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Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,270 items from Trafalgar And Yarragon Times, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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SANG TO HER DEATH. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

SANG TO HER DEATH. Maria Wlicita Malibran, tlio famous mezzo-soprano, daughter of the celu l>ratcd Spanish singer, Manuel Garcia, did not die, as is generally thought, from inllammation of the throat; lier death, at the early age of twenty-eight, was much more pathetic and drama tic. Although very ill, and advised to take a rest cure, she travelled to Manchester to fulfil a contract. Sho was engaged to sing the celebrated duet from iMorcadante's "Anclronico," with Mmo. Caradori as lier partner, and at the close of the performanco the public rose at her and demanded more. La Malibran was pale and exhaust ed, and made appealing gestures to the audience; but the clamor and tu mult went on unceasingly. So, turning to Sir George Stuart, who conducted the orchestra, she remarked: "It I have to sing this once more, it will bo my death!" In that case," said Sir George, "you liad better retire, and I will apologise to the audience."^ But she rallied at these words, and replied -"No, I wil...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Hint That Didn't. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

Tho Hint That Didn't. For ten long but blissful years tliey had walked along the path of love; but as yet the love-sick youth had never mentioned about their getting married. Courtship is very charm ing, but when there does not seem to be altar rails at the end ol it girls naturally begin to lose interest In the game. ' Anyhow, Jane thought it time that the marriage day was fixed, so Bhe threw out a gentle hint to her lover by way of encouraging him. Encour agement, she thought, was all the dear fellow wanted. "Nathaniel," sho whispered, coyly, "they're saying we're going to be married soon." "Are they, though?" answered the stolid swain. "What a joke it'll be on them when they find out we ain't." A couple of Jews were, discussing the awnrd of a railway company over an accident in which both of their wives had been sufferers. "Vot gompensation did yer git, Ikey?" asked Mo. "1 got fifteen hundred quid." "Fifteen hundred quid! 'Vy, I only got Ave." "Ah, yus. But you see, I' !ad the pr...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WRITTEN IN RINKLES. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

WRITTEN IN RINKLES. Nothing is more damaging to beauty in woman than worry. The worrying woman invites the hand of time U> write plenty ot wrinkles on her brow, and round her eyes and mouth; to tint her face yellow, and give dullness to the eye that no artifice can brighten. Worrying, moreover, is quite unneces sary, and is a total waste of energy which could be employed in doing something useful. Everyone knows the worrying woman the moment they see her. Her character ia written In her face in wrinkles which apparently nothing short of a miracle could ob literate.

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FLOWERS AS EMBLEMS. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

FLOWERS AS EMBLEMS. .The recent announcement in a con temporary that the Ulster men are trying to institute ci demonstration, when every man, woman and child will wear a flower as a token of their aversion to Home Rule, reminds one how often flowers have been used as emblems. Since the leaders of the Yorkist and Lancastrian parties each plucked a rose in the Temple Gardens, the Lan castrian a red and the York a white, this flower has been a popular emblem. Apart from the fact that red roses are symbolical of love and white of purity, our national emblem is the rose; the Legitimist Party of France formed the League oT the Rose in imitation of our Primrose League, while owing to (Jladstoue's fondness for white roses many Liberals onco wished to make them an emblem for their party, but tho idea '\vas not adopt ed. The primrose, it is said, was Ben conslield's favorite flower, and has ibeeu chosen by his followers, who formed the Primrose League, as au emblem, while in France the violet...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Naqua, the Bushman [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

-v<.. , l Naqua,thc Bushman I By Pcrccvnl Gibbon in tlio Pittsburgh "Sunday .Magazine. The old yoliow-fangi'd dog baboon Hint was chained to a post in the .yard "'ad a dangerous trick of throw ins stone*, llo ux»(jl<! seize a piece ot rock ;ti two hands, stand erect, and Avliirl nroffcd 011 bis heels, till momentiim was obtained, r.nd then let go. This missile would fly like a bullet, and woe betide anyone who stood in its way. The performance precluded any kind ' of aim-the stone was hurled ol'f at any chance tangent-and it was rather bad luck than by any kind of malice that guid ed one of the bouldei's through the window, across the kitchen, and into a portrait of Judas de liter, which hung on the wall not half a dozen feet from the slumbering Vrouw Gro bclaar. She bounded from her chair and ballooned to the door with a silent, swift agility most surprising to see In a lady of her generous build, and not a sound did she utter. Site was of good South African v...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Past and Future. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

