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Title: Illinois Farmer Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,057 items from Illinois Farmer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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What a Man Can do in the West [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

What a Man Can do in the West A correspondent of the New York Tribune who gives the facts in his own experience , shows what a man who has the will to do , can accomplish in Illinois . Six years ago , the man came to this State from Haverhill , Mass ., bought him a quarter section of land for $ 5 an acre , and had only money enough to make one payment . He went to work himself , and hired a boy to help him for $ 10 a month . The following paragraph explains the rest : At the end of the third year I had the whole farm paid for , with a house worth $ 1 , 000 and three miles of fence on it . The same year I had a crop of white winter wheat which yielded 27 bushels to the acre and sold for $ 1 25 per bushel , making a cash income of $ 33 per acre . Twenty bushels of wheat and forty bushels of corn per acre is a fair average crop , although corn , if cultivated as at the East , would yield from 75 to 100 bushels per acre . A man and boy , with four horses , can plow ajjd cultivate 100 ac...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Less Land or More Labor . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

Less Land or More Labor . From the Sural New Yorker . Is it true that we want less land or more labor ? asks Prof . J . A . NASH , of the New Eng . land Farmer . In a review of our former article on this subject , the Professor enters into a fur ,, ther discussion of the question , but his remarks occupy too much space for our columns . We will try to give a brief idea of the argument . It is the nature of land to be prodactive , whether cultivated or uncultivated , bnt the value of its products depends on their uses to man . An acre of wood is very valuable near a large city ; it is worth nothing on the Rooky Mountains . It is the province ot man to make land produce the greatest value , in demand , above the cost of production , or the greatest profit . To do this there must be the requisite proportion between capital and labor . A hundred acres of high priced land , with one man s work put upon it , is , in great part at least , so much dead capital . Its products will pay the in...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
THE DAIRY . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

THE DAIRY . The Cheddar Cheese . The particular manufacture of cheese , which has Acquired a considerable notoriety for superior excellence , is made in the following manner : As soon as the morning milking is over , the milk is mixed with that of the previous evening , and the whole is warmed to 80 ° by . heating a small portion of the night s milk . As soon as it is of the exact temperature , Which is ascertained by the thermometer and not by guess , pure , well-flavored rennet is added in the usual manner , and the whole allowed to stand one hour for coagulation . Next gently break the curd and take off a small quantity of whey , to be heated in a tin vessel placed in water . Break the curd carefully and minutely , and add as much of the heated whey as will raise the temperature to 80 ° , leaving it another hour , when a few pailfuls of the whey are heated so as to raise the whole mass to 100 ° . Previous to pouring on this latter , the curd is broken as carefully as before , and...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Sew York Preminm Butter . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

Sew York Preminm Butter . At the last New York State Fair , H . N . Kimball , of Rutlan , Jefferson county , obtained the first premium for 50 pounds of butter , made that season . The following are bis answers to the questions proposed to him by the Committee of Examination : 1 st . Butter was made in September , from fifteen cows . 2 d . Milk is placed in a well ventilated room , with as much surface exposed to the 4 * north as possible , the rest shaded to as to keep cool ; is warmed in fall and winter by means of a stove . The cream is taken off as soon as the milk becomes thick , and sometimes before ; it should be taken off before any specks show themselves on the cream . The cream is kept at about 56 ° or 58 ° ., by means of coolers suspended in the well . Milk should be closely watched , and not let the cream stand too long , as it injures the quality of the butter . 8 d . The butter is rinsed with cold water . 4 th . Water is used as being the best and most expeditious way ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
HORTICULTURAL [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

HORTICULTURAL The Strawberry Culture . Cincinnati is confessedly ahead of all other cities and localities in the United States in the cultivation of the strawberry . Nicholas Longworth may be regarded as having led the way to the extraordinary amount of production , not only there , but in every other part of the United States . This has been the result of a discovery made by Mr . Longworth , which has been often told , and is merely thus : An ignorant market woman , first in Philadelphia , and afterwards in Cincinnati , was famous for raising large crops , beating all her neighbors . Every spring she was observed to carefully go over her beds , pull up numbers of the largest blossoming plants and throw them over the fence . The rival gardeners , emulous of her success , carefully picked up these rejected plants and set them out in their gardens . But not yet had they caught the goose that laid the golden eggs . Her castaways did no better than the old ones , if as well , and still ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
THE GARDENER [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

