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Elephind.com contains 3,238 items from University News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 5 November 2003

S November 5, 2003 The University News Sports Omeros illuminated under riday Night Lights The parking lot for Texas Stadium was full of cars last Friday night. It couldn't be the Cowboys. Was it a concert, I wondered? "High school football. They have their playoffs there," sophomore Will Frank said. Fligh school football under the lights of Texas Stadium. The thrill of the thing boggles my mind. I can still remember my high school playoff games on the humble tundra of Minnesota. If you were lucky enough to make it to the title game, you played in the Metrodome. Those playoff games were a thrill. Before the game I remember a sort of dryness in the throat, an extra-quick pumping of the Patrick Kavanagh, Irish Poet. (www. irishaboard. com) heart. When the game was on, it was different. The senses felt sharper. There was this feeling not-quite explainable. But after a well-executed play, it was there, full and encompassing the huddle you stood in with your other 10 teammates. It was the...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 5 November 2003

November 5, 2003 The University News Sports Hoggies decimate rival SMU for Halloween treat Michael Q'Keefe Rugby Correspondent The Groundhogs took the field Friday night against the cross-town rival SMU Mus- tangs. This game epitomized the spirit of conference rugby. Both teams came out strong, and the ball went back and forth for most of the half. After 30 minutes of indecisive posses- sions, Danny Mehaffey kicked a penalty to put the Hoggies up by three, and the fans cheered. UD kept the ball in front of SMU's try zone unable to bang it in for a try. The Groundhogs settled for another penalty kick, Mehaffey's second, and the fans cheered. In the last minutes of the half, SMU carried the ball deep into UD territory, but the Hoggie defense kept them at bay. In the last drive of the half, UD drew a penalty giving SMU the ball 10 meters out. R.J. Karas knocked the banger out of bounds spoiling SMU's last chance in the half. The second half started with an SMU knock-on off the UD kick ...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 5 November 2003

s November 5, 2003 The University News Fea- 1 H silent, t by Karen Schuberg Contributing Writer Editors Note: This is the first part in a three-part series on depression. Depression is on the rise. The myriad newspaper and magazine articles detail- ing this distressing mental illness help confirm statistics that indicate depression's international increase over the past several decades. Depression, a once little-understood disease, is today a term almost as well-known as the com- mon cold. Yet with all its publicity, depression can be a cause of great confusion. As depression is blamed for a wide va- riety of health problems, it is necessary to di stinguish between simply feeling depressed and being clinically depressed. Most people feel depressed at one time or another. Death of a loved one, loss of a job, and life's other hurdles can prompt feelings of loneliness, disappointment, and sadness; it is not unreasonable to feel depressed at such happenings. But if intense sadness persi...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 5 November 2003

The University News November 5, 2003 9 ures pression do, in fact, go to Rome. After treatment with medication and counseling, they recover their emotional health and are quite able to manage die traveling. Why UD Students Are Prone To Depression In general, the typical candidate for depression is some one who is very bright and has high expectations. "UD has excellent students; trying to keep on top of homework and balance their social lives depletes their energy," Hobbs said. Hobbs said the intense studying leaves little time for exercise and sleep, resulting in many students feeling more acutely the stress from UD's rigorous academic environment. "You're not alone. Many, many students get de- pressed. And I am very hopeful; we have the resources to help you get better," she said. John Grant, director of resident life, said there were 28 diagnosed cases of depression at UD last year. Com- pared to statisti cs of the general population, that is not high. "Depression is a serious iss...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 5 November 2003

10 November 5, 2003 The University News Commentary Editorial \USTlT/r News Editorial Board Jason Butler Meghan Kuckelman Rebecca Leland Jodi Dickens Letters Policy The University News invites letters on all subjects; however, we will not print unsigned submissions. Letters must be received in the new sroom or at uncw s a acad. udallas.edu before noon on Friday for publication the following Wednesday. Letters are limited to 350 words and may be edited for grammar, length or clarity. Longer submissions may be considered for publication as a separate commentary. Commentary Policy The University News is seeking articles for submission to the commentary page. Any subject or issue may be considered for commentary, and anyone is welcome to submit a commentary, though The University News especially encourages students, faculty and administrators to participate. Articles should be well-written, thoughtful, and between 600 and 900 words in length. The University News reserves the right to edi...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 5 November 2003