Past and Future. "Well, Iiow are you today V" askcl tho physician cheerfully to the society leader. "Well, doctor," Bhe replied, "the cold I caught Tuesday Is a little bet ter, thanks to your prescription. But the one I caught Thursday is much worse. The tiling I called to Bee you for, however, Is the severe cold I caught last night." The doctor sat down and wroto a long line of hieroglyphics. "Here," he said, "Is something for the ono you will catch this evening with that V-neck and those Bklnvpy Bklrts. Good afternoon."

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DREAMS AND DREAMERS. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

DREAMS AND DREAMERS. There are at'.'.l, even In this enlight ened age, a number of 3uyerstlUoiiB individuals who attach a meaning to certain dreams, :u.:i WHO will eagerly refer to books 011 the subject, in older that they may usctrtain the purport of some tiocturnal reverie that is prob ably the outcom; ot a l>al digestion. If the sleep 'oe bound, the digestive | and other organs ;;re in action, and the sleeper will pass a perfectly un disturbed night. If, however, auy of the bodily functions are at ail out of order, and more especially the diges tion, the nervous system will he af fected, nnd an imperfect conscious ness will be the result. A dream is nothing more or less than an imperfectly formed thought, caused mostly by the individual not being at tho time alive to the sur roundings; and the imagination, not being under control, will wan<(fr un checked by circumstances, and tho dreamer Is under the impression that the ideas that flit through the brain are things w...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FARM HOME ATTRACTIVE. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

THE FARM HOME ATTRACTIVE. Farmer's wives and daughters often wonder why their homes do not lool; as attractive as those of their sisters ill town. They say they svork twice as hard, and do not have halt the chancc to have a good time. One very simple tiling adds much to the attrac tiveness o£ the farm home, and that is the presence of flowers. There is 110 one who can better at I ford to have pretty llowers than the ; farmer's wife, for she has plenty of land and fertiliser. There are so many pretty Jiurdy plants and shrubs that require little work and that when once started will bloom every season for a long time. There aro alBo many annual varieties that will furnish cut llowers for the Interior of the house, such as sweet peas, uasturtian, pinks, phlox and asters-my favorites. It is a pleasure to give away flowers to the slek, to carry them to the altar of tho little church, and, in fact, It seems as if they are never .out of place. There is 011 class of people who can have as go...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WRECKERS OF MEN AND NATIONS. The Smile and the Wile of Woman. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

WRECKERS OF MEN AND NATIONS. The Smile and the Wile of Woman. Empires havo fallen before the wiles ot woman. Rome sang of the achievements of Antony. Antony look ed into the eyes of Cleopatra and laid down honor and life. Louis XV. dallied with the Pompa dour and Du Barry until his kingdom tottered. The royal roue died and left his grandson and heir a heritage of death. Mary Stuart played at love with many men until she lost her throne and at last her head. These women have been the lure that led men to destruction. They bafTIed scientists and sociologists. By all the rules of the game they should have been wholly creatures of evil. Some were, tout that others of them were warm-hearted, impulsive and be witching to good aud bad people alike Is a puzzle to alienists. When face to face with the lives of these -wreckers of the world, scientists hold up their hands, shake their heads and Bay: "We cannot tell you about It-may be some day we can, but not now; it is too much to expect us t...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NEWSPAPER KINGS. Men Who Fashion History. Struggle for Supremacy. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

NEWSPAPER KINGS. Men Who Fashion History. Struggle for .Supremacy. Alfred liarniBWo.'Lh (now Lord Northcliffc), who first devised per sonal journalism in tabloid form through the medium of "Answers," is, after 110 years, the most influential private public man iti the three King doms. Some people are apt to bolt » with the idea that success commands success, and that once a man has arrived ho can sit down serenely and lortuno comes to him cap in hand. 1 I happen to know that there is no ' harder worked man in Kngland than 1 Lord Northcliffc. Like the aped Km- 1 pcror of Austria, he is dressed at 5 a.m., and ready to digest every paper j that is printed in London and the ' provinces. Before a majority of his | assistants in the many oilicrs which ho commands have hud their break- ' fast ho calls them up on the telephone j to discuss with them what shall be I tho best story for the following day. "He is a hard taskmaster, but the most stimulating man ! know," ono of his young lions to...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE DEAR OLD FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