THE GARDENER THE SRIPED Bua . —M . B . Bateman , in the Ohio Cultivator says that he effectually protected his cucumbers and melon vines by placing four or five bricks round the hills on edges so as to inclose them . Who will remember this ? Thinning Ont Vegetables . It seems a pity to put a hoe into those luxur iant rows of beets , carrots , parsneps , and onions , that already give promise of an abiindant * harvest . But full two-thirds of them must still be sacrificed , before you can get a full crop . They are cramped for room . The carrot sends out its roots on all sides of the main tap , and if it have a chance , will completely occupy the soil on all sides of it with its fine rootlets . One root will appropriate the aliment in a square foot of soil , much better than a half dozen , and will make a greater weight of nutritious food at the harvest . This is what wise cultivators are seeking for , — the most food upon the least surface . Thin out then to six or eight inches apar...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
THE POULTRY YARD [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

THE POULTRY YARD Gapes in Chickens . For a couple of years after commencing the raising of poultry , I was subjected to the loss of a large number of young chickens , and almost the whole of them by gapes . I inquired of an old lady , who has had great success in the chicken line , if she could tell what made the gapes . The reply was , lousy hens , and the cure , or I should say preventive , simply to grease the hen under the wings thoroughly , and around the neck as soon as sha came off the nest . Well , Iwied it , and the result has been , the more I did not grease thebens , the more chickens died , and vice versa . The whole matter , in my experience , is perfectly simple , and so far as practiced with my chickens , has * beeBu successful . When a hen comes off her nest with a brood , she is well greased , and from time to time , while confined to the coop , the operation is repeated , with occasional changes in the position ofthe coops . Should any of your readers try the exper...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
THE FLORIST [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

THE FLORIST The flower garden should at all times be kept free from weeds . If you commence this in season , the work will be comparatively light . Do not crowd your flowering plants .- They must have space if you wish them to show their flowers in perfection . Some require a good deal of room . The Petunia will corer a space of ground too feet square , and will . be all the better for having this room in which to unfold its beauties . So of most other flowering plants . The Verbenas sometimes have a disposition to grow erect , and at others to trail on the ground . They look well when made to spread over the ground , bnt if you desire to make them grow erect , you can train them on frames or sticks . Some hardy shrubbery has a disposition to spread and make unsightly plants . Their growth can be checked by pinching off the terminal shoots . This is very early and quickly done . Hardy perpetual roses , to make them blossom in the fall , should be cut back , so as to make them throw ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
DOMESTIC ECONOMY [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

DOMESTIC ECONOMY Cheap and Good Hoofing . S . K . E ., writes to the Valley Farmer from Saline , county—The cheapest roof that we are acquainted with , and one that we prefer to shingles , particularly as many shingles are now made , is covered with cloth . We know from an experience of more than fifteen years , that when properly made they are not only cheap but good . For the foundation for the cloth a substantial covering of boards should be laid , giving the roof any desired pitch , sufficient to run off the water . Cloth known under the name of burlaps , which is made of hemp , is the best for this purpose . It is woven from one to six yards wide and is much used for oil floor cloths . That which is- 1 J yards wide is usually bought for about 14 cents per yard , but the widest is the best for roofing . It should be spread lightly over the roof and lapped at the seams and well tacked down with small pieces of cloth under the heads of the tacks , a few tacks -should also be put i...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
A Talk with Farmers' Wives [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

A Talk with Farmers Wives BREAD . —Dry bread , crusts , stale biscuit , etc ., I always soak in warm water , mash fine , and mix with milk , when I make bread . The loaves will not be so white , but will be moister—besides , it is economical , and evey housewife must be saving , these hard times . All the cold potatoes that are not hashed with meat , come to our table the second time metamorphosed into light loaves of bread . MEAT . —The best way to use pickled pork , if it is too salt , is to cut it in slices , and soak it over ni ght in milk and water , then roll each piece in flour , and fry in a little butter , the same as fresh fish . It is nice for a change . BEANS . —For laboring men at this season of the year , there is nothing more nutritions and wholesome ; besides , there is no other food of which a little will go so far and do so much good . Boil them three hours in plenty of water , with a piece of pork to flavor them just ri ght . Put in pepper as soon as they come to ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
«« . To Keen Butter Hard and Cool . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

«« . To Keen Butter Hard and Cool . A writer in the Scientific American recommends to the ladies a very simple arrangement for keeping butter nice and cool in the hottest woollier . Procure a , large , new flower pot of sufficient size to cover the butter plate , and also a saucer large enough for the flower pot to rest in upside down ; place a trivet or meat stand , ( such as is sent to the oven when a joint is baked ) in the saucer , and put on this trivet the plate of butter ; now fill the saucer with water , aud turn the flower pot over the butter , so that its edge will be below the water . The hole in the flower pot must be fitted with a cork ; the butter will then be in what we may call an air-tight chamber . Let the whole of the outside of the flower pot be then thoroughly drenched with water and place it in as cool a place as you can . If this be done over night , the butter will be as firm as a rock at breakfast time ; or , if placed there in the morning , the butter will ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
EDITORIAL NOTICES [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

