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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A SOCIETY DIVORCE. THE INFATUATION OP THE LORD LIEUTENANT'S DAUGHTER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A SOCIETY DIVORCE.         THE INFATUATION OF THE LORD LIEUTENANT'S DAUGHTER.   A scandal which has shocked the cream of   London society for some time culminated in the   Divorce Court there on the 29th of November.   On that date Mr. Justice Barnes and a special   jury had before them the petition of the Hon.   Sybil Burnaby for a divorce by reason of the   desertion and adultery of her husband, Mr. Al-   gernon Edwyn Burnaby, of Baggrave Hall, Lei-   cestershire. The adultery was with Lady Sophie   Scott, wife of Sir Samuel Scott, and daughter   of Earl Cadogan, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.   When in 1896 Lady Sophie married the wealthy   London banker, Sir Samuel Scott, the very nicest   society raved over the event. The King and   Queen...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRUSSIAN CHILD-FLOGGERS. INTERVIEW WITH THE GREAT NOVELIST SIENKIEWICZ. GROSS CRUELTY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

PRUSSIAN CHILD-FLOGGERS. INTERVIEW WITH THE GREAT NOVELIST SIENKIEWICZ.   GROSS CRUELTY. The famous author Sienkiewicz has written an indignant letter to the papers at Cracow on the flogging of Polish children. He says that since the days of Frederick the Great the Prussian policy has consistently been one of crime, of cringing to the strong and tyrannising over the weak. M. Sienkiewicz has headed a subscription for the relief of the children left destitute by reason of the imprisonment of their parents. Tbe other day a representative of the London "Daily Mail" called on M. Sienkiewicz, the       novelist, who gave him several instances of cruelty to children which had come within his personal knowledge. A man named Piasecka, who was sentenced to two and a half years' imprisonment, has five little children dependent on him. Their grand- mother, over 80 years old, although very ill, was sent to prison in chains; the doctor advised h...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE SMOKE NUISANCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE SMOKE NUISANCE. In order to combat the smoke nuisance, the Prussian Government called together a commit- tee for the trial of all smoke-consuming appara- tus (says the "Engineer"). This committee has finished its work, and common measures are about to be taken to remove the evil. It was proposed to institute schools, where stokers could be specially trained for the handling of steam boiler plants. The Steam Boiler Revision Association consulted most of the branch asso- ciations, and the result was that most of them were against the idea of the schools; but it was proposed to send properly qualified men to in- struct the stokers employed in the various steam plants.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ARTESIAN WELLS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

ARTESIAN WELLS. An artesian well in Grenelle, France, took 10   years of continuous work before water was   struck, at a depth of 1780ft. At 1259ft. over 200ft.   of the boring rod broke, and fell into the well,   and it was 15 months before it was recovered.   A flow of 900,000 gallons per day is obtained   from it, the bore being 8in. At Passy, France,   there it another artesian well, 1913ft. in depth,   and 27½in. diameter, which discharges an un-   interrupted supply of 5,500,000 gallons per day;   it cost 200,000 dollars. An artesian well at Butte-   aux-Cailles, France, is 2900ft. in depth, and 47in.   diameter. These are all surpassed by an ar-   tesian well in Australia, which is 5000ft. in   depth.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ELECTRIC LAUNDRY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

ELECTRIC LAUNDRY. A laundry worked entirely by electricity has been opened at Kingston-on-Thames, England. The power is derived from the corporation mains through a six horse-power motor. Ventilation and driving are accomplished by means of elec- trically driven fans, and the irons are heated di- rect by electric current.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHO'S WHO? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

WHO'S WHO? YOU MAY KNOW A MAN BY HIS COLLAR.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHY HAIR GOES WHITE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

