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Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

PHYSICIANS. DR. IX VV. BUAD&S, Physician and Surgeon. Office in the Old Bank Building, Main street. Sept. It, id«l—lv.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

MERCHANTS WM. A. PORTER, i Wholesale and Retail Dealei in Foreign and Domes- { tic Dry Goods, Groceries, Notions, etc.. Main street. Sept. II. 1801—ly. GEO. HOSKINSOV, Opposite the Court House, keeps always on hand a large stock of Seasonable Dry Goods, Groceries, Hoots ana Sboea, and Notions generally. Sept. 11, 1881—ly. ANDREW WILSON, Dealer in Dry Goods, Groceries, Drugs. Noiions, Hardware, Queenswarc, Stoneware, Looking Glasses, Iron and Nails, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Main street, one door east of the Old Bank. Sept. II, 1861—ly A. WILSON, Jr., Dealer in Dry Goods. Queeusware. Notions, Hats, , Caps, Bonnets, fcc, Wilson's New Building, Main i ¦ treat. Sept. II. lMfil—ly. | R. CLARK, Dealer in Bry Goods, Groceries, Hardware, Queensware and notions, one door west of the Adams House, M-iin street. Sept. II, 1861—ly. MINOR & CO., Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Dry Goods, Groceries, Queensware, Hardware and Notions, opposite j tnc Green House. Main street. Sept. 11...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

^ DRUGS DR. W. L. CREIGH, Physician and Surgeon, And dealer in Drugs, Medicines. Oils, Paii.ia, fcc. A.C.. Main street, a few doors east of the Bank. Sept 11.1861—ly. M. A. liARVBY, Druggist and Apothecary, and dealer in Paints and Oils, the most celebrated Patent Medicines, and Pure Liquors for medicinal purposes. Sept. 11,1861—ly

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

oisOTmvo. N. CLARK, Dealer in Men- and Boy's Clothing. Cloths, Cassimervs. Satinets, Hats and Caps, &c. Main street, op. polite the Court House. Sept. 11. 1861—ly. A. J. SOWERS, Dealer in Men ami Box's Clothing, Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps. Old Bank Building, Main street. Sept. II, 1861—4m

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

BOOTAXTO SHOB DSAI.BRS. ' j.DTCOSGRAY, " Boot and Shoe maker. Main street, nearly opposite1 the "Farmer's and Drover's Dank." Every style of Boots and Shoes constantly on hand or made to order. Sept. II. 1861—ly. J. B. RICKEY, ROM and Shoe maker, Sayer* * Corner. Main street. Boon and Btioee of every variety always on hand or made to order on short notice Sept. II, 1861—ly.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

OROOBRIBS| ftVARIETIES JOSEPH YATER, Dealer in Groceries *nd Confectioneries, Notions, Medicines, Perfumeries, Liverpool Ware. « LC . Glass of all sins, and Gilt Mnullin ' and Looking Glass Plates. fn-Caih paid f >r good eating Apples. Sept. 11, lool-ty. JOHN MUNNELL, ~ Dealer In Groceries and Confectionariea and Variety Goods Generally. Wilson's Ntw Building. Main street. ¦ •P 11, Utt—ly.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

________JBOOK8. Ac. _^_ LEWIS DAY, «?"TXi M?S!5£ *,, 'll ! ",£*H*,,«o"M Bonta - ¦ - .tfoii-£J'J!...'.VI!^M Md '•Pom. Wilson's Old Buildf__________ Sept. II. 1861—ly

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

^ ^ ^ ^ Bm ^ FAMERS'& DROVEKS'BANK " " J Wt^f»—'bmrm. P». ' JBWI HOOK, rres'C. * J. LAZEAR, Cashier DISCOVHT MY. WsVBlf E8DAY. MUM***. ..

