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Elephind.com contains 7,005 items from Richmond Guardian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Postmen at the Front. WORK UNDER DIFFICULTIES. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

Postmen at the Front. WORK UNDER DIFFICULTIES. The Australian postal corps on ac i tive service is by no means out of the zone of shell activities. The final sorting of letters is done under shell fire, and the corps works under the most trying conditions. Their hours are long and they are frequently com pelled to do their bit in houses in a more or less battered condition and which offer little protection against the rain, snow and hail. One idea of the work which they cope with may be gathered from the fact that two mails at Christmas time consisted of 20,000 bags of parcels alone, and this irrespective of letters-and these were sorted and despatched by January 2. At the base post-office the daily re turn and despatch of letters for re direction averages about 30,000. It is not only the Australian mail which they handle, but parcels from Eng land, and these, which run into many thousands, go through their hands be fore being despatched.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A New Comet. STAR WITH TAIL IN JULY. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

A New Comet. STAR WITH TAIL IN JULY. There is a comet, the largest ever seen, due in July. Of course it has the usual tail, and equally, of course, we may expect the usual tales of what will happen as the result of its ap pearance. That it is the sign of a big war will for once be abandoned, but torrential rains, fearful heat and cyclones are certain to be predicted by believers in signs and superstitious folk. Others will say it is the out come of an aerial and political dis turbance and portends immense and radical changes in Australian govern ment. The conventional fear that if its tail touches this earth we shall be singed into nothingness is sure to be experienced. During the next four months all sorts of reasons for Wolf's comet (its trade name) will be crop ping up, and warnings not to look at it through a window-pane are sure to be prevalent. It will take some finding with the naked eye, as its nearest ap proach to our earth- will -be about 164,000,000 -miles. . -

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Bill Sikes—Patriot CROOKS IN THE FIRING-LINE. FAKE HEROES WHO NEVER SAW IT. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

Bill Sikes-Patriot CROOKS IN THE FIRING-LINE. FAKE HEROES. WHO NEVER SAW IT. " One of the most amazing effects of tlhe war-if we are to place any re liance on police-court records and statistics-is the wonderful restraint which has somehow or other been placed upon the criminal classes (says the "Daily Mail"). In any of the courts throughout the country nowadays far fewer charges are be ing dealt with than in peace times. Burglary, forgery, coining, receiving, all have lessened. A typical illustration of the fact was afforded the other day in one of the main thoroughfares of the metro polis. A gentleman was walking along the street with a detective when the latter suddenly halted, crossed the road, and laid his hand on the shoulder of a man wearing khaki. 'Well, Bill?" he asked genially.: "Bill" winced. "You-you've made a mistake!".he gulped. "I don't. know. you! My name's Cooper. I was at Mons, at Le Cateau, and Neuve Chapelle!" For a second the detective hesita ted; then he shrugg...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CARVING THE CHRISTMAS TURKEY. RICHMOND BOYS TELL CHEERFUL STORIES. HAPPY TIMES IN HOSPITALS AND TRENCHES. A HOLIDAY IN LONDON. SOLDIER NEWS FROM THE WIDE, WIDE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

CARVING THE CHRISTMAS TURKEY. RICHMOND BOYS TELL CHEERFUL STORIES. HAPPY TIMES IN HOSPITALS AND TRENCHES. A HOLIDAY IN LONDON. SOLDIER NEWS FROM THE WIDE, WIDE WORLD. Richmond casualties this week in elude:- Killed in Action. ] privates K. McAskill and C. V. Baines. Dangerously Wounded. Lance-Corp. F. M. Kane. Wounded. Corp. A. M. Pittard, Privates P. Davies, A. E. Muggeridge, W. R. Gray, T. H. Pollard. Enlistments from Richmond since 1 our last list include:-O. E. Goble, H. i W. Good, F. O'Brien, H. O. McAllan, J. Armstrong, T. J. Baker, J. Dun stan, G. A. Styles. This is the letter, written in big t rcund writing on pencil-ruled paper, c which Private Edward Brownring re- t ceived in a parcel of comforts:-"For ' a sick soldier in Egypt. I hope you r will be better and that the pain ' isn't, that you will fight again in the s i:?rdanelles. I have an uncle at the war. John Braund, Armidale." Brown- 1 ring has been invalihed home and dis charged, and he has a rare treat in ii store f...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Deep-Sea Divers THEIR WORK FOR THE NAVY. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

