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Title: Children's Newspaper, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 719 items from Children's Newspaper, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HOW I MADE A PAIR OF STOCKINGS. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

How I MADE A PAIR or STOCKINGS. Besicles many other things, I have made a pair of stockings ; but I will describe them, as I think they are most interesting. In the first place, I had to procure three skeins of wool and four knitting needles. Then I set up twenty two stitches on each of three needles, leaving one needle to work with. For the rib I knitted two purl and two plain. I worked round and round till it was long enough for the upper part of the leg, and narrowed it for the calf by taking three stitches at once on each sale of the seamstitch. When the entire leg was long enough, I divided half the stitches on to one needle for the heel, the other half on two needles for the front part of the foot. I then went on to work the heel, one row plain and one row purl alternately, until it was three inches long. After that I narrowed the heel and proceeded to pick up the stitches at the side of the heel to form a gusset. I worked round and round and took up the stitches at the other ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW I MADE A PUDDING AND A DRESS. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

How I MADE A PUDDING AND A DRESS. A Plum Pudding : iib. suet, ¿lb. flour, Jib. breadcrumbs, Jib. raisins, Alb. cur- rants, ^lb. candied peel, 'lo/., almonds, 2 eggs, and a little milk. Weigh the flour and put it into a basin, cut up the suet and mix thoroughly with the flour, then add the breadcrumbs, raisins, currants, candied peel, and blanched almonds, mix everything well together, beat up the eggs and mix with the pudding, put enough milk to make it into a paste, put it into a buttered basin, tie a cloth over the top and boil for eight hours. A Child's Dress : First buy either 20yds. of double width or 3£yds. of single width dress material. Cut out the yoke and sleeves, then cut the length of the dress, join the shoulder seams of the yoke together, face the back and sew on the hooks and eyes, then run up the sleeves and put them into a cuff. Hem the bot- tom of the dress, gather it along the top and put it into the yoke, put in the sleeves and overseam them, sew on some huttons,...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW I MADE A RAG MAT. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

How I MADE A RAG MAT. I will tell you about a rag mat which made. It is made of pieces of rag, which are placed in rows of different colors, fastened to a piece of canvas. In the centre is the shape of a horse-shoe, which is made of blue pieces. The mat is about 2£ feet long and 1J feet wide. First I took a piece of canvas, the size before stated The edge of this I bound round with pieces of rag two inches long and one inch wide, which I had joined together, end for end. Then I marked the shape of a horse-shoe in the centre of the canvas with a pencil. I made holes through the canvas where I had marked the horse-shoe, and then took the pieces of Vdue rag, about two inches long and one inch wide, which I had prepared, and pulled one end down through one hole and up through another, this left both ends standing up on the right side. I kept repeating this until I had finished the horse-shoe. Next I made rows of holes straight across and put the rags in the same as I did in the horse-sh...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHATTER PAGE [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

When we began this page, last July, we offered a prize for the best letter sent in during the succeeding six months as an inducement to readers to cultivate the almost forgotten art of epistolary composition. When we read the admirable letters of the first half of the century, we are lost in admiration of their easy English, their keen observation, and fluent des- cription of men and things. People travelled less in those days, books were less common, and when nowadays we send a newspaper to give our distant friends " all the news," our grandfathers had to play a " special correspondent's " part, and transcribe it with a quill pen on big quarto folio sheets of heavy, hand-made note paper. The best letter we got came from Edith Hazel, Bongongolong, and was printed in the October number of the CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER, consequently the prize goes to her, with our best wishes for her future advancement. In writing my last editor's note I feel some sorrow in abandoning what has been a pleas...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW I MADE A CAKE. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

How I MADE A CAKE. First I took four tablespoonfuls of sugar, which had first had all the lumps broken, and put it in a basin with three tablespoonfuls of melted butter. These were well beaten together, and then I added one egg well beaten and two table- spoonfuls of milk. Then I added the flour with one teaspoonful of baking powder, well mixed in it. You want to add enough to make it into a dough stiff enough to roll out. Then I rolled it out on a well floured board and cut out into little round cakes. Then I dipped each cake in sugar and baked them in a hot oven till they were a light-brown. J. H. A.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

BOVRIL!! Thc most Nourishing: and Valuable LIQUID FOOD eyer discovered. One teaspoonful makes a delicious cup of Beef Tea. Ordinary Beef Tea is a stimulant only. BOVRIL is BEEF in Solution ; FOOD as well as Stimulant. BOVRIL is prescribed by Medical men all over the world. BOVRIL is sold in all the respectable hotels in London. BOVRIL is dispensed in all the Hospitals, and BOVRIL is sold at 150,000 shops in Great Britain. BOVRIL surpasses everything in maintaining strength and building up weak consti- tutions. RANKIN «Sc CO. Bovril Representatives, >¿4fr v>-v r s' HEET STONEY