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

flAPPXaS AND HARKBB8 Vk/#AMtJEL M»ALbfSTER, T^liSB^^^'^0''

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

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Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
An Hour at the Old Play Ground. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

An Hour at the Old Play Ground. BT BARY MONFORD. I aa'. an hour to-day, John, Beside ibe old brook stream, Where we were school boys in olden time, When manhood was a dream. The brook is choked with fallen leaves, The pond is dried away—I scarce believe that you would know The dear old place to-day. The school-house is no more, John, Beneath our locust trees ; The wild rose by the window side, No more waves in the breeze ; The scattered s ones look desolate, The sod they rested on Has been ploughed up by stranger hands, Since you and 1 were gone. The chestnut tree is dead, John, And what is sadder now—The broken grape-vine of our swing Hangs on the withered bough ; I read our names upon the bark, And founa the pebbles rare Laid up beneath the hollow side, As we had piled them there. Beneath the grass grown bank, John, 1 looked tor our old spring, That bubbled down theuiiltr path, Three paces from the swing ; The rushes grow upon the brink . The pool is black and bare, And no...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Model Lieutenant. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

A Model Lieutenant. The Buttalo Advocate contains an interesting account of a model Lieutenant, now in camp at Arlington Heights, from which we make the following: He has already held numerous prayer meetings with his men, and in this way, as well as by his private and friendly counsels, has rendered most important service to the moral and spiritual welfare of the regiment. Prom a private letter we learn that, not long since, he was out in charge of two hundred and fifty men who were engaged in felling trees preparatory to some military defense for the troops. The men, understanding the usage of the officers to allow spirit rations to all who engaged in such fatigue duty, called and demanded their liquor. It required a firm nerve to refuse them; but it was done, and with an emphasis and a heart which showed them that he was in earnest, and desired only their good. "I'll be broke of my commission," said he, "sooner than I'll make my men drunk!" Our voung Lieutenant is bravo a...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Latest from Artemus Ward. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

The Latest from Artemus Ward. Artemns Ward commences his contribution to this week's Vanity Fair with the following cheering paragraph : Notwithstanding I haintwrit much for the papers of late, nobody needn't flatter themselves that the undersigned is ded. On the contrary, "I still live," which words was spoken by Daniel Webster, who was a able man. Even the old line Whigs of Boston will admit that Webster is ded now, howsomever, and his mantle has probly fallen into the hands of sum dealer in 2nd hand close, who can't sell it. Leastways nobody pears to be goin round wearin it to any particler extent, now days. The regiment of whom I was kurnal finerly concluded they was better adapted as Home Guards, which accounts for your not hearin of me, ear this, where the hauls is the thickest and where the cannon doth roar. But as a American citizen I shall never cease to admire the masterly advance our troops made on Washington from Bull Kim. It was well dun. I spoke to my wife 'bout ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
§tui Ifocellaitg. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

§t\ui Ifocellaitg. ,A Gloomy Future for England. A short cotton supply in England is contemplated with gloomy forebodings. The London Chronicle, of the 9th ult., says : "The beautiful harvest, has saved thousands from utter want, and it would be I impossible to over estimate the advantages it will be the means of conferring on the poorer classes during the remainder of this and the greater part of next year.— But for this we might well shrink from contemplating the future. For, let our home demand be what it may, it cannot bring trad? to the flourishing position it occupied prior to the outbreak of hostilities in America. The many thousands who depend upon iron and cotton manufactures for their daily bread most inevitably undergo many hardships next winter, and unless we can by means obtain sup- I plies of cotton, still greater calamities will [ surely overtake us. We do not perceive ; any means by which this end can be gained,—unlq§s, indeed, the Confederates change their d...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Napoleon's Ooat of Mail. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

Napoleon's Ooat of Mail. Just before Napoleon set out for Belgium (before the battle of Waterloo,) he sent for the cleverest artisan of his class* in Paris, and demanded of him whether he would engage to make a coat of* mail to be worn under the ordinary dress, which should be absolutely bullet-proof; and that, if so. he might name his own price for such a work. The man engaged to make the desired object, if allowed proper time, and he named 18,000 francs (72U?.) as the price of it. The bargain was concluded, and in due time the work was produced, and the artisan was honored with a second audience of the Emperor.— i; Now," said his imperial Majesty, "put it on." The man did so, "As I am to stake my life on its efficacy, you will, I suppose, have no objection tt* do the same ?" and ho took a brace of pistols, and prepared to discharge one at the breast of the astonished artist. There was no retreating, however, and, half dead with fear, he stood the fire; and, to the infinite...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Have you a Grandmother ? [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