THE DEAR OLD FARM. I remember, I remember, the house where I was born; The gaps between the Biding, where the sun came in at morn; The nail-heads that In winter wore a crown of silver frost, The small old-fashioned window-panes ?by the same hand emboBBed. 1 remember, 1 remember, the stove pipe through tub floor; Tlie kitchen Htove that, always fed, was always wanting more; The coal I used to carry, the wood I had to get; The boots that stuck so tightly when I used to get them wet. I remember, I remember, the grind stone where I ground Some forty million glckleB-how I turned it round and round Till at last 1 felt like dropping-asked if we were not most through Learned that we were nearly finished; Just another hour or two. I remember, I remember, how those summer nights would speed; How I thought that I could never get the sleep I seemed to need; I recall the voice that w ke me when the dear old clock Btruck four. And the ever-ready bootjack that hung up behind the door. I remember, ...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PREPARING THE LAND. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

PREPARING THE LAND. Much has been heard (luring the last year or two as to the value of explo sives for sub-soiling land intended to be planted with fruit trees and vines, and some authorities have made out, on paper, strong arguments in favor of their use. The lecturer in viticul ture and fruit culture at the Rose worthy College, South Australia, how ever, is doubtful if the work by such means can be performed as effective ly and economically as with teams and the ordinary implements used for the purpose, lie considers that by adopting the usual method of sub soiling a more uniform layer of soil will be obtained to a depth rawing from IS to 24 inches, and the cost of such work may bo put down-at be tween £4 and £6 per acre. On the other hand, he reckons that to secure , equally satisfactory results with ex plosives the cost will work out at. £20 an acre. In a comprehensive article In "The Journal of Agriculture" Mr. Laffer speaks highly of the English ditching plough, which is desi...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DIET FOR INDIGESTION. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

DIET FOR INDIGESTION. No treatment in cases erf dyspepsia Is likely to havo much cftcct unless the diet IK very carefully regulated. The great thing is to supply the stom ach with such food as will give it the least amount of work. Roast meat, for example, is preferable to boiled; chicken, game (not. too high) and mut ton are more digestible than beef or pork. Vegetables are frequently pro 'ductive of discomfort, particularly in the form of flatulence. They should either be given up for a time, or taken very sparingly. It will sometimes be found that a iresn salad, dressed with oil and a little vinegar, can he digest ed when cooked vegetables cannot be I taken. The latter are best served as a puree. If vegetables have to be I given up, fruits, such as baked ap I pies, grapes, and oranges should bo ! taken instead. Lemon juice aiso may I be used in water. lJread should be I toasted, or taken stale. Pastry, cakes, i twice cooked meat, soups, tea and eof I fee (except in the strictest ...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COMEDY AND TRAGEDY. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

COMEDY AND TUAUI3DY. Come now to the actor's everyday life. If you lire a comedian you can'L get any sympathy. liver hear two meg discussing tin? ' illness of a co median? .lones will say, "I hear Jack Cannot lias appendicitis." "You don't say." grins Brown. And then they liolii burst out laughing. If an actor happens to be a tragedian it is the other way about, livery happy little episode in his life is referred to witli bated breath. "Did you hear about, 11. B. Irving winning a thousand at the ponies?" Smith will say. "Dear me," Ilobinson will reply; and they will look as if they lin.d been asked to have a last look at the body before the lid is screwed down.--Fred Niblo on the disadvantages of belitg an ac tor, in "Theatre Magazine."

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WORK THE SOIL NOW. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 17 April 1914

WORK THE SOIL NOW. All orchard soils should he kept well worked during the summer moutlis. It is very essential that these should luive an abundant supply of moisture during the whole of " the growing season. The transpiration Ironi fruit and foliage is considerable at any time but during the hot and windy weather the amount of mois ture which is required by a tree, and (\vhlch is ultimately transpired from the tree, is very exceptional. Excessivo transpiration is often the cause of loss of young trees and uf new grafts. They are found to part with a large-amount of moisture, and aro not able to retain or obtain suf ficient for their nourishment; they then very soon wither and die. The I .soil around these should bo kept well stirred, they should also bo given a good straw mulch.

