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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

RECLAMATION MEANS PROFIT. Figures compiled by the federal de partment of agriculture indicate that our crops of corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye, buckwheat, flaxseed, potatoes and hay for 1903 were raised upon 215,000,000 acres of land, or 11 per cent of the area of the republic, not including Alaska. The farm val ue of these crops is placed at $3,000, --000,000, or at the rate of $13.70 per acre. Wheat was valued at 62^ cents per bushel, and other crops in propor tion. Engineers who have made a study of irrigation and our arid lands west of the Mississipi, claim that 100,000,000 acres can be reclaimed by irrigation, and made highly productive lands, which command at all times and seas ons an abundat supply of water, and will yield larger and more uniform crops than the land in the valley of the Mississippi dependent upon rain fall. Irrigated lands in California sell for from $100 to fIOOO per acre, and have been sold for $1800. In Colorado this season 710 tons of sugar beets were pro...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

16 Two Birds One Stone diffifi&fc In purchasing a Separator you want to apply the old rule of killing two birds with one stone; if you can make it three or even four, so much the better for you. Here are six features X^Pfl that the SHARPLES TUBULAR SEPARATOR possesses which no others possess: It is the • ] fy^v lightest running machine on the market; runs 20 per cent lighter than any other make, 50 per (\M^ A cent lighter than some. Its bowl can be cleaned in at least one-fifth of the time that it takes i^H|O^t§l to clean other separator bowls. This makes "two birds." Now for more! It is the only machine f\. J>^l-|*^jg&k that has a low-down supply can; only reaches to the waist. Don't believe the fellow or ad- N^N^SillirW tlillk vertisement that talks of having a low-down supply can to his separator; they are at least 2 feet |nJ3S»// llllk higher than that of the Tubular. Make him set his machine alongside of a Tubular to prove his IJI I ■ fflrf/| IHii claim, and he won't...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

Seattle Daily Star with The Ranch One Year, only $1.60 THE RANCH . VOL. XXI. JN TO. 11. LOOK OUT FOR THE CUTWORM IN THE last issue of The Ranch at tention was called to the probabil ity that the cutworm, also known as the army worm and caterpillar, would appear this season. The suppo sition was based on the fact that this spring there have been seen some white butterflies, which lay the eggs from which the cutworms come. It had also been noticed that in one part of the city there were a few worms present rather early in the season, but this may have been due to the un usually warm spring that we have had. Another thing that makes it probable the cutworm will be here this year is the fact that 1904 is the fourth year since the attack in great numbers by the worm was inflicted upon the ranchers. These worms come only; once in two years to any great extent. Our prediction seems likely to come true to an extent, for reports have been received that in the vicinity of Tacoma the ranchers ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

2 may be practised to advantage where the ground to be covered is not too great. It is cheap and effective. Still another method is to trap them in poison, which consists in taking some fresh green clover, and treating it with a pretty strong solution of paris green, then placing it underneath some boards or cabbage leaves, or under a light covering of earth. The worms will stop at the clover when they reach it and eat the poisoned stuff. If the worms start to climb fruit or other trees wrap a strip of coarse cotton around the trunk about two feet from the ground. The worms will reach the cotton and can go no further. A Public Market in Seattle. Seattle is in a fair way to soon have a public market, where the farmers of the county can dispose of their farm produce every day and carry home their cash. The Seattle Market Com pany has been organized, with Col. D. B. May as president, R. M. Hennington, secretary, and W. B. Allison, treasurer. Negotiations for a site of one block bounded...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

THE RANCH The Ranch Company, Publishers. PHIL. L. AXLINQ Editor Associate Editors: F. WALDEN. H. L. BLANCHARD. Office: 36 Downs Building. Subscription, in advance, one year, 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscription will be $1. Seattle subscribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and salaries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and ad dress, and all arearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration of subscription is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Failing to receive the paper regularly, you should notify the Seattle of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

