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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 45 THE MONTH OF MAY. The devotion of the month of May is supposed to bo traced to St. Philip Nori, in the sixteenth century, but the devotion to Mary is as old as Christ ianity itself. We may well suppose that the tender love and solicitude with which during her life the apostles and disciples as well as the first Christians regarded the Mother, of our Lord whom He had given them for their own, was augmented, not lessened when she was taken away to the heavenly abode of her Son. She became then their most power ful intercessor as she had previously been their most precious legacy. The Mother of Christ, their Savior, who had borne II im in her bosom and nursed Him at her breast, who more near and dear to the hearts of all earthly mothers everywhere; what more natural than they should confide them selves and their offspring to her pro tection? The Queen of Sorrows whose soul a sword with sevenfold points had pierced, who more akin to the suffer ings and travails t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

40 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. of regret for the loved ones gone before steals softly through the soul, heralded and followed, it-may be, by a tear, but a tear which is in itself a prayer and irapetration. Happy the country that is conse crated to Mary, happy the city or ham let or lovely wayside shrine where her image is honored. Happy the Christian family where during this beautiful month her inter cession is invoked, her sweet protection implored, her virtues praised and imi tated. Happy the heart that turns to her in these bright May daj's, be it joy ful or sorrowful, youthful or world weary, innocent or guilty. Happy the soul in Purgatory that feels drop upon its yearning lips the tear of mercy that hears through the darkness surrounding it, the voice of supplication from the lips of some loved one-at the feet of the beloved Mother of God. For merciful and compassionate as she is at all times, and in all seasons, in this her own beautiful spring time, holiday month, her hands are fill...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 47 THE MONTH OF JUNE. How beautiful, in the calender of the Church, is the succession of the months with their varied and soul-inspiring devotions, how overflowing the eccle siastical year with its treasury of good gilts! First the preparation for Christ mas the Advent the coming of Him whom later we are to follow into Egypt through his Holy Infancy, the fasting in the desert the triumph of Palm Sunday, then the solemn tragedy of Holy Week, followed by the Resurrec tion and the glad Alleluias that accom pany us past the miracles of Whit Sun day and the Ascension to the solemn service of Trinity Sunday, the close of the Paschal or Easter time, and during those weeks, we have been doing homage to St. .Joseph, he is always there with the Lenten season, soon or late, and all the while earnest souls have been praying for the laggards who come in, many a one, .at the last moment to the Easter Communion, which is for a number the only one of the year. All through the m...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

4S THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. L ' r if . '. ? $ i r 1 vorite occupations, and he never hesi tated at torturing innocent babes. For his deeds of violence he was captured five times by the United States troops, but he made good his escape every time. For weeks at a time he lived on parched corn, when Uncle Sam's cavalry scoured the country to bring in the red-skin, dead or alive, and often he lay hidden in some un approachable lair while the soldiers rode by him within hailing distance. His endurance on horseback is astound ing even for an Indian; at one time he rode five hundred miles without stop ping. In two days he ran seventy-five miles to escape from his pursuers. Starvation, freezing, the torrid heat of the sun had no terrors for him, while his comrades succumbed by the dozen all round him. He has been wounded time and again. Fevers burned in his veins; his own men betrayed him and sold him into captivity for a few drinks of firewater, but through it all the old chief lived lived to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 40 and the Indians in genoral. The kind hearted tourist was so taken with the old chief that she got up a petition which was signed hy many fellow tour ists, begging that he be allowed to go back to the desert to die. The people of Arizona heard of it, and they immediately counter-petitioned the Government, saying that if Gcron imo must come back, the kind-hearted tourist should be sent ahead of him and put on a lonely ranch to welcome the old chief on his return to his native heath. The counter-petition was strong enough to keep Geronimo where he was. Down in Oklahoma, where he is living in captivity once more, the people do not waste much sympathy upon him. They have been too dan gerously near the borders of Arizona, and that makes quite a difference in the esteem in which Indian chiefs are held by those who know them best. FLORIDA. Florida is now the joy of the Anti quary. There, indeed, are "sermons found in the stones," and, to the Catho lic heart, "glory a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