Have you a Grandmother ? ' Have you a grandmother,dear littleone? Is the warmest corner and the softest chair in your sitting room filled by one whose locks are blanched, and whose brow is furrowed by years? If so, then you are a blessed child, and ought to be very thankful to the God who has spared this dear loving heart to guide you, by sweet lessons and gentle example, in the paths of peace. Do you not pity little' ones who have no grandmother? Who do you think—when their mother is busy or away—strokes the weary little head, ties up the bleeding finger, warms within her own the half-frozen hands? Who interests herself in all their tiny affairs, from the flight of a kite to the strapping of a skate? Oh, nobodv but "grandmother" can stoop from age and wisdom to be again a child for your dear sakes. A few months ago, the children in my house had two grandmothers, both as gentle, loving, and good as any who bore the name. One still lives, honored and beloved by the fold of gr...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Ko "Pent-up Utica." [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

Ko "Pent-up Utica." Every body has heard the lines, "Xo pent-up Utica contracts our powers, But the whole boundless continent is ours." But very few people know the author, or in what poem they occur.— The Portsmouth (N. H.) Journal says they were written by one Jonathan Mitchell Sewell, a Portsmouth poet, as an epilogue to Addison's play of Cato, on the occasion of its performance by an amateur company in that city in 1788. The whole production was one of decided power. The spirit of the Revolution entered into every expression. We give a few lines: "And what now gleams with dawuing rays at home Once blazed in full-orbed majesty at Rome. Did Rome's brave Senate nobly strive t'oppose The mighty torrent of domestic foes, And boldly arm the virtuous few, and dare The desperate perils of unequal war? Our Senate, too, the same bold deed has done, And for a Cato armed a Washington ! "Rise, then, my countrymen, for fight prepare, Gird on your swords, and fearless rush to war! For ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Baltimore Lady Taken Down. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

A Baltimore Lady Taken Down. A letter from Baltimore says:—"An officer who came up from Annapolis was walking in the street, when he met a lady whogathered up her skirts close to her and said, 'Don't touch ni_, you vile wretch,' and passed on. The gentleman made no reply, but, turning round, followed her to a handsome house on a fashionable street, and, as soon as she entered he ascended the steps and rang the bell. A servant answered the gammons, and the officer asked the name of the gentleman residing there j and said he wished to see him.— When he-appeared the officer said to him : 'Sir, a woman has just entered this house who grossly insulted me on the street a few j moments since, and I wish to know if you j are responsible for her behavior?' The gentleman turned to the lady, who was standing behind him, and said, 'Anne, come here and apologize to this gentleman. 1 will not be drawn into scrapes by your insolence. 1 have told you all along that you would get yourself into...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
——««_. «- Winter Quarters of the Eebel Army. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

——««_. «- Winter Quarters of the Eebel Army. A correspondent of the Richmond Dispatch, who is connected with the Hampton Legion, on the Potomac, writes as follows to that paper, under date of October 7th: "The most dispiriting news which has ever reached our camp is that wc may probably go into winter quarters on this side of tho Potomac—than which nothing could be more disappointing and dissatisfactory to the Southern soldiers, with the unmurmuring patience which they have endured the diseases that have deciminated their numbers, and all the privations and wants of a first campaign; and now that a benign Providence has rebuked the 4' sease i and health and vigor again returned to our ranks, they cannot appreciate the policy which would keep 2o0,000 Southern men—a number sufficient to do almost anything—enclosed in ice and snow five or six months to defend Virginia alone. We have always had the utmost confidence in our Generals, but if an inactivity bore shall encourage the ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
late Estates Sequestered by the Rebels. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 30 October 1861

late Estates Sequestered by the Rebels. hince the autn oi beptemoer , Richmond papers state, estates and property valued at $800,000 have been confiscated. Among those who have thus suffered are the following: —Auguste Belmont, five hundred hogsheads of tobacco, valued at $280,000; firm of Woods, Lowry & Farant, of Norfolk. C. M. Fry & Co., of New York; Chickering k Sons, piano manufacture»% ,^^oug h their Richmond agent; an ^rote of eight hundred acres, fully stocked with negroes, live stock, &c, owned by Win. C. Rives, jr., of Boston; an estate of eight hundi-ed acres, with a full stock of negroes, &c, belonging to Francis Rives, of New York City; and an es tate of eight hundred acres, stocked with negroes. &c, the property of Mrs. Sigourney, of New York City. Agents nave been appointed to take care of these estates. A petition has been filed for the sequestration of "Monticello." the former home of Jefferson, now owned by Uriah P. L...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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