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Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Doctors Recommend —GAS FIRES Used by 3 out of every 4 Medical men in England .... by 90 per cent, of tbe hospitals, nursing homes, etc., in London .... by Sydney hospitals, .... by Government Institutions .... by leading citizens .... and, more important still, recommended by some of the world's leading medical experts. That is the unique position occupied by the modern gas fire to-day. Medical men recommend these fires because their warmth is the nearest approach to the Sun's rays; because they are a definite safeguard against chills, colds, nasal irritation, etc., and other ailments which arise from unhygienic room warming; because they maintain a perfect system of ventilation, and thus prevent the air from becoming dry or polluted .... because they are healthier than most room warmers .... because their sunlike radiant rays are absorbed by the body and do not heat the air like ordinary room warmers. Special Offer 20/- for fixing If house pipes are suitable Free Fitting If gas is ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
FOR MOTHERS AND YOUNG WIVES CAN WOMEN COOK? [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

FOR MOTHERS AND YOUNG WIVES               by A DOCTOR CAN WOMEN COOK? A VIOLENT at- tack is made on the cooking of wo- men in a book just published in London and written by a specialist, so well-known that his ac- cusation cannot be ignored. "Cookery is an art of arts," he says, and goes on to say that women have not studied the question scientifically, accus- ing them of insisting on cooking things that have no right to be cooked. In this category come fruit and certain vege- tables. The author puts it: "Even the kindly fruits of the earth are so thor- oughly baked, boiled and stewed as altogether to deprive them of their main nutritious merit, vitamins and salts." There is no doubt that the subject of food should be an integral part of the education of every girl. It is apparently hopeless to expect a male educational expert to see this, nor an unenterprising education department to support ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Why Can't THOSE BRILLIANT GIRLS Marry? Too Old— Or Too Clever! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Why Can't THOSE BRILLIANT GIRLS Marry?         Too Old— Or Too Clever! Why is it that so many Uni- versity women never marry? The figures quoted recently by Professor Harvey Sutton, show- ing that in America 100 Univer- sity women in forty years pro- duced only 80 children, are fairly representative of Australian Uni- versity women also. Are University degrees or ex- ceptional intellectual attainments a marriage handicap to even at- tractive girls? The author of this article thinks they may well be. Before her marriage she was acting-lecturer in history at Syd- ney University, and tutor in Eng- lish literature at the University of Melbourne. By KATHLEEN PITT, B.A. (Oxon., Melb.) DO University women marry? Well, some of them do and some of them don't, and those that don't are mostly school-teachers. A University training is for all girls a heavy handicap in the marriage market. The average young man is alarmed when he learns that th...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Young Japan Defines The Sauso-Banana [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Young Japan Defines The Sauso-Banana WHAT is the difference between a banana and a sausage? Possibly few readers could equal the humorous effort of a Japanese school- boy who, in his early studies of the English language, wrote the following delightful essay, reprinted without any apologies : "The banana are great remark- able fruit. He are constructed in the same architectural style as sausage, difference being skin of sausage are habitually consumed, while it is not advisable to eat wrapping of banana. "The banana are held aloft while consuming: sausage are usually left in reclining position. Sausage de- pend for creation on human being or stuffing machine while banana are Pristine Product of honorable mother nature. In case of sausage both conclusions are attached to the other sausage; banana on other hands are attached on one end to stem and opposite termination en- tirely loose. Finally, banana are strictly of vegetable kingdom while affiliation of sausage often undecided."

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Military Uniforms of Other Days [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Military Uniforms of Other Days Uniforms, medals, and a fanfare of trumpets to greet the patron, Major General Sir Charles Rosenthal, helped to put a sparkle into the 37th anniver- sary regimental ball of the 36th Bat- talion. On the stage, awaiting the ar- rival of the guest of honor, was an in- teresting group of six soldiers dressed in uniform of different periods. The earliest of these uniforms, worn when the battalion was first founded by the Hon. Lieut.-Col. Cash Neild in 1897, was of bright red with the busby (or in summer the white helmet). The khaki uniform, puttees, and bandolier many recognised as the uniform worn during the South African War. With the khaki breeches and shirt of the compulsory training uniform nearly all present were familiar; but there was no one in the hall who did not recognise the khaki of our Diggers. Now this uniform is changed, and the up-to-the-minute style shows no high breast pockets, the tunic is more fitting, and the collar and cuffs are gree...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR—What's It Worth? [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

ADVANCE AUSTRALIA FAIR—What's It Worth? By ROBERT C. McCALL In complain- |There is no ing that many |doubt that |some 33 years     members of his       audience ne- |South Wales, at       glect to stand or |any rate, has led remove their |to the general hats when "Ad- |adoption of "Ad- |vance, Australia vance, Australia |Fair" as the Fair" is played, |proper song for |ceremonial occa     Mr. Lang has |sions, and the one raised the ques- |which spontane- |ously springs               tion of its |from the lips of claims to be re- |most people when garded as a na- |national senti- tional song. |ment is to be |expressed.   But is it worthy? Can "Advance, Aus- tralia Fair" be officially regarded as our national song? Could it be replaced in public favor by a...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
the mirror of SYDNEY [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