50 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. and in this chapel he knelt before the Catholic altar. Ah, to the Catholic heart, what memories sound from these ruins! " I love the Saints of olden time, The places where they dwelt; I love to pray where Saints have prayed, And kneel where Saints have knelt." " Our Father's olden Faith we hold, Our Father's olden way, Nor will we leave the church of God For those of yesterday."' History, after all, is like the Palimp sest of the ancient Greeks. One story is written thereon, and then it is waxed over and hidden, that another pen may trace another tale. This in turn meets a like fate. And so relentless Time spreads ruin over Earth, covering the feeble work of man, "waxing over" every trace of labor and of pride, that other men, in other days, may tell another story. Is it not true that like children we write our names in the sand by the sea. Then a wave, with a murmur and a sigh, blots out all for ever! But the Church of the living God must withstand every sho...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 51 INDIAN BOOKKEEPING. IMOTOKAI, SrATKMKNTS ACCKPTKI) r.V IMPMCIT KAIT1I. A.N'I) Till: MKKOIIANT KKVBIt IAKH POBBIIUA' IIIX'AURK UK HAH NOT YKT HITCUUMIIKI) TO TI1K " KVAMJKMZIXO " OP TItK MIH8IO.VAKY A UNIQUi: I,KTTi:il. Keeping a ledger is altogether be yond an ordinary Indian's power. An Indian buys one dollar's worth, or two dollars' worth or five dollars' worth; he does not bother with the odd cents. If he wants 25 cents' worth of chewing tobacco he buys four packages for a dollar rather than puzzle out the change, which simplifies matters both for customer and storekeeper. But there are a few Indian storekeepers. On the Crow reservation, near Pryor, Mont., there is one. Seventy miles from the agency a store is kept by Plenty-Coups, principal chief of the Crows. Plenty-Coups can print and cipher about as well as a seven-year-old boy. The three Rs are unfamiliar ground to him, as to the majority of his customers. Some of them pay cash; they take their purcha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

H 52 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. EDUCATION. COMMUNICATBI). Dkak Editoii: I trust you will allow me a small space in the columns of your worthy Advocate, to write on a subject that has always been dear to my heart "Education." For the past thirty years I have spent a great part of my time in a school room, and it has often been my privilege to exchange sentiments, and listen to the different opinions of pupils and some very old ones in regard to edu cation. It seems to me the most prevailing idea is to have a book education in the sciences, combined with enough practi cal knowledge to sharpen the intellect, and give the man a good business tact or any other tact that he may be able to avoid laborious work which he looks upon as ignoble, and the idea of this business tact differs in individuals. I asked a large pupil once to define a good business man, and he gave me this curt reply: "A good business man is one who cheats every one he can, and lets no one cheat him." I was amazed and amused....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

IE INDIAN ADVOCATE 53 to "overcome and bridle those inclina tions and passions so common at this age and which are detrimental to both soul and body. But what shall we say of the religious training of youth; how many are given sweet pot or novel names and trained with no higher idea of their noble dostiny, than the pet animal fondled on the lap of its fair mistress, while others through sheer neglect on the part of parents, and teachers, to whom God has entrusted these noble beings, permit them to run headlong to destruction, and often by their bad example pave the way to make it easy and familiar to them. No one is more intimately acquainted with the characteristics of childhood and 3'outh than the teacher who has closely observed and studied them for over a quarter of a century, or perhaps a full half century. Therefore every care and precaution should be observed to give them good example and see that their surround ings are moral and pure, as their young innocent minds are like ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

