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Elephind.com contains 116,947 items from Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Canada Admits Hindoo Woman. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Canada Admits Hindoo Woman. .The first Hindoo woman and the first Hindoo boy who ever entered Vancouver or British Columbia, Canada, to make the province their home, arrived recently on the Empress of Japan. There are thousands of Hindoos living In the province, engaged in working in the woods or In operating sawmills. Some of them have made much money. For a long time the government refused admission to Hindoo women, but recently this ban was lifted. The new arrival w T as tiie first woman to take advantage of it. Her husband went to India from Vancouver three years ago, to pay a visit to his home. He had made money and intended to remain in India, but when the bpn on women was lifted lie decided to return where opportunities were greater. He brought his wife and twelve-year-old son. Tiie father Intends to send the Hoy to the public schools of Vancouver.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
PURE WATER FOR HOLY CITY British Have Repaired Pontius Pilate's Reservoir and Death Rate Has Dropped One-Half. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

PURE WATER FOR HOLY CITY British Have Repaired Pontius Pilate's Reservoir and Death Rate Has Dropped One-Half. Jerusalem, situated the valley of the Kedron, boasts of only one small spring, the Virgin’s fount, so named because it is believed the Mother of Christ drew water from it. Ever since Solomon’s day the want of water has been felt lu Jerusalem, and the British, since their occupation, decided to repair and use the ohP reservoir, now known as Blrkett Assoub and lying a few miles to the south of Solomon's pool. It was built by Pontius Pilate and it was from here that he brought water to the city in the days of Christ, Pilate’s old reservoir was repaired and enlarged, its capacity today being 5,000,000 gallons. Galleries were built in various directions to tap the numerous surrounding springs, including those of Ain ed Dirweh, in which, it is said, Philip baptized the eunuch. A powerful pumping plant was Installed by which the water is pumped up to large reservoirs built on high...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
FINALLY SCARED CROWS OFF Device Employed by Los Angeles Man Was Somewhat More Effective Than Neighbor's Umbrella. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

FINALLY SCARED CROWS OFF Device Employed by Los Angeles Man Was Somewhat More Effective Than Neighbor's Umbrella. “Not long ago a friend of mine from Birmingham was sitting out on my front porch when a flock of crows flew across one of my fields,” said R. B. Posey, “and he remarked that it was the biggest lot he had seen for years, and asked if they did not injure my crops. I replied that until I got onto a way to keep them out of my watermelon patch they ruined a lot of them hy pecking holes in one and then hopping for another. “I tried various ways hut without success, until I put poles around tiie patch and ran just an ordinary piece of cotton around them about eight feet from the ground, and between the poles tied pieces of cotton to flap in the wind. It worked like a charm. “A neighbor of mine used to say that he was advised to put an old umbrella in the middle of the patch, and he did it, but one day creeping up behind it, he peeped over It and there sat a bunch of. crows havi...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
No New-Fangled Notions. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

No New-Fangled Notions. John came from down state to the city schools. He was placed in the seventh grade, and then his teacher’s troubles began. His mother thought the course of study should be identical with the one which bad held sway in the faraway red schoolhouse. She objected strenuously to physical culture and music, saying they were a waste of time. And then came John’s first day at manual training. The next day came an indignant note to the teacher from John’s mother. It read: “Dear Miss I want you to quit having John waste his time at school. That music and physical torture exercise was bad enough, but now you begin to learn Idrn to whittle. PDase stop it immediately or I’ll change him to another school. He inherits whittleing from his father and his brains from me. I’m paying to educate him, so educate bis brains.” —IndianapoHs News,

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Superheated Steam. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Superheated Steam. Two decades ago few' would have admitted the possibility of permanently regularly producing steam at temperatures of from 550 degrees to 630 degrees Fahrenheit within the restricted area of the ordinary locomotive boiler. Now thousands of locomotives use this superheated steam, and its use is increasing. By heating steam 180 degrees Fahrenheit above the saturation temperature “hot steam” is produced. With tliis increase of temperature the steam is dried and the volume is increased. But the increase of volume Is less important than fhe suppression of all condensation in the cylinders If the superheat, is sufficiently high. Hot steam being a bad conductor ir also reduces loss by cooling ii tire cylinders from 25 to 30 per ceru, ~v-cording cording to type and structure of the engine.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Cave Has Natural Heat. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Cave Has Natural Heat. A naturally heated cave has been discovered at Horse Butte, near Bend, Ore., which apparently draws its warmth from a subterranean volcanic source. The discovery was made by C. A. Yu rue 11 and H. D. Eide, local fuel dealers. The cave is located near the top of the butte and first attracted attention when a wave of heat was fell issuing from tiie mouth. Tiie cinder bottom and rock walls of tiie tunnel are unbearably hot to tiie touch, the heat increasing as far back as could be explored. That the phenomenon is a recent manifestation was Indicated by (he smoldering of grass and twigs near the opening. To test tiie natural oven Mr. Yarnell cooked a light breakfast hy introducing raw articles of food into the aperture and closing the orifice for a few moments.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
LAND IRRIGATED BY INDIANS Before the Advent of the Spaniards the System Was in Vogue Among the Aborigines. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

