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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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IS DOMESTIC LIFE DISAPPEARING? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

IS DOMESTIC LIFE DISAPPEAR-     ING?     "Does the present generation shirk domestic   life?" was the question which occupied the atten-   tion of members of the New Victorian Club, Lon-   don, the other night, and the reader of the open-   ing paper, Miss Mabel Hawtrey, answered it with an emphatic affirmative. The present generation she defined as those members of the community who were in the prime of life, and domestic life she defined as the life of the family in the home; and remarked that it was obvious that many members of families avoided staying in their homes as much as pos- sible. But, though admitting a tendency to shirk domestic life, Miss Hawtrey was far from con- demning it. Formerly women adhered to the home because they had no other sphere; now many frankly admitted it had no charms for them. Miss Hawtrey proceeded to draw a lively picture of the drawbacks to dom...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO REMOVE INK FROM CLOTHES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

TO REMOVE INK FROM CLOTHES. Take a teaspoonful and a half of salt and mix it with a quarter of a pint of milk. Soak the stained part in this, and the ink will disappear. If the stains are old, two or three hours' soaking may be necessary. Fruit stains may be re- moved by the same process before the articles have been washed.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO RAISE THE PILE OP VELVET. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

TO RAISE THE PILE OP VELVET.   Cover the smoothing-iron with wet cloth, and hold the velvet firmly over it. The vapor aris-   ing will raise the pile of the velvet with the   assistance of a light whisk. To carry out this   treatment the hat should be picked apart.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO MAKE GOOD MELTED BUTTER SAUCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

TO MAKE GOOD MELTED BUTTER SAUCE.   Take one ounce of butter, one ounce of flour, and three-quarters of a pint of cold water. First melt the butter in a saucepan over the fire, and stir in the flour; work well till smooth with a wooden spoon. Then add the cold water, stir- ring it to make all smooth, until it boils and thickens. Cook slowly till the sauce leaves the sides of the pan and the flour is cooked; nothing is so nasty as to taste raw flour in sauces. If a richer sauce is desired, add an extra half ounce of butter. Always weigh and measure the quantities for this sauce if you wish it to be good, and avoid waste.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT'S IN A NAME? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

WHAT'S IN A NAME? A village in Anglesey boasts the longest name in the United Kingdom. The following is a copy of a telegram sent to this village from Chepstow on March 2, 1888: "Going to Llanfairpwllgung wllgogerhwllclydiligogogoch; shall be home at 4.30." The surveyor was asked by the post- master if this was the correct name of the place, and sent the following answer: "It is an attempt at the name, but is evidently not written by a Welshman; the spelling is incorrect; and, but for the joke of the thing, the ordinary abbrevia- tion, 'Llanfairpwll,' would have been better. The full name, correctly written, I give below, 'Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerchwyrnydrobwillian- ndisilliogogogoch.' "

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A JEWISH WEDDING CUSTOM. FIVE PER CENT. ON THE BRIDE'S DOWRY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A JEWISH WEDDING CUSTOM.     FIVE PER CENT. ON THE BRIDE'S DOWRY. An interesting light was thrown on matri- monial methods among the Jews during the hearing of a case of slander at Cardiff Assizes the other day.   The plaintiff was Mrs. Sarah Finsberg, wife of a Cardiff jeweller and pawnbroker, and the defendant. Mr. Eli Cohen, of Manchester, and interwoven in the case was the story of the en- gagement of Mrs. Finsberg's daughter to Mr. Cohen. The alleged slander was an imputation on the prospective mother-in-law's character. In the course of the amatory correspondence, Mr. Cohen declared that Miss Finsberg was the "only soul on earth to make him happy." He   confessed that since the young lady left Man- chester the "sunshine had departed from his life," to which counsel added, "rainfall is pretty heavy at Manchester." This letter added, "the whole world seems dull and dreary." Another letter from the young man said. "The belle of ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE HOPE BLUE DIAMOND. MILLIONAIRES COMPETING FOR ITS POSSESSION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE HOPE BLUE DIAMOND. MILLIONAIRES COMPETING FOR ITS POSSESSION. New York society circles are greatly excited over the arrival of the Hope blue diamond, for which Mr. Simon Frankel, a New York diamond dealer, is reported to have given £50,000. During the voyage it was kept in the purser's safe, and every precaution was taken to ensure its safety. Mr. Frankel was met at the quarantine by Mr. Emanuel Gattle, a Fifth-avenue jeweller, who offered £70,000 for the diamond. The offer was refused. Mr. Gattle wished to purchase it for the wife of a New York millionaire. Other millionaires are now reported to be competing for its pos- session. It is rumored that Mr. Alfred Vanderbilt is anxious to secure it for his wife. The possessor of the gem will be the envy of every woman in America. Mr. Frankel said to an interviewer: "No pur-   chase was ever more difficult. The diamond was entailed in the Hope family, and before the order of Chancery releasing it was issued, we had to ge...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FIRED HIM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