WHY HAIR GOES WHITE.       Professor E. Metchnikoff, the distinguished   Russian physiologist, described to interested   hearers at the Royal Society recently the pro-   cess of the whitening of human hair. Hitherto   the particular mechanism which transformed   a ringlet all "golden gay," according to Tenny-   son, into one of "silver grey" has been little   understood.     Observations show, however, that the atrophy   of the pigment of grey hair is due to the     intervention of a number of "phagocytes,"   or wandering cells of single nucleus and curious   protoplasmic prolongations, which make their   way to the cortical layer, swallow up the pig-   ment granules, and transfer them elsewhere;   hence the bleaching which we ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A STAGGERER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A STAGGERER.   An elderly dame of Condobolin   Is often her hubby seen hobblin';   "If I doesn't," she says,   "Why, I lose him for days;   And he don't come 'ome walkin', but wobblin'."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CONVERTED AT COOGEE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

CONVERTED AT COOGEE. A sharper who came from Coogee Met a tram for a moment, and the Conductor explained   That the man who remained Was the flattest he ever did see. A rather tight dame at Barcaldine To the station house had to be hauled in; They say at this stage She boiled over with rage, And her tears were in consequence scaldin'. JIMMY.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AMERICANISING ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

AMERICANISING ENGLAND.   COLONEL JONATHAN J. BULL. Or what John B. may come to. —"Punch."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RUSSIAN RAILWAYS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

RUSSIAN RAILWAYS.   Another new line is to unite the cities of Pol- tava and Yekaterinoslav, Russia. This road will be 106 kilometers (66 miles) long. The conces- sion is for 81 years, but after 20 years the Gov- ernment is to have the right to buy the road for a stipulated price. The necessity for this     line is fully appreciated by the Russian Railroad Building Commission.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
How the Poor Live. A PATHETIC LONDON CASE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

How the Poor Live.   A PATHETIC LONDON CASE.   Humorous and pathetic, squalid and tragic by turns (says the London "Daily Tele- graph" of November 27) the police court reports of a great capital are always scin- tillating with side-lights upon the life of the people, where more pretentious records leave us dark. We question whether a human document more exquisitely touching in its little way has ever appeared in our columns than one which we add this morning to all the intermin- able archives of the sorrows and struggles of the poor deposited in the files of every great news- paper. At North London yesterday a little girl was charged, on remand, with stealing food from a shop at Hackney. The child protested that she had taken the things for her small brothers, who had no dinner, and the circumstances, when elucidated, disclosed as a matter of fact one of those rare instances of bitter and honorable poverty which put all the generalisations of callous cynici...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DON'T WAIT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

DON'T WAIT.   —♦— If in this world you wish to win. And rise above the common chump, Take off your coat and pitch right in— Don't wait, lay hold, hang on, and hump. Don't wait until the iron's hot. But make it hot by muscle. Don't wait for wealth your father's got Take off your coat and hustle. Of the eight ladies who acted as train-bearers to Queen Alexandra when she was married, 38 years a go, all but one are still alive. Of these six only have entered the married state.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STUDENT'S LOVE AFFAIR. SOME FUNNY LETTERS £3000 DAMAGES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

STUDENT'S LOVE AFFAIR. SOME FUNNY LETTERS £3000 DAMAGES. Before Mr. Under-Sheriff Burchell and a special   jury, sitting in the London Sheriff's Court, on   November 22, a breach of promise action, in   which exceptionally heavy damages were award-   ed, was tried. The parties were Miss Ethel   Elizabeth Gardiner (plaintiff) and Mr. Walter   James Chate (defendant).   Mr. Rawlinson, K.C., counsel for the plaintiff,   said his client was the second daughter of Mr.   John Gardiner, now residing at Fulbourne, near   Cambridge. Her father was of independent   means, living on his income, after retiring from   the management of the Wilberforce estates in   Sussex.   The defendant was now a married man, resi-   dent at Llangollen, in Wales, and he, too, was a   gentleman possessed of ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"CHRIST HAS RISEN." RUSSIAN RELIGIOUS FANATICISM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