LAND IRRIGATED BY INDIANS Before the Advent of the Spaniards the System Was in Vogue Among the Aborigines. Irrigation began in Texas many years before the lands embraced within Its boundaries became a part of the United States, years before those same lands made up what was known as the Lone Star republic, writes James K. Preddy in the American Forestry Magazine. To bring the time down to a more tangible date, the first irrigation work was done —according to tradition — when the Pueblo Indians constructed the peculiar ditches about El Paso and tiie Pecos country, which authorities of today claim were built for irrigation purposes. Another tradition coming out of the past tells that tiie.se ditches were built by the Yuma Indians when they were driven westward by the Comanches and Apaches, and not by the Pueblos. When Coronado, the roving explorer, opened this country to the Spaniards lie found well-worked irrigation systems among the Indians; this was in 1540 when he was pushing towa...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
FROM LOWLY TOIL TO FAME Edwin Dallin, Ranked as Great Sculp, tor, Was Once Wheelbarrow Boy in Mine in Utah. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

FROM LOWLY TOIL TO FAME Edwin Dallin, Ranked as Great Sculp, tor, Was Once Wheelbarrow Boy in Mine in Utah. One of America’s greatest sculptors, Edwin Dallin, was once a wheelbarrow boy in a mine in Utah, where he toiled all day for less than a dollar. The miners uncovered a stratum of white clay one morning, and Dallin, forgetting his work, sat down and began to model a likeness of one of the workmen. So lifelike was it that his teacher, when lie returned to school in the fall, sent it and some of his drawings to a state fair being held in Salt Lake City. A rich mineowper had his attention called to tiie little clay bust and lie offered to furnish the boy transportation to Boston where lie could enter an art school. The boy worked long and hard, and by the time he was twenty-one he had a studio of his own, the Detroit News recalls. He went to Paris shortly afterward and began a series of Indian poses, using the Indians from the Buffalo Bill show at that time in France. His first ma...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Formerly Our Superiors. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Formerly Our Superiors. She was angry about the bill —insisted she had paid Ter The credit man stood listening attentively, attempting at intervals to break In on her flow of conversation. “You men want to understand right now that you can’t hoodwink the women any longer,” she blurted. “Little things like this —like sending out statements for bills already paid—won’t get you a thing. It won’t get you a tiling.” “Yes, madam, but I—” “And bear that in mind, will you? The old days are done. Women are men’s equals now.” “Yes, madam,” the credit man finally got in. “Yes, madam, women are men’s equals now—formerly our superiors.” Just what she said after that—well, the chronicler sayeth not.- Indianapolis News.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Is Capital's Best Speller. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Is Capital's Best Speller. Frank B. Willis, Ohio’s successor to Warren G. Harding in tiie United States senate, qualified as Washington's champion speller during his term In the house. The National Press club staged an old-fashioned spelling bee at tiie Willard hotel, with the nation’s famous statesmen and rising young journalists as contenders for first honors. Senator Miles Poindexter of Washington, then, like Willis, a member of the house, stood to the end, groggy but dogged. “Ogee” was the word on which he finally w’ent down. He thought it meant something like “ouch” and lie couldn’t define it nor spell it. Willis’ years at Ada had taught him much, among other tilings how to spell “ogee.” He bowled Poindexter out and stood alone. —Gus J. Karger in tiie Cincinnati TimesStar.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Relief in Pictures. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Relief in Pictures. Following an idea which first developed in France, pictures have been printed which, when viewed through spectacles, appear in stereoscopic relief. The object pictured is first photographed from two points like an ordinary stereoscopic view. Then the two pictures are printed In two complementary colors nearly but not quite overlapping. The glasses of the viewing spectacles are also of complementary colors corresponding to those used in the printing, and when the picture is seen through these glasses, ii stands forth with startling appearance of solidity.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921
Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