FIRED HIM. "Mr. Waffles," said the landlady, "I have a word to say to you." "Make it a dozen, Mrs. Fry," remarked the young man. "Mr. Waffles," said the landlady, "you have been smoking in the parlor." "Yes, Mrs. Fry." "You have smoked in the parlor many times, Mr. Waffles. And you have smoked in your room and in the library, and even in the dining- room—and you owe me for three weeks' board, Mr. Waffles." . "Yes, Mrs. Fry."     . "Where there is so much smoke, Mr. Waffles, there must be some fire." So she fired him —Cleveland "Plain Dealer."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WORTH OF MONEY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

    THE WORTH OF MONEY.   In the period of 150 years following the dis- covery of America the depreciation of the pre- cious metals was about two-thirds of their value; that is, in 1650 a given amount of gold or silver brought only about one-third as much as in 1500. The result naturally was extreme confu- sion in affairs, great suffering among wage- earners, and embarrassment to all whose in- comes were fixed in terms of money. The "poor laws" of Queen Elizabeth's time have been attri- buted to the distress caused by the rise in the money value of food without equivalent compen- sation to the wage-earning class. The quarrel of Charles I. with Parliament was undoubtedly aggravated by the necessity for new taxes to overcome the declining value of the revenues, and some historians hold that it was the deadly money question, the bane of politicians in all   ages, which cost that monarch his head.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE MAN WHO TELLS HIS DREAMS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE MAN WHO TELLS HIS DREAMS.   The world is full of awful bores (You may be one yourself,   So much so that your friends would like   To put you on the shelf), But when I pass them in review, From mild ones to extremes, Among the very worst I count The Man Who Tells His Dreams. "I dreamed the strangest thing last night!" He tells you when you meet. You have a sigh, but, wretched man! Politeness chains your feet. And then he pours into your ear A farrago that seems Of highest interest to him. The Man Who Tells His Dreams. You try to break away, and can't, He holds you by the coat Until he's told his foolish tale, From common sense remote. What cares he though his victim writhes And mentally blasphemes? He thinks of no one but himself,   The Man Who Tells His Dreams. —Somerville Journal.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A STEERABLE BALLOON. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A STEERABLE BALLOON. This sketch shows the motor and rudder of the steerable   balloon by Villars at the Concours D'Aria, Lyons, with which trials were to be made on the first favorable opportunity.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MILKING COWS BY VACUUM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

MILKING COWS BY VACUUM. An apparatus has just been devised which will   keep the milk in a vacuum from the teats to the   pail, thus positively excluding from the milk the   impurities which abound in the air of every cow-   shed.   The "milker," as the apparatus is called, is actuated by suction, which may be obtained by an ordinary vacuum pump worked by steam, oil, or gas engine, an electric motor, or a water- wheel; or an ejector may be used attached to a boiler which creates the vacuum by a steam jet, so dispensing with the necessity for an engine. Connected with the vacuum-producer is a vacuum containing-tank, and a range of pipes run along the shed over the cows' shoulders. From this pipe a short branch descends between every alternate cow, having on it a vacuum cock. To work the apparatus, one end of a rubber tube is attached to this branch, while the other end is connected to the pulsator, which rests upon the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Gambling Systems. SOME "INFALLIBLE" THEORIES. MEN WHO BROKE THE BANK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

Gambling Systems.   SOME "INFALLIBLE" THEORIES. —#— MEN WHO BROKE THE BANK. There it something intensely fascinating in the   possibility of winning large sums of money on   the racecourse or at the gaming-table. The poor   punter in particular constantly dreams of a run of luck which will suddenly make him rich,   and it were joy unspeakable to break the bank   at Monte Carlo or Ostend. This ruling passion   has fathered no end of "infallible" systems, the   latent of which is in the possession of Lord   Rosslyn (described in "The World's News" of   last week), who is on the point of putting his   secret knowledge into practice at the famous   gaming resort on the Riviera.     SYSTEMS OF ALL SORTS.   There have been all sorts of infallible systems,   some of them very simple, s...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOPE YET. 15,000,000 MORE WOMEN WANTED. A STATISTICAL ARTICLE SHOWING THAT A BACHELOR IS A BLESSING IN DISGUISE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