4 HORTICULTURAL NOTES Many readers of The Ranch will re member Prof. S. W. Fletcher, who at one time filled the position of profes sor of horticulture in Pullman. On ac count of the death of his wife he re signed his position and returned to the state of New York. He now has the position of supervisor of "Extension Teaching and Farmers' Reading- Course" in the Cornell University col lege of agriculture. In a recent letter to the writer he says: "I am very pleasantly located here, and my work is most congenial. Some time I hope to be able to renew my acquaintances in the Northwest." The occasion of writing was the transmission of a copy of a paper read by Prof. Fletcher at the twenty-eighth biennial session of the American Pomological Society, entitled "A Sketch of Fruit Growing in the Pacific Northwest." The fact that Prof. Fletcher spent some two or three years in this section of country enabled him to write with a degree of discrimination that no man living in the east alone could...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

from peaches in that some varieties will thin themselves but this is not true of peaches. Very few peaches ever fall off if they are not hurt by frosts. Some apples thin down to one in a place and sometimes more. We find that our Winesaps, Black Twigs, Arkansas Blacks, Macintosh, Vande vres, Gravensteins, Maiden's Blush and some others are the ones that self thin, while the Ben Davis, Mis souri Pippin, Jonathan, Stark, Snow, Rome Beauty and some others are varieties that do not thin themselves. How to thin is an important question. In the case of peaches we have to lay down a rule to have the ones left so far apart on the limb. From four to six inches apart is the rule we go by in thinning peaches. This rule means that on the same limb the peaches must be that far apart. But it may happen that peaches on differ ent limbs will be nearer than that. This is the rule if the peach tree is uniformly full but if the tree has most of the fruit on one side or in the top then this rule must b...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

6 THE DAIRY Better Butter is Wanted. While the late season has been res ponsible for many drawbacks in pro duction, it has had a contrary effect in milk and butter production through out the country generally. The Elgin Dairy Report, after careful canvass of the situation, arrives at the conclusion that production and shipments will ag gregate fully 10 per cent in excess of last year. The same authority speak ing of the quality of product, voices a complaint which will be recognized and appreciated by the country at large. Continually and persistently we hear the same old story from the dealers and receivers of creamery but ter, that the proportion of fancy to the amount received is not what they would like —is not as great as it ought to be; that it would be much easier for them to dispose of a thousand tubs of fancy, at full prices, than of under grades at lower prices. It would seem that, with all the information scattered about by the dairy schools, experiment stations and other...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

once to the ripening temperature, 65 to 70 degs., according to the season of the year. From the cooler the cream flows into the cream vat, and as soon as about 20 gals, of cream is in the vat, 10 to 15 per cent of pure culture starter is added to the cream and thoroughly stirred several times, while we are separating as well as during the afternoon. As soon as the cream has developed about .36 per cent acid it is at once cooled to 54 degs. and enough ice water around the vat so as to lower the temperature 2 to 3 degs. during the night. Butter is churned, washed, worked, salted and packed with care. Cleanliness, good milk, pasteurizing and pure cultures, are necessary in or der to turn out first-class butter, uni for mand with keeping qualities. From a Pennsylvania buttermaker the following statements were receiv ed: "I separate cream from milk at a temperature of 85 or 90 degs., then run the cream through a Miller pasteurizer. I heat to 167 degs. then cool to 38 or 40 degs., then wa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

8 HOUSEHOLD MKS. iS. V. IHTCHER How to Clean Wall Paper. Remove every particle of dust from the* paper with a soft cloth. With flour and cold water make a stiff dough; take a convenient piece and rub the wall gently downward, being careful not to cross the paper, or to go up again and in this way go around the entire room. When the dough becomes dirty cut off a slice. Furniture Polish. A good furniture polish consists of one ounce of linseed oil and two of turpentine, or 15 ounces of white wax, one ounce of powdered yellow resin and a quart of spirits of turpentine; stir until dissolved, lay it on with a cloth and polish with flannel. Many old housekeepers prefer beeswax and turpentine for polishing furniture, to linseed oil and turpentine. Tuft the Hair Mattress. It is the advice of an experienced housekeeper that both economy and comfort are secured in hair mattresses if close tufting is insisted upon. Try this, she advises, the next time a hair mattress is to be made over. Out of...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