Deep-Sea Divers THEIR WORK FOR THE NAVY. By John F. Rendall in the "Windsor Magazine." It would be hard to name a more valuable servant of King and country than the fully-trained diver, who goes below clad in cumbrous -armour as readily as you and I descend to din ner at the sound' of the gong. Since the War began, little or nothing has appeared about this strange and ro mantic knight of the deep and his two esquires in the boat above, one of them working the air-pump, the other keenly alert for signals out of the wat ery abyss. What is this man doing down in the sea's heart, followed by inquisitive fishes that flock to his electric lights, and dart off in a flash when he lets bubbles of air out of his unwieldy dress? He may have one of a hun dred duties. There is much to do on the ocean floor in these days of sub marine dangers-of mines and coun ter-mines, of floating wreckage which may foul the propellers, of damage to be inspected below the water-line, of derelicts to be blown up...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Richmond Rifle Club. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

Richmond Rifle Club. Shooting for the spoon, champion, and P.L.B. trophies (ten shots at 600 yards), W. T Smith was the winner. Scores:-W. T. Smith (2) 50, R. Fras er (6) 50, R. Lowe (5) 50, H. Irwin (5) 50, L. Allison (6) 50. The third competition of the twelth series of handicap teams matches was fired on Saturday, and the Richmond team finished fifth. If she calls the dress she puts on before breakfast a breakfast gown, you may know she is.a bride. After she has been married a year it he comes an old wrapper.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Working for the Turks. AUSTRALIAN PRISONERS OF WAR. WELL TREATED AND RECEIVING WAGES. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

Working for the Turks. AUSTRALIAN PRISONERS OF WAR. WELL TREATED AND RECEIVING WAGES. Australians -now prisoners in Tur 'key and Asia Minor sdem to be ex periencing a slightly better time than their brothers-in-arms in German pri son camps, where hygiene is a thing unknown and sanitary conditions are beyond description. Food of a kind is at least obtainable in Turkey, and many of the men are working on the Bagdad railway earning 1/4. a day, on which they are able to exist and to a certain extent maintain a healthy condition. Since October last the Australian Red Cross Commissioners have sent a parcel of food, value 7/6, and tobacco and cigarettes every fort night to each man, and it is estimated that there are 108 Australian prison ers in Turkey and Asia Minor in the various camps. Each man has also been supplied with some warm under clothing, a pair of boots and toilet necessaries. Of course, it is impOs sible to receive acknowledgments from the prisoners in Turkey before many mont...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Richmond Council Finances. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

Richmond Council Finances. From 1st October, 1916, to 3rd March, 1917, the total receipts were. £4380 7/3, as compared with £3613 18/6 from 1st October, 1915, to 3rd March, 1916. On 3rd March, 1916, there was a debit balance of £14,435 5/3. On 3rd March, 1917, there was a debit balance of £14,776 2/9. Fur ther payments amounting to £1938 were passed.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Boom in Photography. ALL SOLDIERS HAVE PICTURES TAKEN. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