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

First I must introduce myself : I am made of steel, sharpened edges, and an affair to catch hold of by and use it. There are several kinds of scissors, each having their own peculiarity. One of the tribe is called " buttonhole scissors," and by fixing an arrangement in the centre you lessen the size of the bite. Others are "nail scissors," useful because they have a file on one side to rub off the raw edges of the nails after they are cut. " Pocket scissors " are small, and fold up, go in a little case, and are able to be put in the pocket. Schoolmistresses (sewing ones) and dressmakers and tailors have very large ones. Ordinary scissors are just ordinary ones ; neither too large nor too small, but just right. " Shears " are a kind of scissors, very large and used for garden purposes. Dressmakers, mothers, and even big sisters could not get on very well without scissors. A pair of scissors have to be kept sharp, as blunt ones always leave the edges of the material jagged. If " nail ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

The main source of the amber supply is the sea coast of the Baltic. It is fossil gum, originally the exudation of a species of conifer now extinct. This grew thousands of years ago on the marshy coasts of Northern Europe, when the climate was much warmer than it is to-day. Thc immense forests of amber pine underwent decay.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SCISSORS AND ITS USES. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

SCISSORS AND ITS USES. This, the second of Mr. Jno Baker's prizes to the readers of the CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER, brought an overwhelming number of replies, of which, very few fell below the 60 per cent. mark. Comparing the girls' essays with the boys' recent Essay on a Knife, the gi. ls show a higher average, a bette.' literary finish, and a closer and more analytical grasp of their subj oct. Perhaps that is to be expected boys have more out-door amuse- ments, and perhaps more work to attend to than girls, and conse- quently less time to give to their lessons. Another marked difference-all the girls treated the subject from the solemnly earnest point of view, with the one solitary exception of the little lass who gave her doll soldier scissors instead of a sword; while many of the boys displayed considerable humour in their knife essays, although it was not always relevant to the subject in hand. But perhaps there is more fun to be got out of a knife than a pair of scissors ; or is it ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW I MADE A PIGEON CAGE. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

How I MADE A PIGEON CAGE. One of the things I have made with my own hands is a pigeon cage. For its con- struction I procured a strong deal box made of the wood of an American tree pine. I then stopped the cracks up with putty to keep it dry. I then cut what is called the bob-hole, which is made to enable the bird to go in and out of the box. I then put a shelf underneath that to make it easier. After that I made the nests, two in number, at the back of the cage and filled them with straw, and I also put a piece of wood to keep it from falling out. They should be cleaned out once every week, and the bottom of the box to be covered with sand. The door is cut out at the bottom of the box and fastened by two hinges, either made of leather or iron ; the leather ones are the simplest, easiest, and cheapest. The best thing for pigeons to eat is corn or wheat. Their drinking cup is made of stone, and should be cleaned thoroughly out at least once a week. The wire used fr»- fha ni.T eli rm ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE INDIARUBRER SUPPLY. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

THE INDI ARUBRER SUPPLY. The United States Consul at Para has reported upon Iiis recent journey in the region of the Amazon. Referring to the impression that the rubber production is constantly increasing, and that it will continue to do so, Mr. Kennedy says : It is not generally believed, but it is, nevertheless, a fact, that the output is not likely to increase to any marked degree unless a much larger force of rubber gatherers is sent into the forest than has been employed during the past year or two. This is the opinion of the best-informed rubber plantation owners. Reports that the supply of rubber tree is inexhaustible are largely overdrawn. It is true that there is no fear of imme- diate scarcity of rubber, and perhaps there will not be for the next fifty years. It is believed in well-informed circles that hereafter there will be a gradual but steady shrinkage in the rubber pro- duct unless the present force of rubber gatherers is hugely increased, because, in the first place...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

-- Scissors are made of steel, mostly cast steel. There are three parts of a scissors viz. : the bows, shank, and the blades. The bows are where the fingers are put through to work the blades, the shank is the part between the bows and the blades ; the blades are used to cut with. The shank of the blade is hollowed a little so as they will fit in ; they are then fastened together with a screw which enables them to be moved to and fro. Scissors are very useful for cutting out clothes and papers, cutting strings, for making paper flowers and leather flowers,, and for many other things. Drapers use scissors for cutting off lengths of materials ; barbers use scissors some- times to cut hair with. Nurses and doctors use them for cutting bandages for the patients' wounds. Sometimes there is a small, notched ring resembling a spur-roller on one of the bows, this is used for marking out the shape of a pattern on any material. There are small scissors for making button-holes with, tlicy are ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

For Who¿P£*hCoughs and^ Chest Colds, RQW>g EMBROCATION.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FOREIGN NEWS [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

The administration of the Pelew? Caroline, and Lad rone groups of islands in the north-west Pacific have been attached to German New Guinea. The French press insists on the necessity of at once deciding the fate of the New Hebrides. They say the country is in a state of anarchy. Osman Digna is said to be dead. No man has so often been reported a prisoner or a corpse as Osman, but this time it is said to be true. France and Russia are said to be intriguing against British interests with the Emperor Menelik.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRIZE LETTER. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