THE FIELD When to Cut Clover for Hay. It will soon be time to cut clover and grass for hay, if the best quality of winter feed is desired. Clover should be cut when in full bloom, or soon af ter, writes F. B. Terry, in the Practi cal Farmer. If one hasn't much to cut he may wait until it is a little past full bloom, as it cures easier at that time. If he has many acres to cut so it will take two or three weeks to do the job, it is better to begin quite ear ly, rather than have the last of the clo ver mature, so that all or nearly all of the blossoms are turned brown. It will take more work to cure this early cut clover, but the quality will be choice. It will be more digestible. Clover that stands until most of the heads are turned brown has lost some of its feeding value. Part of what would have been digestible when in full bloom has changed into woody fi bre that will fill an animal without feeding it properly. You will have to feed some grain with this late-cut clover to make sto...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

10 POULTRY H. L. BLANCHARI) Young chicks should not be allowed to run in damp grass. Fresh cut bone fed three times a week gives poultry a thrifty appear ance. With an increase in the popular ap preciation of poultry and eggs as food the people pay a higher price for them. There is more profit in poultry now than ever before. There will be a handsome profit in it for some years to come, at least. Turkeys, ducks and geese should be given more consideration at poultry shows. They are a valuable adjunct but are shoved to the rear or omitted entirely at most of the shows. On a farm, where the fowls are given a free range, one good, active cockerel will answer for 15 hens, and two for a flock of 30. More males than are actually needed are an expense that should be avoided. Too often the farmer's fowls have to take care of themselves the whole year. This is a mistake. They pay as well as anything else on the farm, according to the amount invested. Therefore give them the attention due the...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

CALENDAR SPRAYING WASHINGTON § Jan. by NOTES TO Sulphur-lime or • Jose Nearly Twig Peach to or ( . [ borer.. to or Just water, and ' done •by , v ) wash Codling fall In Apple, j is by f lime in and ings necessary, ( Codling green the Apple, Ti.' Paris All open Just ; lime in are July, necessary, ) J June hatch 15) 15 i (May Paris in i j soap. to or When Apple, mainly J June to the the 15 (May "■■•■'"■■■ to are water, 5 \ kerosene 10 part louse.. Apple, mainly foliage keep to new appear soon potato, (to water, 5 if later, Cottony . foliage As soon Flea Beet, During the fall Peach, prune Kerosene (May) to 12 cottony foot. ........ ...... to of up .^ During a out prune borer Peach, Slug Paris Pear, cherry foot. base to ing of If in appears eggs. Slug Paris Pear, the cherry ] Sulphur-lime fruit trees of Red adding ( This will kill the winter eggs. If the mite appears in summer, use \ Sulphur-lime fruit Red the of emulsion, adding Cherry Repeat, emulsion Cherry ( spray. Cherry Just Cherr...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

12 LEGAL NOTES K. .1. ROKYKK This department is open to all the patrons of The Ranch. Inquiries on legal matters will be answered free in these columns. If a reply by letter is desired enclose a fee of One Dollar to R. J. Boryer, care The Ranch The validity and negotiable charac ter of an instrument are not affected by the fact that: (1) It is not dated; (2) does not specify the value given, or that any value has been given therefor; or (3 does not specify the place where it is drawn or the place where it is payable; or (4) it bears a seal; or (5) designates a particular kind of current money in which payment is to be made. But nothing in this section shall alter or repeal any statute requir ing in certain cases the nature of tho consideration to be stated in the in strument. Instrument is payable on demand: (1) When it is expressed to be payable on demand, or at sight, or on presentation; or (2) in which no time for payment is expressed. Where an instrument is issued, accepted, or ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

LIVE STOCK Value of the Angora Goat. Interest in the Angora goat is in creasing in the state of Washington, especially in the western section, where there is a great deal of logged off land that must be cleared of brush. The owner realizes that the goat is a good destroyer of brush and where conditions are favorable he is disposed to get a few goats. The Angora is preferable to the common kind, as the profits from such animals are larg er than from common goats. The his tory of the Angora goat in this coun try dates back less than fifty-five years, the first importation having been made about the year 1849 by one Dr. James B. Davis, of Columbia, South Carolina, who was at the time in the employ of the Turkish government in the culture of cotton in Turkey. Dr. Davis' work was so satisfactory to the Sultan that, upon its completion, he presented the American .with nine of the finest goats in the country. Eight of these were true Angoras and one was a Cashmere, but the doctor supposed ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