EDITORIAL NOTICES Bower and Reaper Trial . ¦ Atrial of mowers and reapers took place near Salem , Marion county , under the supervision ofthe officers of the State Agricultural Society on Wednesday and Thursday , the 8 th and 9 th July . We learn that three combined reapers and mowers were put on triai ^ k : Brown s of Alton ; Whiteley & Fassler s ; Springfield , Ohio ; and Ruggs , Ottawa . Reapers , — Haynes & Hawley s , Pekin ; and Flagg s , Bloomington . Also , Haynes & Hawley s Illinois mower . On Wednesday , all the reapers , with the exception of Haynes & Hawley s ( called a header , ) were on trial . They all performed well . . All had their admirers . On Thursday , the Header was tried . It is a ponder ous machine , but did its work well . In the afternoon , the combined mowers and the Illinois mower were put upon trial in a beautifal meadow of timothy . Every machine stood up to its work nobly . There were differences of opini...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Southern Illinois [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

Southern Illinois A distinguished Horticulturist , who was at the Reaper and Mower trial , in Salem , on the 8 th inst ., in a private letter to the editor , thus writes : I had the pleasure of visiting Mr . Reynolds farm and saw the pear trees you speak of , and it really made me feel a regret that I was not located in as good a fruit region , especially for pears . The soil of Marion county is the kind for pears . The deep green hue of the foliage of those veteran pear trees was ample proof of that fact . I noticed a singular circumstance as exhibited in that section , that whilst the apple trees were injured somewhat by the severe winter one year ago , the pear trees escaped injury . I am captivated with this portion of the State , as the fruit region of the West . It is not too far south for the apple , and not too far north for the peach . Could I by some legerdemain ( preSto change , ; transfer our establishment , with other advantages , I would do it and pay one half I am wor...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Aspect of the Crops . ' . " . " . . ' „ [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

Aspect of the Crops . . . . . „ At : the time of this writing , we have dry weather .. The wheat crop is about cut , arid the grain saved -in good order . The jiel & has J i ) eeii ; very great . Corn looks -well and is rapidly advancing in growth , though some three -weeks later , apparently , than usual . If the latter part of the summer and . fall are favorable / there will be a heavy crop of corn . Potatoes have suffered from drouth , but still hope . for a good crop . Oats and barley have yielded ( well . Hay , is abundant and sold at reasonable price s . . A good deal of buckwheat has been sowed , and more could be . The early sown looks well . On the whole we are likely to- have a greaVcrop season ; and the prospect is that breadstuffs -and vegetable food will be sold at lower prices than at present . Meats will continue high . jg @* Preparations are now being made for putting in Fall Wheat . -A greater breadth of ground will by sown by far than last year . The dr...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Opening of tbe State Normal University . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

Opening of tbe State Normal University . We have received a circular from Chas . E . Hovey , Principal of the State Normal University , from which we learn that the first- session is to commence at Bloomington on the > fifth of October . Candidates are required-, to be , if males , not less than 17 , and if females , nof . less than 16 years of age . To produce a certificate of good moral character , signed by some responsible person . To sign a declaration of their intention to devote themselves to school teaching in-this State . To pass a satisfactory examination , before the proper officers , in reading , spelling , writing , arithmetic , geography and the elements of English grammar . Tuition and text-books will be free to all students appointed under the following . provision of the statutes \ 7 . Each county within the State shall be entitled to gratuitous instruction for one pupil in said Normal University , and each representative district shall be entitled to gra...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Trial of mowers [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

Trial of mowers The following is the Secretary s Report of the Reaper Trial on the Farm of ! the Hon . James Curtis two miles west of West i TJi-bana . Illinois , July 22 nd , 1857 : About 9 o clock , A . M ., we caine on the ground selected for the Reaped Trial . Itis : field of winter wheat ; on ( breaMngJof last season , containing two hundredancl fifM acres . That parti situated for th eitrial stood : well , was even throughout , and i Would turn . fifteen totwenty bushels per acre . ; Mri ; C ^ estimates it at fifteen bushels ,-while several ; good judges put it at . tweritiy . The mbrn ^ ing was cool and clbudy , giving promise of a comfortable day for the trial . Quite a large number of farmers were pn : th * ground ^ st this early honr ^ and soon ; $ &&> machine s that Were to try their prowiest ; wereseetf coming over the rbllirig ^ ttrairie ; First , we hayetheSel & Raker of Seymour and Morgan of Brockport , ^ N : York , under...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
are Traveling Pedlan . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