54 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. her charities in this direction; the children educated in these schools are an honor to their teachers and to the founders of the schools. In the new order of things these same schools, built at a great expense and well furnished, are soon -to bo de prived of any Government aid, and the children are to be sacrificed to the craze for what are called non-sectarian schools. Long ago Senator George G. Vest, of Missouri, who had made himself thoroughly acquainted with the Indian question a man totally unprejudiced declared publicly "that the only schools that have ever done the Indian any good are those conducted by the reli gious." Though this was wisdom crying aloud in the streets, yet the cry was to deaf men, for many would rather see the Indian damned than that he should be saved by Catholic influences. Sad experience has shown that with out a careful religious training the so called educated Indian is worse than when in his savage condition; both time and mon...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. bh PACK OF CARDS-PRAYER BOOK AND BIBLE. A private soldier named Richard Lee was taken before a magistrate for play ing cards during service. It appears a sergeant commanded the soldiers at church, and when the parson had road the prayers ho took the text. Those who had a Bible took it out, but this soldier had neither Bible nor common prayer-book, but pulling out a pack of cards he spread them before him. lie just looked at one card and then at an other. The sergeant of the company saw him and said: "Richard, put up the cards; this is no place for them." "Never mind that," said Richard. When the service was over the con stable took Richard before the mayor. "Well," says the mayor, "what have you brought the soldier hero for?" "For playing cards in church," "Well, soldier, what have you to say for yourself?" "Much, sir, I hope." "Very good. IT not T will punish you more than man was ever punished." "I have been," said the soldier, "about six weeks on the march. I...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

5G THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. in a pack, I find fifty-two, the number of weeks in a year, and I find four suits, the number of weeks in a month. I find there are twelve picture cards, representing the number of months in the year, and on counting the number of tricks, I find thirteen, the number of weeks in a quarter." "So you see, sir, a pack of cards serves for a Bible, an almanac and a common prayer book." What About This Obligation? We hear a tremendous lot of talk these days about our national obliga tions to the Philippines. Wo cannot, the expansionists say, prove recreant now to the obligations which Dewey contracted for us when he destroyed the Spanish fleet in Manilla Bay. Or dinary eyesight requires a strong mag nifying glass to see even the semblance of an obligation contracted bT us on that occasion, but the expansionists can close both eyes and' see responsi bilities of momentous proportions placed upon us then. When the government announced its intention of confiding the edu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. o white child in New York state is from $20 to $30. The Indian child has cer tainly the advantage- in appearance at least or figuratively speaking, as Father Nilan might put it. But it is probable that the tuition supplied to the Indians is like the beef, blankets and other things sup plied to them. Tt is large, promising and cosily when it leaves the hands of the Government, but by the time it filters down through an army of agents the best part of it is1 absorbed and the Indian gets only what is not worth intercepting Gratitude. A striking illustration of the grati tude of the Indians among whom Catho lic missionaries have labored is fur nished in a letter lately received by the Rev. Henry R. Granjon, of St. Mary's Seminary, Baltimore, who is director for the United States of the Association for the Propagation of the Faith. The letter comes from De Smet Mission, Idaho, and is signed by Head Chief Scttise in behalf of all the Coeur d'Alene Indians on the De Sm...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

rmmfmnmrn wmi 'wmn 58 - it'.'UI'li.fl'pi THE TNDIAN ADVOCATE. XtJe VSc1 ofjpurgatory. How many sweet reminiscences this title recalls to a Christian mind. EASTER AND THE HOLY SOULS. St. Leo called Easter the "Feast of Feasts," because it is kept in commem oration of our Lord's resurrection from the dead. Even the derivation of its name would indicate that God, who shapes races and people at His will, especially prepared the great northern nations to receive His truths centuries before they became Christians, and through the medium of their own mythology. Venerable Bede relates in his history of the early English Church that the Anglo-Saxons called April Easter month or the month of Eostre. Eostre, in both the early Saxon and German mythologies, was the goddess of the vernal dawn, resembling in some sense the Aurora of the Greeks. In the chro nology of these Germanic races Spring began about April 1st, hence Eostre typified an awakening or resurrection of the forces of nature the beg...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 59 hoped and longed; and beyond Him lay the boundless horizons of Life Eternal. Many had dwelt here, in faith of His coming for thousands of years; and now henceforward all eter nity lay like a broad river flowing tranquilly through unfading meadows of peace. As to those of old, Easter was a day of rejoicing, so to-day must the souls in prison be filled with gladness, even in the midst of their sufferings. It is the feast of the resurrection, and we may piously believe that, mindful' of his sojourn among thorn in the past, our Lord has remembered them in His tonderost pity and called man)' of the most worthy to the enjoyment of His infinite love in heaven, sending his comforting angel to console the poor sufferers that remain deprived yet awhile of the light of His countenance. Likewise may wo believe that the fasts, prayers, and supplicating alms of the faithful on earth, during the holy season of Lent, have hastened the cleansing of all. We, whose duty it is a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