November 5, 2003 The University News 11 Commentary Want reasons to celebrate? Look no further There are always those websites that make you wonder. No, not contemplate the mean- ing of life or reexamine your re- lationship with your inner child—we "re talking websites that make you think, "Who has the time for this?" You've seen them. The ones you enjoy but can't believe someone has the time or inclination to put it together. Even as you smile, you wonder "Why0" Although, its is nice that someone has pro- vided this entertainment for you. In the true tradition of college procrastination, we stumbled upon just such a website: www.hidates.com. You know Talk-like-a-Pirate Day? Hidates has a random holiday for every day of every month. We kid you not. Thus, as we stand on the brink of the lovely month of November, we give you some "holidays" to bear in mind when studying is no longer cause for celebration. Apparently, the actual holi- day of Thanksgiving has in- spired the theme for the...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 5 November 2003

17 November 5, 2003 The University News Commentary Greek letter societies: a bandwagon going nowhere UD's unique community would be harmed by social fraternities by Eileen Gregory English Professor A conventional Greek male fraternity - like those in colleges everywhere - has begun on campus. This action is. I believe, a serious mistake, and one that ought not to have been casually initiated without a larger discussion of the question, involving more than the staff of the Student Life office. Because, of course, when one of these societies conies, an unlimited number of others may come, after the precedent of this one. This is the fact that we must directly confront. So that the issue is not Phi Kappa Tau: it is whether we want to accept a paradigm shift in defining student life in terms of Greek societies. At this point I think it is important to ask why the University of Dallas has avoided joining the fraternity/sorority culture during the whole of its life until now, and what its...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 5 November 2003

November 5, 2003 The University News 13 Commentary Second Amendment deserves fair hearing by Teri Rockenhaus Guest Columnist When many people think of supporters of the Second Amendment and of people such as Charlton Heston and Ted Nugent, they form images in their mind of big, beer-bellied, and potentially dangerous gun- toting rednecks. Michael Moore's documentary Bowling for Columbine, which claims to be about America's so-called "love affair" with firearms, goes so far as to suggest that gun owners are racist, mentally unstable, or somehow less enlightened than the rest of society. Director Spike Lee even announced publicly on one occasion that then NRA President Charlton Heston ought to be shot with a .44 caliber weapon. Of course^ other groups that claim to stand for the protection of important constitutional nghts are rarely subject to this kind of public scrutiny. The Second Amendment is under assault by groups who deeply misunderstand the reasoning of the framers of the Con...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 5 November 2003

14 November 5, 2003 The University News Arts & Entertainment Gooding, Jolie disappoint, but Scott still scares by FS Movie Reviewer Cuba Gooding, Jr. once won an Oscar, but you'd never know it from his recent string of flops and embarrassments, which now includes Radio (wide release), a mawkish bit of true-life uplift that would be more at home as a TV movie-of-the-week. Gooding plays the title character, a mentally challenged young fellow whom a principled high school football coach (Ed Harris) makes his unofficial assistant, much to the chagrin of some of the boosters— particularly the arrogant town banker, whose son happens to be a star on the team. The ending is utterly predictable. The picture is well intentioned, but it's crudely manipulative, and the stars" styles clash so blatantly—with Gooding overdoing everything and Harris playing the stoic man of integrity—that they seem to be in different films. The problem with this Radio is that you can't turn it off. Epic romance...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 5 November 2003

November 5, 2003 The University News 15 Arts & Entertainment Guide tcarts heater Nov. 4-9, Dallas Sum- mer Musicals' Broadway Contemporary Series: A Tuna Christmas Nov. 4-8, Eisemarin's Theatre Comedy Series: Maybe Baby, It's You Nov. 5-9, Deep Ellum Ensemble: Doctor Tedrow's Last Breath Nov. 6-22, Echo The- atre: Kindertransport Nov. 7-22, ICT MainStage: The Odd Couple Nov. S-Dec.14, Kitchen Dog Theater: The Danube Nov. 11-16, Dallas Summer Musicals' Broad- way Series: A Night With Dame Edna Nov. 11-16, Black Acad- emy of Arts & Letters: Why Did I Get Married Music Dance Nov. 21-23, Moscow Ballet, Majestic Theatre: The Great Russian Nut- cracker Nov. 28-30, Chamber- lain Ballet, Eisemann Can- ter: The Nutcracker Visual Art Nov. 5-Dec. 6, Pollock Gallery SMU: The Solitary Shape: Drawings and Prints by Nathan Oiiveira Nov. 5-22, UNT Art Gal- lery: Ceramics USA 2003 Nov. 5-May 9, African American Museum: Sugar and Spice: Black Dolls from the Dr. Regenia Peryy Collection and Bl...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 5 November 2003

