was to be hers if she married even at seventeen, and it was to be hers if at the age of twenty-one 6he were still unmarried. But the sum of Paul Danvers' wealth was not mentioned. Peter ask ed Mr. Kruger what It amounted to, and to his astonishment was told that this was a secret which would not be revealed until the money was hand ed over to the young heiress. All Kruger would permit himself to say was this: "It is a large sum—a very large sum, but I am not allowed to mention the amount. That was one of my client's strictest injunctions. You may take it for granted, however, Mr. Bellairs, that your little ward,...

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE ART OF DRESSING WELL. [Newspaper Article] — Pitfield Banner and Hollybush Times — 2 May 1914

THE ART OF DRESSING WELL. The real art o£ dressing well does not lie in slavishly following the fash ion, 'but in choosing styles and colors to suit oneself, and in thiB way em phasising one'B <best points. A gown, however, simple, should foe chosen with due regard to one's own personality, but to do this it is neces sary to spend more than one can afford. ri'he great mistake so many women make in the matter of dress is in not pausing to consider whether the gown or hat they intend having will suit their own particular style of beauty. Because a hat or -frock looks well upon your friend it does not follow that it will look equally well on you. Your coloring and figure may be dif ferent, and in that case the same drees cannot suit you equally well. To be well dressed a woman must foe suitably dressed, and all the ac- j cessorieB, which make so great a dif ference to the effect, must be care fully chosen.

Publication Title: Pitfield Banner And Hollybush Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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