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Precise Man. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 24 April 1914

The Precise Man. "It looks like rain." "I beg your pardon." "I say it looks like rain." "What does?" "The weather." "The weather, my dear sir, Is a condition. Rain is water In the act of falling from the clouds. It is im passible that they should look alike." "What 1 meant was that the sky looked like rain." "Equally Impossible. The sky in the blue vault above us-the sepmlng arch or dome that wo call the hea vens. It does not resemble falling water in the least." "Well, then, if you are so thundor Ingly particular, it looks as if it would rain."' "Ab it what would rain?" "The weather, of course." "The weather, as before stated, be ing a condition, cannot rain." "The clouds then, confound you! I may not know as mucli about it as you do, but I've goj. enough sense to get in out of it, and you haven't," said the nan, as he raised his um brella and walked away In a huff. To err is masculine; to forgive fe-1 ?uiiuiue.

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A BRAW COUNTRY. Boy's Alleged Essay on Scotland. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 24 April 1914

A BRAW COUNTRY. Boy's Alleged Essay on Scotland. The following, stated to be by a Utinbury schoolboy, is reprinted from the "Southern Times," 13unbury, West Australia: - "Scotland is a braw wee land on the North o£ KagUuul. It has water nearly all round it, and whisky over a large part of it. "The population is about four and a-half millions, including Mr. Andrew Carnegie. It has a peculiar language of its own, ami if one can pronounce' it coherently it is an infallible teBt of sobriety. It possesses consider able mineral weaiin, but very little of it linds its way out of the country. "Gold has at times been discovered in certain districts, as well aB in the pockets of certain natives, but in both cases it has been found difficult to work. The best-known exports of Scotland are tiarry Lauder and Scotch whisky, though sufficient of the latter is retained in the country to satisfy the needs of home consumption. "The national dress of Scotland is the kilt, which is a kind of short pet ...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE REVENGE AGENT. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 24 April 1914

THE REVENGE AGENT. By C. D. Copplngcr in "London Opinion." Kenneth Seaforth wag sitting de spondently in an armchair when his uuin entered the well-appointed room, A gentleman to see you, sir," he said. Oldn t I tell you I was not at home to anyone?" asked Kenneth irritably. "Who is it?" "I am not aware," said the servant, "or 'is hidentity. 'JO declined to hac cjudiut me with 'is name, remarking that 'c preferred to deal direct with you, air. '10 concluded by hemphasis* ing that 'is business was himportant, 'is precise words bein' that it was of vital consequence." "Oh, tell him to go to the deuce," said Kenneth. vci*}. good, sir," said the man, mov ing to the door. "No, wait," said Kenneth, chan«tut; his nihid; "show liiin in, Curtis, I muy as well see what lie wants." Curtis went out, and returned in a feiv moments followed by a little sharp-featured man with quick brown eyes, immaculately dressed and sport ing a large buttonhole. "Air. Kenneth Seaforth?" he inquir ed. "Yes," sai...

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Then He Was Somebody. [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 24 April 1914

Then He Was Somebody. "Yes, Hlr," said Philip, "I've come to the conclusion tlmt I iunouut to somcthint; after all. There have boon times when I was disposed to believe that I was a mere cipher in the world, but 1 can never have so small an opinion of myself again." "What lias caused this sudden change in your estimation of your self?" "I liavo just been talking to a man who wants my vote." When a woman says she Is inde pendent she means she liaB the spirit to ask men to protect hor instead of waiting meekly until they chooso to come and offer their services.

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"Home." [Newspaper Article] — Trafalgar and Yarragon Times — 24 April 1914

lie liad been around from church to church trying to liiul a congenial congregation, and finally he stopped in a little church just as the con gregation read with the minister:' "We have left undone those tilings which wo ought to have done, aud we have done those tilings which wc ought not to have done." The man dropped into a pew with a sigh of relief. "Thank goodness," he said, "I've found my crowd at last."

Publication Title: Trafalgar And Yarragon Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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