Boom in Photography. ALL SOLDIERS HAVE PICTURES TAKEN. Perhaps no business has benefited more by the war than that of the photographer. Right from the jump the photographic studios have been working at high pressure, both at home and abroad. It is a fair esti mate to say that of every hundred men who have left Australia fully fifty paid a visit to one or other stu dio and ordered anything from one to six dozen of their likenesses. Par ents, relatives 'and sweethearts all clamored for something to keep in front of them as a remembrance-and got it. And it d!dn't stop with the de parture. When the boy went to Lon don on leave he invariably had a photo taken and sent to Australia to show how he looked. Recent mails have brought immense numbers of photos, including many novelties. One of the. best makes the man in the photo move his eyes -and smile most naturally by just bending a movable slip at the end of the card backwards and forwards;. Willis: Going to the party? Gillis: No. I haven...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BUBBLES AT THE BATHS RECORD SWIMMING CARNIVAL CROWDED WITH INTEREST. INSTRUCTIVE DISPLAYS AND EXCITING EVENTS. PROGRESS OF CITY IN SWIMMING PRAISED BY OUTSIDE EXPERTS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

BUBBLES AT THE BATHS RECORD SWIMMING CARNIVAL CROWDED WITH INTEREST. INSTRUCTIVE DISPLAYS AND EXCITING EVENTS. PROGRESS OF CITY IN SWIM MING PRAISED BY OUTSIDE EXPERTS. "Bubbles" Conduit stood on the top of the 30ft. dive at the Richmond 3aths -on Saturday. He is eleven years of age, and his tiny figure look ed little more than that of a baby. For a second he poised there, and then he dived. Like a sea-bird after fish "he little form sailed through the air ind disappeared in the water. Then he came to the surface and struck out manfully for the steps with the I pplause of over 1500 spectators inging in his ears. "Bubbles" is 'mall even for his years, and his ,luck and skill provided the feature -f the afternoon. He is a Central schoolboy, and is a sample product of the progressive swimming policy adopted in Richmond. It was this activity that led to the gala day at the Gleadell-street baths on Saturday. The Royal Life Saving Society have hitherto held their an nual displays at the C...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Help the Children.—New Hall for Cremorne Street. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

Help the Children.-New Hall for Cremorne Street. Richmond people are asked to in terest themselves in a concert to be given on March 22 in the Richmond Town Hall, in aid of the new hall for the Cremorne-street Free Kindergar ten. The present building is inade quate to meet the: needs of the chil dren. Rarely a week passes but a number have to be refused admis sion. Miss Home and friends are giving their services free. The new hall is to be erected in memory of Mrs. M. E. Kirk, who has given much bf her life to the work among women and children.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Application to Carry On Treatment of Skins Industry Approved by Council—Making of Basils Here Instead of Overseas Will Give Employment to Hundreds. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

Application to Carry On Treatment of SkI;- Inrlustrv Anoroved by Council --Making of Basils Here Instead of Over'esq Will Give Employment to H undreds. Not for a long time has there been raised such a local interest controver sial subject as has been engendered by the continued efforts of the morn ing newspapers and interested parties opposed to the establishment ,of new works adjacent to the Yarra at Haw thorn. As expec'ed, the council, who had gone very fully into the applica tion by J. Kennon and Sons Pty. Ltd. for permission to establish a fellmon 'ery at River-street. on Monday night granted the request. Cr. O'Connell was in charre of the motion giving permission, and he briefly outlined the proposals and repeated the assur -nces of the applicants that there would be nothing offensive to silht or -mell. Other councillors, including Crs. Strahan and Joyce, who profess a knowledge of the subject, stated that the methods emnloyed in the treat ment of skins to-day were very differ ...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Christmas Carol and Murphy of Anzac Provide Striking Contrast in Crown Bill—Charlie Chaplin and Alice Brady Amongst Many Stars Next Week. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