60 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. lie practices are those which to-day rank superior in chastity and all kin dred virtues; in Europe three of them, indeed, having manifestly had bo stowed upon them by the Lord the grace to withstand centuries of persecution without losing the Catholic faith. Let us this Easter, thon, resolvo that wo as Catholics shall not bo luke warm in America in holping the holy souls, since thereby it is evident wo obtain many blessings and graces for ourselves. THE YOUTH'S FIRST DRINK. The youth in the bloom of manhood Stands at the door of tempting sin ; While the smile of boon companions Lure him on to enter in. He leans against the marble counter While his brain is dead to think, And the voice of a friendly comrade, Greets his ears, "let's take a drink." He thinkB not of the iiery demon That lurks in the cup that iB red, Of the millions laid low by its poison Who sleep in the vault of the dead. He looks round on his jovial companions, And admires their rapturous bliss...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of the Indian Missions. Vol. XI. JULY, 1899. No. 3. LAFAYETTE IN AMERICA AND FRANCE, By (Jhaiu,ks J. O'Mam.ky. ' rn. Lafayette's wound laid him up for several weeks. During his enforced absence from camp, he was lodged for the most part in the convent of the Moravian Brothers at Bethlehem, Penn sylvania. During these weeks of pain he was not idle. His letters home particularly to Madame Lafayette were frequent and encouraging. To his wife ho described minutely the potty jealousies rife against the Commander General Washington. He foresaw that French ofiicers, going home dis appointed on account of their services not being accepted by the American Congress, would likely spread abroad reports detrimental to the American cause. These he forestalled, and by timely explanations prepared American sympathizers in France to receive with composure the sudden news of the fall of Philadelphia, which occurred after the battle of Brandywine. While La...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

62 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ever, passed the letter by, with the remark to the effect that if let alone the Marquis Lafayette would strip the palace of Versailles lo furnish the American army. He was right. La fayette, who often drew on his own resources to clothe the American troops, would have little conscience in depriv ing the French King of luxuries, so that the colonists' army might have necessaries. He was a republican. Disappointed at .the French Court, he wrote to the commander at Marti nique proposing an attack on the Eng lish islands under American colors. The Commander Bouillo approved of the daring exploit, and would have en gaged in it, had not the French minister withheld his approval. Failing in obtaining even permission to land on French soil, the boy-general rejoined the army soon as able, indeed some days before his wound was fully healed. Shortly after returning, he had the satisfaction of driving, with only a small detachment of three hundred and fifty men, Lord Cor...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. G3 transports for crossing Lake Champlain upon the ice, whenco, after having burned the English flotilla, he was to proceed to Montreal and act as seemed most advisable. It is impossible, within our limits, to enter into the details of this farcical campaign against Canada, begun too late, and never, perhaps, intended in earnest. Reaching the command to which he was appointed, Lafayette found there a bare 1,200 of miserably clad troops. Under the circumstances, he did the best that ho could. He made treaties with the tribes of hostile Indians, organized his little army, fed and clothed it, and inspired every soul with hope. A list of foreign oflicers serving under Lafayette at this period, most of whom were Catholics, may not be amiss. Generals Kalb and Conway, Count Pu laski, Kosciusko, who afterward fell in the cause of Polish liberty, Colonel Ternant, a Frenchman, La Colombe, aid-de-camp to the marquis, the Mar quis do la Iloyerie, Gimat, another aid of Lafay...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1899

04 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. invincible. Howe was recalled and Sir Henry Clinton despatched to the scene of action. The joy with which Lafayette re ceived the news of the alliance of his native land with the cause of the land he loved may be well imagined. He felt that he had done something to bring this about. The Americans must have felt so likewise. Bonfires were lighted throughout the camp on the night of the second of May, and Lafayette ornamented with a white scarf, and accompanied by all the Frenchmen engaged in the American j cause, were invited to the spot. There ! was a national feeling of deliverance I and of gratitude toward the deliverer. On the royalist side, action, no less decisive, was taken. Rightly guessing that re-enforcements must soon arrive from France, the British evacuated Philadelphia. This evacuation came nigh ending the career of the French world-patriot. While preparations for leave-taking were going on in the English camp, General Washington sent Lafayette, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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