PRIZE LETTER. Decir Editor, -As you invited me to send you a description of our school, I am now going to begin. In the first place, although only a small Provisional school, with only seventeen scholars, oar school has rather a striking name, as you see. In a way it is also a noted name, 'or you will find it mentioned in Paterson's ?.Those Names." But you will say that all this has nothing to do with the story I promise'! to write, but before I start I must describ . the school. It is situate'1 on a ^ack track (a sort of anabranch) of the road from Gundagai to Cootamundra, on the brow of a hill, a lict'e over ten miles from Gundagai. There are twenty acres of land belonging to the school, but only two acres, which form a .- quare around the school, are fenced in-the fence being a post and two-railed one. This is our playground. .Many improvements have been made since our present teacher came, the year before 1 ist. Before lie came the playground \va^ covered with scrub, except for ...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

Price List of BROOKS'S New Standard Publications. The following are the prices of our New ¡Standard Publications, which are obtainable from all Booksellers, Newsagents, and Storekeepers, or direct from the Publishers : Brooks's New Standard Geographies. s. d. No. 1.-Geography for Third Class ... ... ... ... 0 9 No. 2. ,, Fourth Class ... ... ... ... 0 9 No. 3. ,, Fifth Class ... ... ... ... 1 6 With a large number of Maps and Illustrations. Brooks's New Standard English Histories. No. 1.-English History for Third Class ... .. ... 1 0 No. 2.-English History for Upper Third Class ... ... 1 0 No. 3.-English History for Fourth Class ... ... ... 1 0 No. 4.-English History for Fifth Class ... ... ... ...10 SpelUng Books and Pupils' Aids to Brooks's Readers. Spelling Book and Aid to First Reader ... .. ... ... 0 2 ,, ,, Second Reader .. ... .02 Third Reader ... ... ... 0 3 ,, ,, Fourth Reader ... ... ... 0 3 Fifth Reader... ... . . ... 0 6 Illustrated Method for easily Learning or Teaching...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEWS OF THE EMPIRE [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

The end of the Boer War seems as far off as ever. .Lord Roberts has formed hisbody guard fi'om the colonial contingents. Sir Charles Warren, after occupy ing Spion Kop for one day, is re ported to have recrossed The Tugela The splendid response of the British Army Reserves, and the enthusiasm of the Colonial Volun- teers have shown the European nations that Britain consists of more than a few small islands off the coast of France. John Ruskin, the famous art writer and critic, is dead. No man has done more than he to form the art expression of the nineteenth century.

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

WHY PAY FOR A WATCH ? CAN YOU READ THIS? f_A J_S_*L*D_ 1 S*LV*R I W*T*H \ I ¡ G**N I JT I I 1 ~GU*S"S I R*G*T I & I B*Y | A | CH**N In order to introduce our Business into every Household in Australia, we undertake and gua- rantee to give away one of our World-famed £2 10s. Solid Silver Keyless Hunter Watches, LADY'S or GENTLEMAN'S, to every reader who sends the Correct Reading of the above Puzzle. CONDITIONS.-That your answer to the Puzzle is correct, and that you further undertake, if correct, to purchase one of our Solid Silver Single or Double Chains. Send Stamped Addressed Envelope for Reply. ADDRESS-THE MANAGER The GLOBE WATCH COMPANY, Ltd., 105 PITT-STREET, SYDNEY

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Brooks's New Standard... ENGLISH HISTORY.. For FIFTH Class. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

Brooks's New Standard . . . ENGLISH H18T0RY . . For FIFTH Class. At the suggestion of several Principal Teachers of Superior Public Schools, we have published an ENGLISH HISTORY for the FIFTH CLASS. This book aims at giving, in plain and simple language, a brief outline of English History from the Accession of Wiliiam III. to the present date, describing the leading features of the important events, leaving the teacher to supply such further details as he may consider desirable. A few introductory chapters give a brief survey of English History before 1688, whilst supplementary chapters deal with England's Industrial Development, Trade and Commerce, Imperial Expansion, etc. This History is suitable not only for Fifth Class pupils, but also for Candidates for the Public Service Examinations ; for Pupil Teachers under the Department of Public Instruction ; for Candidates for the Chamber of Commerce examinations, the examinations of the Bankers' Institute, and for the University Junior...

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OUR LAST ISSUE. [Newspaper Article] — The Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

OUR LAST ISSUE. THE CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER has completed its trial year, and we have to announce to our numerous young readers that we cannot see our way to start another volume. The C. N. is only a comparatively small production, but small as it is, the tax on our editor's time has been too great, and even editors get wearied when they have too much work to do. lt is quite pos- sible that at some future time we may revive the CHILDREN'S NEWS- PAPER, as we find it exceedingly pleasant to cater for the Little Folk. Meanwhile, we shall keep up the connection with them through the medium of our many School Books, which are in use in every Public School in New South Wales. For the present, then, the Editor bids his young friends ADIEU !

Publication Title: Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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