16 November 5, 2003 The University News Back Page c \ ednesday - Deadline to sign up for Battle of the Bands, in SALC - Career Development Workshop: 12:15-12:45 p.m. in SALC conference room. This week: resume writing F, riday 7th - Residence Assistant applications due in Office of Student Life - First Friday Mass: 7:30 p.m. at Cistercian Abbey, Collegium Cantorum will sing. - Opening of Haggerty Gallery Exhibition Frag- ments by graduate stu- dent Robyn Stoller, through Dec. 3, in the Haggerty Gallery s aturday 8th - Battle of the Bands and Chili Cook-off - Landregan Lecture: The Ossuary of James and Its Implications, by Father Joseph Fitzmyer, S.J., at 7:30 p.m. in Lynch Audito- rium - Prospective student visit weekend M onday 10th - Deadline for changes on Spring housing and meal plans - On-line registration for spring semester begins. Packets ready to be picked up in registrar's office. - Stem Cell Lecture: Stem Cells and Cloning: Understanding the Scien- tific Issues and the Mor...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 12 November 2003

Untversi PallaS. ews Volume XXXIII, Number 10 University of Dallas, Irvifig, Texas November 12, 2003 Student life withdraws support for fraternity by Rebecca Leland News Editor Student Life has withdrawn its support of the previously approved Phi Kappa Tau fraternity. The decision was based on what Dr Fred Zuker, vice president and dean of student services, felt was right for the university at this time in its history. "Right now I just don't think it's a good time for us to be pursuing something that's going to cause a great deal of divisiveness on this campus. That's my concern and that's the reason I made the decision I did. Not to contravene the process, but simply to say in J Dr. Fred Zuker, dean of student services: "I felt this was riot a prudent time for us to be pursuing a social fraternity." my best judgment I felt this was not a prudent time for us to be pursuing a social fraternity," he said. Some faculty members and administrators had reservations and concerns about the...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 12 November 2003

November 12, 2003 The University News News News Editor in Chief Meghan Kuckelman News Editor Rebecca Leland Assistant News Editor Lmcy George Features Editor Jodi Dickens Commentary Editor Jason Butler Arts & Entertainment Editor Luisa Torres Sports Editor Zach Czaia Photo Editor Louis Shopen Advertising Manager Anton Hartmann Webmaster Margaret Ballard Student Assistant Debbie Sterbin Editorial Advisers Dr. Joe Norton Dr. Frank Swietek The University News is the weekly student newspaper of the University of Dallas, 1845 E. Northgate Dr., #732, Irving, TX, 75062. Subscriptions are $20 a semester or $35 a year. The University News i s also available online at www.udallas.edu/unews. Issues from the past two years are archived on the website. To advertise in Tine University News, please call (972)721-5089 or fax query to (972) 721-4136. Ads must be submitted by Thursday at 5 p.m. for publication the following Wednesday Lead by example, Galante says Bishop discusses leadership and c...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 12 November 2003

November 12, 2003 The University News News Ossuary CONT. FROM PAGE 1 on the implications of the in- scription of this important, an- cient object;' he said. Fitzmyer divided die complex topic of his speech into five rel- evant issues: the ossuary's au- thenticity, problems posed by the Aramaic language, the three names of the inscription, the meaning of the word brother, and the implications of the ossuary's inscription. The first issue, whether the ossuary's inscription was really made around the first century A.D. or was a modem forgery, is probably the one that sparks the most controversy, since not only is the origin of the ossuary in question, but because there have been conflicting reports made by separate groups of ex- aminers An ossuary, by definition, is a stone box about two feet long, which Jews from about 20 B.C. to 70 A. D. used to keep the bones of the deceased safe after remov- ing them from the original burial cave. These boxes were often artisti- cally adorned, usua...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 12 November 2003

4 November 12, 2003 The University News News Approval CONT. FROM PG 1 Whether the Phi Kappa Tau group actually received approval is a point on which not all parties agree. Student Life personnel affirm that they had given it the "stamp of approval," but this approval was given before the fraternity appeared before the student senate. "There's a very real chance it may not have been approved by the student senate,"' Zuker said. Thomas Yep, vice president of Student Government and chair of the charter and appropriations committee, made no predictions, but said that the approval process had been still ongoing at the time Student Life gave its approval. "We were going about it [giving approval to a club] in the proper manner... but we have authorities and they stepped in," Yep said. Adam Curtis, one of the founders of the fraternity interest group, took issue with the way the organization's dissolution was handled by administrators, including the manner in which they were informed. "Off...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 12 November 2003