Christmas Carol and Murphy of Anzac Provlde Striking Contrast In Crown Bill-Charlie Chaplin and Alice Brady Amongst Many Stars Next Week Marking St. Patrick's Day, there will be special illustrated Irish songs at the Globe this evening. Her Debt of Honor and The Reward will be the feature films. Dickens' classic, A Christmas Carol, will be seen on the screen on Monday. It has been renamed The Right to Be Happy, and visualises in a remarkable manner the charming story. Scrooge, the Crachitts and all the others in the wonderful gallery of characters are depicted by clever actors, and the ghost effects are attained in a manner impossible anywhere but on the screen. The atmosphere has been re tained in an artistic way. Provid ing a marked contrast to the simule sweet story will be Murphy of Anzac, depictine daneer, battle and death. It is a local production concerning the doings of the heroic Red Cross man at Gallipoli- who, with his patient don-. key, was the means of saving many lives...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Love Story of Dicky Collins, V.C. WAR EXACTED A HEAVY TRIBUTE FROM HIM, BUT HE WAS EVERYTHING THAT WAS WORTH WHILE. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

The Love Story of - Dicky Collins, V.C. WAR EXACTED A HEAVY TRI BUTE FROM HIM, BUT HE WAS EVERYTHING THAT WAS WORTH WHILE. By an Anzac Officer. I'm telling you this as Dicky told it to me when we lay out on the wide lawn at Brook Farm one glorious Aus tralian summer evening when the stars were set in a sapphire sky and all around us the bush sang its haunt ing far-off lullaby. "No; I don't hold with chloroform ing the worst cases," he said. "Look at me. When I came out of the land ing at Gallipoli I was as helpless a man as you'd ever want to see. For months they kept me in hospitals Malta, Alexandria and even Harifield; but it wasn't any good. I just got thinner and thinner, and however they turned and twisted my legs, they couldn't make me walk. At last they threw up the sponge and I came home. "God, that was torture. Those long nights on the Indian Ocean, each one bringing me nearer home, will be with me till I die. I don't think I could ever bear to see that strip of water again...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A BUSINESS STORY. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

A BUSINESS STORY. Horatio J. Jones began as an office boy. His salary was four dollars per week. His first task was to sit at a knife scarred old desk. and address en velopes, envelopes, envelopes all day long til his fingers were stiff and his arm ached But Horatio Jones was no quitter. He stuck. And after a while he was promoted to better things, including a rise of two dollars. (Thirty years are supposed to elapse.) Peep into that private office-no body will hear you, the carpet is three inches thick-and see if you know the man at the large flat-topped desk in the centre of the room. You don't? Well, it is Horatio J. Jones, the newly-elected president of the Goldlined Loan and Trust Company. The story of his rise in the business world is one of brilliant progress. From an office boy at four dollars a week, he has gone up, up until now as a successful banker he commands a salary of 40,000 dollars a years. His desk and surroundings are very different from those of his office-boy ho...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Shells and Snipers OFFICER'S EARLY IMPRESSIONS. VIVID TRENCH STORY. A GENERAL AMONG THE RATS. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

Shells and Snipers OFFICER'S EARLY IMPRESSJONS. VIVID. TRENCH "STORY. - A GENERAL.:AMONG THE RATS. SA brigadier-general, -writing to his wife in: Sydney-, .from ,the .front: in France, describes :his .early_ experien ces-. an.d.. observations :in the cam paign:. .-.- - " .. . .. hI: the- afternoon orders .camei that we were to:go-into the line as soon as possible, and the next morning our battalion- was. sent- up to. relieve one ofbthe: geserve .battalions in the line. On--the following day two men were sent:up t 'gop into the front line, and we began our first acquaintafice with the Huns.- It was a *bright 'Suiday morning when I first saw our lines. It was quiet and peaceful, except 'for a few shells which were falling down on our right.. Opposite. us there was no sign-that the Hun was at all .in terested in our -movements. _The first few n days were also quiet. But the Boche gradually , woke. up, -and .our men began to experiencee shell-fire. It' subdued them' a bit at-first, but ...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GRAND-PERE. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