i HIGHLAND COUNTY DIRECTORY. County and District Officers: Henry W. Holt, Judge of Clicuit Court, Staunton, Ya, Terms of Court —4 th Tuesday In April, 2d Tuesday July, 2d Tuesday October. » Andrew I*. Jones, Commonwealth Attorney, Monterey, Va. W. H. Matheny, Clerk, Monterey, Va. W. N. Bird, Sheriff, Monterey, Va. H. M. Slaven, Treasurer, Monterey, Va. J. W. E. Lockridge, Commissioner of Revenue, Monterey, Va. I. L. Beverage, Co. Surveyor, Monterey, Va. Walter Mullenax, Supt. of Poor, Crab bottom, Va. R. E. Mauzy, Supt. of Schools, Ilightown, Va. John M. Colaw, Commissioner of accounts, Monterey, Va. Blue Grass District J. W. Ilevener, Supervisor (Chrm.) Hightown, Va. ;ee J. Wimer, Overseer of Poor, Crabbottom, Va. Ben H. Colaw, Constable, Crabbottom Va. D. O. Bird, Justice, Valley Center,Va. E. D. Swecker, Justice, Monterey,Rtl M. K. Simmons, Justice, Crabbottom, Monterey District. A. J. Terry, Supervisor, Trimble, Va. Arthur Hevener, Overseer of Poor, Monterey, Va. J. H. Samples, ...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

6ude Jcte xJb& A MULTI-MILLIONAIRE IS A MAN WHO HAS A GOOD LAWYER. <4 Q

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

The Highland Recorder and Thrice-a-Week World both for a |2.35, in advance. The year

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 Advertisements Column 4 [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Mention this iper in answering adv

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

No man ever became strong through lasting. No Store ever increased its sales by suspending advertising. Advertising is like food. It makes business grow. And NEWSPAPER advertising is the roast beef of advertising mediums. What about your store’s advertising menu? More advertising “food” will make your business healthier and more prosperous.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Shenandoah Purchase [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Shenandoah Purchase The National Forest Reserve Commission on February 24, 1921, made known of recent purchases on «he Phenai doah National Fora-.t aggregai np *'.5,537 acres. The tracts approved are distributed by counties as follows; Augusta County, two tracts aggregating 33, 984 acres; Rockingham County, three tracts aggregating 642 acres; Shenandoah County one tract of 600 acres; Hardy County, two tracts aggregating 269 acres; Frederick County, one tract of 42 acres. The largest single tract approved for the purchase was one of 34,000 aers lying in southwestern part of Augusta County, on Crawford and Elliot mountains. This tract, which contain large bodies of valuable timber, was offered for sale to the Gov eminent by the Augusta Wood Products Corporation. The other purchases are for the most part small interior tracts lying within the National Service desired to acquire in order to block up other acquired land. The purchase of the recently approved lands will bring the total ac...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
BEFORE SPRING COMES TONE UP YOUR BLOOD Your Blood Needs the Help of Gude’s Pep+o-Mangan in Springtime to Overcame Drowsy, Listless Feelings Called “Spring Fever Pale Faces Caused by Bad Blood That Tired, All-Gone Feeling a Dan . . ger Signal That Your Blood Needs This Splendid Tonic [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

BEFORE SPRING COMES TONE UP YOUR BLOOD Your Blood Needs the Help of Gude’s Pep + o-Mangan in Springtime to Overcame Drowsy, Listless Feelings Called “Spring Fever Pale Faces Caused by Bad Blood That Tired, All-Gone Feeling a Dan . . ger Signal That Your Blood Needs This Splendid Tonic The blood that courses through your body in the arteries and veins is of the most vital importance to the healthy life of the body. The little red corpuscles are what carry life to the millions of cells that make up your body. The blood is also the vehicle that carries away most, if not all, of the waste products. Springtime is the season when the body adjusts itself from the rigors of winter to the heat of summer. You notice how much sickness there is in the Spring? Perhaps there are weeks when you feel drowsy and listless,, and you call it “Spring Fever.’Tt is really your blood that has become weak and thin, and It needs help. Take that good blood tonic — Gufle's Pepto-Mangan. It will give you the re...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Entertainment [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 4 March 1921

Entertainment There will be an entertainment by the Pine Grove school, Friday night, March 11th after which the teachers and young ladies of the school re going to have some fine lunches to sell. The proceeds will go toward purchasing a library for the school. Admission will be, adults 10c, chil -dren sc. We invite the public to £ome and help a good cause. Committee

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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