14 efforts and the type of this animal is fixed in his mind. He begins to make this a standard of excellence. How to get possession of such foundation stock is the problem with the beginner. So long as fashion gives value to pedigrees and families one needs to make a study of fashionable pedigrees. Here the be ginner is likely to fall into the com mon error of placing pedigree above individuality. Fashion is fickle and a pedigree that is fashionable today may have no attraction to buyers next year, but the individual of high excellence is always sought and gives character to a herd. Instead of following the crowd at sales, where the inexperienced is easily stampeded by the arts of the auction eer and boomers, he would better spend some time visiting some of the sub stantial breeders and note their meth ods of handling and feeding, and com pare their animals and their pedigrees and prices. A few weeks spent in this way before the fairs and sales will be a wonderful help. He can see n...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

he gets corn. If the Washington far mer can get the corn cheaply enough and has sufficient alfalfa on hand to last the feeding season there is no reason why he should not be able to turn out as fine beef as the farmer in the corn belt. In fact, the latter large ly uses alfalfa and corn as the exclu sive ration and makes good money with his steers. The same may be said of raising and fattening of the hog. It is evidently not generally known in this section that alfalfa is one of the best feeds that can be given the hog, beside a small allowance of grain at fattening and finishing peri ods. Clover is a great favorite with the hog raiser, but those who have tried both alfalfa and clover say the former is superior for the purpose. It stands pasturing better than clover and is a better feed. The worth of alfalfa for hog feeding is not confined to it in its green state, as the dry hay is very valuable. The experiment stations have made tests and find that the dry hay was a big boon in the...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 June 1904

11 Don't You Believe @SS^ ThG J&HGtft Wll° says n*s °^ style bucket bowl separator is "just as good" "V'jjjk B «C? *mmf*7MMm as the Tubular. Tell him that you are from Missouri and "must yT/^v be shown." Remember what we say: The Tubular is the closest skimming separator. It re } J^L-~X cently skimmed more than twice as close as the best out of three other competing machines. coMIEI iK Write for press clipping of the Fairmount Separator competition. When it comes to ease of AS s^>Jmf^m>> operation, THE TUBULAR RUNS 20 PER CENT LIGHTER than any other make. All the CwJ^u^^aT^FlSSlm. gearing can be got at in an instant. It has an oiling device that does away with sight-feed ySsSjftSlJVj !lPi% lubricators, that often leak out all the oil. It has the only low-down supply can ; all other separa- I 1 I ( MMI llHii tors nave theirs at least two feet higher up. One separator manufacturer is circulating ridiculous (LJJ K^Fjt HUI pictures of his "low-down" supply can, wherein the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

THE RANCH . VOL. XXI. NO. 12. Beautiful Pacific Dogwood Edmond S. Meany, University of Washington (Reprinted from The Pacific Monthly. Portland, Oregon.) AMONG the many ornamental trees and shrubs of the Pacific coast of America, there is not one that will surpass the dogwood. At present it is only sparingly used in parks and on lawns, but the day is not far dis Every May it gladdens with prolific bloom the coniferous forests of the Puget Sound basin, the Willamette valley of Oregon, and southward along the coast ranges of Cal ifornia to the San Bernardino mountains and the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada. This is the way Charles Sprague Sargent, in the "Sil va of North America," speaks of its beauty: "The flower clusters of Cornus Nuttallii are more beautiful and con spicuous than the flowers of any other tree of the Pacific states; and in early spring, when the great flower scales have grown to their full size, it lights up the dark and som ber forests which are the home of th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 June 1904

2 PRUNING AND TRAINING THE RASPBERRY The method of pruning the raspber ry depends upon the mode of training it, and the training upon the habit of growth. There are many systems in practice of training the raspberry, re gardless of their being suited to the natural habit of the variety planted, and hence no set rule could be given to guide an amateur as to the best method of pruning without causing confusion. To go into the details of the various systems would involve a lengthy article with perhaps little to be gained therefrom. The purpose of this article is to de tract from the various systems in vogue and permit our attention to be drawn to the natural habit of the plant, and from this standpoint to submit the why, when, and how to prune. The habit of the plant is governed by the variety. Why horticultural literature has not classified the habits of growth of this fruit is beyond my comprehen sion, as the habits are very pronoun ced and upon the best control of the natural habit ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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