GRAND-PERE. And so when he reached my bed The General made a stand: "My brave young fellow," he said, "I would shake your hand." So I lifted my arm, the right, With never a hand at all; Only a stump, a sight Fit to appal. "Well, well. Now that's too bad! That's sorrowful luck," he said; "But there! You give me, my lad, The left instead." So from under the blanket's rim I raised and showed him the other,. A snag as ugly and grim As its ugly brother. He looked at each jagged wrist; He looked, but he did not speak;' And then he bent down and kissed Me on either cheek. You wonder now I don't mind I hadn't a hand to offer. . They tell me (you know, I'm blind) 'Twas Grand-pa Joffre. -"Rhymes of a Red Cross Man," by Robert W. Service. "Sir," said the young nwan with' en thusiasm, as he seized the lecturer's hand and shook it warmly, "I certain ly enjoyed your lecture last night very much indeed." "I am glad to hear that," said the lecturer, "but I didn't see you there." "No," admitted the ...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OUR SOLEMN GAMES. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

OUR SOLEMN GAMES. "The most solemn things in Enig land are not (as you might be inclined to think) such things as funerals and commemoration services, but games. Have you ever seen a professional bil. liard.match? The players wear even. ing clothes. But 'they wear the coad only that they may take it off before they begin to play. And then they play, in a pool of white radiance, whilst all around them, in a dim re. ligious light, sit rows on rows of silent devotees as at some holy shrine, ob. serving some esoteric ritual. Not a word is spoken. There is never a smile. From time to time the marker calls the scores as if he were chant. ing responses. The balls kiss-kiss with a hushed sibilance. It seems all so. dignified and awe-inspiring that you begin to wonder what it is you miss, what it is you are waiting for. And then you realise it is either the grand strains of a church organ or the sidesman with the offertory bag. Once Inman, in a match with Steven. son, miscued, and Stevenson ...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE ORDERLY'S ODE. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

THE ORDERLY'S ODE. It's orderly here, and orderly there, And where is that. orderly-well, I declare! It's orderly this, and orderly that, And orderly, will you please shake the mat? The floor of the kitchen has got to be scrubbed (I'm sorry your uniform's new), There's a bucket of rubbish I want to have tubbed, And a few other things you can do. Orderly, please light the reading .room fire, And I want a few pair's of boots brush ed; Orderly, please get the temperature higher, And the day room's in want- of a dust. We don't mind the work, it's all in our lives, -- - But please, kindly nurses-Oh! don't tell our wives How we scrubbed, and we dusted, our stiffness concealing, Or they'll want us to do it at every spring cleaning! -"Maple Leaf" in "The Command Gazette." Katherine and Margaret found themselves seated next to each other at a dinner party, and immediately be came confidential. "Molly told me that you told her that secret I told you not to tell her," whispered Margaret. "Oh,,...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
From Various Sources [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 17 March 1917

From Various Sources ,\'e fear the eggs in the nest of the dia p of peace are mostly door knobs. .rs Angeles "Times." \\'hen Mr. Higgs was baiting Mr. (orer, the tall white-whiskered 0%,..iusiander who took Mr. Andrew :i:.ir's place, another Queenslander i; -, . Finlr-s:on, the temperance re :ii;r who represents Brisbane, caus . i :. r:iat laugh by warning Mr. Higgs ,, i,, i:areiful \,,,at you say to him, 11 :.r ie 'l pay you out when he .,,,, iowin your chimney next Christ . :Even the whiskered one join ei : Ih laugh.-"Table Talk." \ .:.iul recruit went into camp the c, : .lay boasting that he had ,:,.::i a Government department. ,,I, ;~ ~;o imperative orders in his ,, . One was from the Rabbit In i.w,;,:r of his district ordering him ,. i:in. of severe penalties to kill all !; .-:it:; on his farm within four •icr;! ,:.s. The other order was from i hi-h miilitary authority commanding him to report himself in camp at once He -be'ys the order to get ready to ill (;.r:!ians at the fro...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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