HOPE YET. 15,000,000 MORE WOMEN WANTED. A STATISTICAL ARTICLE SHOWING THAT A BACHELOR IS A BLESS- ING IN DISGUISE. The Government of one of the German States has just passed a law warning all bachelors to marry under a heavy penalty. Some of the men have gone over to the majority and become husbands rather than pay the fine imposed by the new Act; but, generally speaking, the new move has proved a failure. Instead of it having the desired effect, and re- ducing the number of spinsters and increasing that of the benedicts to any great extent, it has taken a contrary course. There has been a sort of general exodus of the young men from the country, who have gone to live in the neighbor- ing German States, where they may remain bachelors. It is quite a common thing to hear people in Britain describe a bachelor as a selfish person, and as an object lesson for the world to shake its head at. They have a belief, held in rever- ence by thousands, that every bachelor cheats seven women out ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MIXED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

  MIXED.   At a meeting where a committee'was being   condemned for their management, the speaker   said:—   "Perhaps you think that in our committee   half do the work and half do nothing. As a mat-   ter of fact, gentlemen, the reverse is the case."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT THE KING CANNOT DO. IN A VARIETY OF WAYS KING EDWABD IS LESS FREE THAN HIS HUMBLEST SUBJECT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

WHAT THE KING CANNOT DO.   IN A VARIETY OF WAYS     KING EDWARD IS LESS FREE THAN HIS HUMBLEST SUBJECT. In the first issue of "The World's News" a short description was given of things which the American President was not supposed to do— democratic though that country is. Below are a few of the things which the King of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India, and King of British Dominions Beyond the Seas cannot do. If the owner of the biggest and most valuable business in Great Britain were to write to the King, offering him a half-share in all the profits from that business for nothing, it would be im- possible for the occupant of the throne to accept this generous proposal. Just as no clergyman nor officer may combine business with his profession, so the King must not become partner with a subject. Neither can he be a tenant, nor hold anything "in service" from one of his subjects. The old law on the subject declares this to be beneath th...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EARLY TELEGRAPHY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

EARLY TELEGRAPHY.       About 70 years ago, perhaps before the present   mode of telegraphy had been thought of, an   attempt in that direction was made by a Mr.   Porter, a man of inventive faculties, who after-   wards became originator, proprietor, and con-   ductor of the "American Mechanic," the pioneer   publication in that direction, and the predecessor   of the present "Scientific American."   The southern and ocean terminus was on Rhode   Island on Rocky Farm, and the place of its   location has since been known as Telegraph Hill.   It was constructed wholly of wood, was in part   a species of wireless telegraphy. It consisted   of a series of upright posts, with a number of   arms secured to the posts at one end by privots,   permitting the ar...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COMMERCIALISM IN PRATER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

COMMERCIALISM IN PRAYER.   —«—   One middle-aged member of the First Congre-   gational Church of Buffalo, U.S.A., has been   steeped for a quarter of a century in the strenu-   ous commerce of the Queen City. He believes in carrying business principles into all that he does, into religion as well as amusement. The other evening he attended a Christian En- deavor meeting. His mind was still permeated with innumerable letters that he had written or received during the day. Most of them began somewhat after this fashion:—   "Gentlemen,—Yours of the 5th inst. at hand. In reply, we beg to state—" etc. Or, "Sirs,—We regret delay in shipment of your order of recent date—" etc. Thinking of such things, he was called upon for a prayer. He rambled on in the old fashioned, stereotyped style to such at length that some of the good Endeavorers who were impa- tient to get home began to think anything but Christian thou...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FAMILY PRIDE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

FAMILY PRIDE. Girl: "My sister's got smallpox!" Boy: "Garn! That's nuffin: my farver's got   six years."   —"Punch."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PNEUMATIC SIGNALING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

PNEUMATIC SIGNALING.   —♦—   In view of the success that has attended the pneumatic signaling on the London and South Western Railroad in England, the North-Eastern Railroad have adopted a similar system at Tyne Dock. If the old style of mechanical locking by means of levers, cranks, wires, and rods had been adopted in this instance, 250 levers would have been necessary to control the signals, etc., of this special yard, but by the electro-pneumatic signaling plant only 106 are requisite. The Westinghouse Company are carrying out the in- stallation, which will consist of two frames, one containing 71 and the other 35 levers. The Lan- cashire and Yorkshire Railroad are also adopting the same system at Bolton, Lancashire, one of their busiest stations, and it will be extended throughout the whole country within a short time.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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