"CHRIST HAS RISEN." RUSSIAN RELIGIOUS FANATICISM. Extraordinary particulars are sent by the Odessa correspondent of the London "Daily News" of the recent remarkable religious riots in the vil- lage of Pavlovski. It appears that the disturb- ance was brought about by the members of a new and fanatical sect calling themselves "New Christians," who made a fierce attack upon the orthodox believers. On the day of the disturbance, a Sunday, some 70 members of the new sect, forming themselves into a procession, proceeded from the more popu- lous part of the township towards the Synodal Chapel, carrying strangely-worked banners, and crying as they went "The New Truth has dawned!" "Christ has arisen!" "Hurrah, hur- rah!" One of the young women, robed and crowned as the Virgin Mary, and carrying a few months' old infant in her arms, frequently raised the latter aloft, proclaiming it to be the newly-sent Re- deemer. The leader of the sectarians, a certain Therapontoff, then attempted to break ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
230 LONDONERS WED PER HOUR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

230 LONDONERS WED PER HOUR. There were 84,086 persons married in London in 1898—or 19 and a fraction every minute. Boy bridegrooms are growing in number. There were four under 21 in every hundred bride- grooms. About 16 girls under 21 per hundred get married. Despite the annual increase in the population of the great city, the proportion of marriages and birth rates is steadily on the decrease. In 1853 the marriage rate per thousand in London, including children, was 22.3; in 1887 it sank to 16.9; and in 1898 the latest return, shows 18.7. In 1898 there were 38,181 bachelors married, and 39,098 spinsters. The total of widowers re-married reached 3862, and that of widows 2945. The great majority of these marriages took place at the Established Church, and but a small percentage at Nonconformist places of worship. Considering that the population of Greater London exceeds five millions, the proportion of marriages is very small.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GRIM IRISH PICTURE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

GRIM IRISH PICTURE. No plight could be worse than that of Mrs. O'Dwyer, of Ballingrane. Four of her family are in custody, charged with the murder of the farmer, John Crotty; her house has been burned down; no friends helped to save it; and no neighbors will take her and her daughter in. Having had a narrow escape for their lives, mother and daughter now sleep in a hayrick, amid the blackened ruins of their home. The police protect them, but when they appear in the highways they are hooted and booed. While Mrs. O'Dwyer herself has sworn infor- mation at Midleton, with a view to compensa- tion for the malicious burning of her husband's house, the murdered farmer has been buried with every manifestation of sympathy and respect.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BRITISH SOLDIERS. CARDINAL VAUGHAN SPEAKS OF THEIR CONDUCT IN SOUTH AFRICA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

BRITISH SOLDIERS.   CARDINAL VAUGHAN SPEAKS —♦— OF THEIR CONDUCT IN SOUTH AFRICA. The spacious pro-Cathedral at Kensington,   London, was crowded the other morning by sol-   diers and civilians of all ranks belonging to the Roman Catholic Church in Great Britain, for the purpose of celebrating a Requiem Mass   "for the repose of the souls of Catholic officers   and men who have fallen in the South African   war." From the Tower of London Captain Lord   Settrington and a few other officers marched up   nearly 300 of the new Irish Guards, who were   preceded by their drum and fife band. Parties   of Guards from other regiments also marched up and took their places in the nave, the Life Guards, Grenadiers, and Coldstreamers sup-   plying the largest contingents. A number of   high military officers from head-quarters, in- &n...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TIKE TO STOP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

TIME TO STOP. Among the best stories recorded by a well- known angler is one about a Scottish laird who was one day relating to his friends at the dinner table the story of a fine fish he had caught. "Donald," said he to the servant behind his chair, an old man but a new servant, "how heavy was the fish I took yesterday?"   Donald neither spoke nor moved. The laird repeated the question. "Weel," replied Donald, "it was twal' pund at breakfast, it had gotten to achteen at dinner time, and it was sax-and-twenty when ye sat down to supper wi' the captain." Then, after a pause, he added, "I've been tellin' lees a' my life to please the shooters, but I'll be blowed if I'm going to tell lees noo, in my old age, to please the fushers!" Vincenzo G. Pecci is revered by millions of people of all nationalities, but few know him by that name. Yet that is the real name of Pope Leo XIII., and the one by which he was known until he became Pope in 1878.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WORTH KNOWING. TO CLEAN STEEL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

WORTH KNOWING.   TO CLEAN STEEL. Mix sufficient soot with olive oil till it is of the consistency of very thick cream. Take a soft   brush, and dipping it into the mixture, brush well over the steel, so that every part receives an application, and then polish quickly with a woollen rag.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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