November 12, 2003 The University News News Stevens Wordsworth Dickinson Frost cumnungs umor CPoei: ran3cen(Jincjf the hyp efrSofeJ by Abbie Sparks Contributing Writer It's that time of year again. Don't be surprised if some of your friends begin to look quite pale, seem shaky and nervous, or walk around muttering to themselves. The paleness is from long hours in the dusty back corners of either the SMU or UD library. The shakiness is from large doses of caffeine, and the muttering is probably lines of poetry. That's right- panel exams for Junior Poet have begun. That means all junior English major are under more academic pressure right now than they have probably ever been in their lives. Junior Poet, a well-known milestone in the English major, requires incoming juniors—fresh from Rome, and possibly still somewhat sophomoric—to read, comprehend, analyze, and annotate until any underclassman-like intellectual immaturity is forcibly wrung out of them, and they are completely saturate...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 12 November 2003

6 November 12, 2003 The University News Arts & Entertainment Matrix' plods, Bear moseys, Stain stumbles by FS Movie Reviewer Fraternal writer-directors Andy and Larry Wachowski conclude their hugely popular trilogy in a resounding thud with The Matrix Revolutions (wide release). Keanu Reeves returns as Neo, the so-called Chosen One, whose destiny is to do battle with the machines that keep most of mankind in their thrall. This time he and leather-bound girlfriend Trinity must travel to the machine capital and confront the rapidly multiplying Agent Smith (Hugo Weaving) while a major battle rages over the future of Zion, the last human city. Unfortunately the piece is played with almost laughable solemnity, suggesting that the makers actually believe their own hype about their films" profundity. The combination of mindless action and pomposity makes The Matrix Revolutions, despite its slick surface, both pretentious and puerile. Courtesy of Warner Bros. Neo (Keanu Reeves) and Agen...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 12 November 2003

November 12, 2003 The University News 7 Arts & Entertainment Artists note t ^RAGMENT^ ordinary life by Maryclaire Becan Contributing Writer Review i v i II Top: Nancy Ferro's The Ox and the Frog and Pled Piper Bunny, both mixed media on canvas. Below: Deborah Herrings Waterfall, paper and fiber. At first glance, the materials that make up the art of Nancy Ferro, Deborah Herring, Ellen Frances Tuchman, and Caroline Waite look like the inside of someone's kitchen junk drawer. Scraps of fabric, old receipts, buttons, broken pieces of porcelain figures:, torn pages from ancient children's books, and antique matchbooks make up the art. These artists, however, have managed to take neglected pieces of human life and create an aesthetically pleasing exhibit on display starting this week in the Haggerty Gallery. Among Herring's works is apiece called Waterfall, made up of several long strings of sewn together magazine squares. Another, Security, is a block of receipts, connected similarl...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 12 November 2003

8 November 12, 2003 The University News Feati by Monica Oberlin Contributing Writer Tattoos: who's getting them, what are they getting, and what would possess a person to poke little holes in their body and fill them with ink? "They definitely are a form of art," Jenny Loftus, a tattooed freshman, said. Many young people agree with her and add that tattoos are not only a walk on the wild side of cosmetics but are also a way to express what is important to them personally, "I wouldn't put anything on my body, like a tattoo, that didn't have meaning for me," Art Aguirre, a freshman at UD who has two tattoos derived from his religious beliefs, said. He said he got them as "a personal reminder for me" Aguirre's shoulders display a cross encircled with the crown of thorns and a large dove symbolizing the Holy Spirit. He got them both done within the past year in El Paso. They each cost $120, which he considers a good deal for the level of craftsmanship. Tattoos or "tats" (to quote the po...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The University News — 12 November 2003

The University News November 12, 2003 9 JRES 3ody art goes mainstream think body modifications, especially piercing and tattoos, have become so popular because getting them doesn't have any stigma attached to it as it used to," he said in Xtreme Body Mod. 'The negativity attached to it has dissipated because people from all walks of life are getting into it. The labels have faded somewhat." Loftus fre shm an with a skull on her ankle, agrees and points out the irony of the fact. "I think they're popular because people think it's alternative or rebellious to get one, which is silly because they're pretty trendy now," she said. Loftus's tattoo even has a name. It is called Mr. Skull, which is a doodle she drew for friends in high school. She got it last August for $65 at a parlor called Jack and Diane's, She emphasized looking for cleanliness when deciding on a place to get a tattoo. Agreeing that tattooing oneself is addictive, she has elaborate plans for her next one, which include ...

Publication Title: University News, The
Source: The Portal to Texas History
Country/State of Publication: Texas, United States
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