        SEVERAL of the girls at the Ravens- wood ex-students' dance for the Cot Fund at the Children's Hospital (Cam- perdown) had their frocks so much cut away at the back and corsage that seve- ral youths, not so sophisticated as the average, whispered to their partners, "Let's dance closely behind her so I can see how it stays on." To them, as with many others, it was little short of a miracle that the gowns remained on the wearers at all. Miss Mabel Fidler, who entertained the guests of honor, has been the president of the union since its inauguration 22 years ago. * * * DETERMINED to make a success of her party, Mrs. Arthur Bryant engaged two rooms at the Pickwick Club for her bridge party and musicale to raise funds for St. Anne's annual ball. Music-lovers went into one room and card enthu- siasts enjoyed their games in peace and quiet in another room. SURELY at the Court of Louis XV there were not more lovely ladies in white...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Woman Engineer On The Job Experimenting With Television: WOMEN IN BUSINESS.—No. 1. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Woman Engineer On The Job Experimenting With Television WOMEN IN BUSINESS.—No. 1. "Give me a screw-driver and some- thing to fix, and I'm happy." SO says Mrs. F. V. McKenzie, Austra- lia's only woman electrical engineer and licensed electrical contractor. She has been in the business since 1914, and is better known to the trade as Miss F. V. Wallace. That's the trouble about women in business, she says. You make a name for yourself, then some handsome hero comes and swallows it up. As Miss Wallace, she ran one of Syd- ney's first radio shops. Her husband was among her early customers. Mr. McKen- zie is an electrical engineer too. They are both thoroughly happy with their screw-drivers, batteries, and bits of wire. There is nothing masculine about Mrs. McKenzie, in spite of her mannish busi- ness. She is petite and neat. She likes cooking and dancing. At her home in Greenwich Point she has one of the finest collections of gold- fish in Sydney. An expert on aquaria, she has lectured o...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
FOR FUN AND FANCY [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

FOß FUN AND FANCY What is thc difference between a carpet and a bottle of medicine? One is taken up and shaken, and the other is shaken up and taken. Why is thc letter "M" like a magician? Because it changes "ice" into "mice." Why is an empty room like a room full of married people? Because there is not a single person In it. Prize Card to Maisie Blue, li Hillview Road, Eastwood.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

For the best "Clever Idea," 10/ will be paid. A minimum of 2/6 will be paid for other ideas published.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
VISITING AUSTRALIA [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

VISITING AUSTRALIA MISS CAMPBELL, daughter of Sir John, Bt., D.S.O., and Lady Camp- bell, of Malay States, is in Sydney at present with her mother. She is an enthusiastic tennis and golf player. She also finds much enjoyment in jungle picnics, for which elephants are nsed as a means of transport.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
HARDCOURTS FINALS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

HARDCOURTS FINALS The Combined Hardcourts Champion- ships are still going strong in the North- ern Suburbs District, but should con- clude next week. Mrs. Betts and Miss Selwyn beat Mrs. Harper and Miss Hayes in two straight sets, thus annexing the Women's Doubles Championship. Miss K. Campbell unex- pectedly defeated Miss J. Williams, 6-4, 6-1, in the Junior Girls' Singles under 21 event. Miss Williams has represented the State in the C. Wilson Cup, but Miss Campbell was right at the top of her game. She drove well throughout the match. In the finals of the Girls Plate, Miss Napier beat Miss Huxley, 5-7, 6-4, 6-0. Mr. Norman Brookes, C.B.E., and Mrs. Brookes and daughters, Elaine and Hersey, left by the Mariposa on Wednes- day for Honolulu, where they will spend the winter months.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
PARTNERSHIP AUGURS SUCCESS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

PARTNERSHIP AUGURS * SUCCESS The news that Mr. and Mrs. Jack Crawford will be partners in the mixed doubles at Wimbledon is very welcome in view of their past performances to- gether. At Wimbledon they defeated Helen Jacobs and Allison, while in Adelaide and Sydney, in 1931 and 1932 respec- tively, they won the Australian mixed doubles championships.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

I Printed and Published by Sydney Newspapers Ltd.. Macdonell House. 321 Pitt Street. Sydney I

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

MEMBERS OF the N.S.W. Women's Hockey Team chosen to tour Suva. (Left to right) : Misses Moriarty Crowley, Pepper, O'Brien, Hollingworth, M. Johnson, Locke, Burrell, Whyte, N. Wicks.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
SPORTS GIRLS NEED MORE Dressing ROOMS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

SPORTS GIRLS NEED MORE Dressing ROOMS HOW will the different women's sport- ing clubs be catered for in the summer months? Playing fields are scarce enough, but when these are pro- curable, the lack of dressing accommo- dation for the players is deplorable. Hundreds of players use the Domain, winter and summer, and have been doing so for some years now, yet no specified place has been set aside for the accommodation of these players. The same applies to Moore Park, Cen- tennial, Prince Alfred, University and other municipal grounds. Certainly, the women are lucky in having the use of the women's square at the University, where they can play hockey and cricket under ideal con- ditions. There should be many more grounds of a like nature for the women players. Every branch of women's sports is expanding, and the time is now at hand for the various councils to make arrange- ments and provide dressing rooms for the summer season.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

COUNTRY women's golf at La Perouse. Miss Phillips, champion from Lithgow club, driving in the Country Golf Carnival.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Rowers Active [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

Rowers Active VICTORIAN Women's Rowing Asso- ciation held their Annual Meeting last week, when the office-bearers were re- elected. Forty members were present, representing clubs from Albert Park, Bendigo, Essendon, Preston and Warr- nambool.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

He: What did you give the mite for a present? She: Well, I opened the pet's money-box and bought him a beautiful electric iron.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LONDON. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 1 July 1933

LONDON, j Australian women uko nant to j ! adopt the high hats that are now = I the rage among smart Londoners j j and Parisiennes must make up their j j minds to spend a little time and j j trouble over their facial make-up if j j the ultimate effect is lo be becoming. J

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
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