are Traveling Pedlan . MR . EDITOB :- ^ - ^ certainly favored withEasterh tree pedlars . We have , laws against persons going about in pur State and selling goods oh samples presented . Our legislators think such a practice hot only favors impQsitiqn on pur people generally , but takes business f ^^ those who pay . taxes ^ and ; rappor ); bur institutions , ; stpid glseiil -io . thpse who . haye ho fujrthet inter- *^ : jthjWr t 6 tajj (§ . money : ftpip us and ppry it |© other States ; ¦ ¦• -- The tree peddling is liable , to great abuse . I have heard several- persons say who ordered , t | ej | f ; by ;^ they were invajijftbjy Hgceiyecl , in their purchiages- —the ifreeB ~ w « re not such as they : expected , and jipy pie ^ ithput any security that they are not the mostWorthless seedlings . . - We have ; now a new species of peddling . Agents are about getting orders for drills , and farmer * are , . giving orders ; without knowjing what they are bBying . TJiepiiis a great differen...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
COMMERCIAL [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 August 1857

COMMERCIAL Springfield Market . Omci oi THE ILLINOIS FASMES ) August 6 , 1857 . \ FLOUR—Extra -white , $ 8 60 ; superfine $ 8 00 ; common J 7 60 WHEAT—Iu demand . Kew $ l 10 ; White $ 1 20 . CORN—Sales at 40 @ 50 cts . * bn . ; white aheUed for bread , Wets . OATS—Sales at 42 © 50 oU . bu . HIDES—Dry flint 14 * ft . BRAN—16 cts . * bu . SHORTS—fine , 100 * cwt . CHICKENS— $ 2 00 * doz . TURKEYS—None ONIONS— $ 2 * bn . POTATOES— $ 1 25 ; new $ 2 * bn . APPLES—Dry $ 3 60 @ $ 4 . BUTTER—15 @ 20 cts . * lb . CHEESE—11 cts . * ft . EGGS—12 @ 12 } £ cts . * doz . HAY— $ 8 * ton . CORN MEAL—80 c * bu . HAMS— Smoked 16 @ 16 % c * ft . MOLASSES—80 @ 85 c * gal ; sugar house $ 1 . GOLDEN SYRUP— $ 1 20 @ 1 25 . SUGAR—Brown , 12 @ 15 c * lb . TALLOW-10 @ 12 c * lb . BACON SHOULDERS—10 @ 12 o . SIDE MEAT—13 @ 15 c * lb . LARD—12 @ 15 c BEANS—3 50 per bush . COFFEE—Rio , li @ 16 V < c * ft ; Java 18 @ 20 c . RICE—8 @ 10 c CLOVER SEED— $ 8 @ 10 ? er bu ; Timothy , $ 3 $£ @ 4CANDLES—Tall...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Inventors . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 September 1857

Inventors . We can scarcely take up a paper at this time which does not contain accounts of the trials of mowers and reapers . We have now lying by as notices of the trials of these machines in St . Louis , in Indiana , Ohio , Marylaud and New York . New machines have been presented for trial , and with few exceptions , it seemed to be admitted that the new inventions , in eome particulars , had advantages over the old . Perfect as the old inventions have appeared to us , it is not doubted that , to borrow the language of the inventor of Brown s reaper and mower — other inventions and improvements will follow until the farmer can attach his horses to a reaper or mower , with as much certainty that it will perform its work well , as be now does when he attaches his horses to his waeon or plow . These trials and those which will follow , will test the value of the new as well as the old machines . At the recent trials great admiration has been expressed with the performances of the ma...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Crops in Illinois [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 September 1857

Crops in Illinois When it was found in spring that nearly the whole crop of winter wheat was destroyed in Central and Northern Illinois , —and added to this , a spring of unusual coldness and backwardness , our farmers were almost appalled by the prospect before them . It was , indeed , discouraging . The broad fields which they expected to see covered with grain , were as bare as the lands of the desert . But they went to work—procured all the spring wheat for seed possible—sowed this seed , —sowed barley , oats , flax seed , corn , millet;—the spring season was cold , backward , —but this weather , which kept the corn back , was just that required for the spring grains—and the result is , that we have now matured and harvested most wonderful crops of spring wheat , barley , oats , flax and millet —( the two last crops small in amount , because little seed was sown;)—and when the spring crops had advanced to a point beyond great danger , the weather became excellent for corn , and ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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