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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 25 A TINY RESERVATION. Philadelphia contains one relic of the days of William Penn which is un known to most inhabitants of the Quaker City. It is a small portion of ground which still retains by virtue of a provision in the charter its original character. Right in the heart of the business section it lies, the only place for miles around that bears no foot prints of the march of progress and commerce, the only building lot in the city .which has never been near the hands of a real estate agent. You have but to go down Walnut Street to Second, turn up Second until you come to a little iron gate on the oast side of the street, swing it back and enter and you stand within the In dian reservation. In the days when Philadelphia used to be the metropolis of the red men, and they came by various trails across the country and down the Delaware to hold council there, it grew necessary for them to have some appointed spot for their conclaves. William Penn dedicatod this ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

26 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. TjEJS ipgel ofporgatory. How many sweet reminiscences this title recalls to a Christian mind. Christmas and the Holy Souls.. How many, we wonder, give a thought to the souls of the friends departed in the midst of the festivities that usually attend the greatest feast of the year? Long usage has allowed the Nativity to become a season of mirth. Innocent merriment is not wrong. The Church even desires that man throughout his life should retain precisely that capa city for enjoyment that is possessed by the child of four or five summers, so that the child's simple faith may cast a halo over his pathway all his days. Long before Wordsworth declared that "heaven lies about us in our infancy," our Lord, blessing the little children, had said: "Whosoever shall not re ceive the kingdom of God as a little child, shall not enter into it." However his intellect may be culti vated, the Church would have her son to retain his child-soul until the hour of death, the innoc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 27 erly spent, the eve of Christmas is a most opportune occasion to pray for our dead. Then, somehow, the mind be comes retrospective. Instinctively wo feel called upon to review the past, and particularly do the faces that were with us Christmasses gone by pass before us, one by one. If a great snow is on the roofs round about us in the vast city, and noise and confusion reign far down the streets, or if all is still over the wide, white landscape in the silent country, and within are lights and cheerful warmth, we look into the glow ing fire and remember. How the pale, dead faces arise from out the ashes and look upon us. If little voices that call us father or mother gather at our feet or fill the room with shouts and merry laughter, at once memory flies back across the years and we ourselves are children once again, listening to voices that we will hear no more on earth, see ing faces that we never shall see this side of eternal life. Then the soul bows down...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

28 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. required. He had faults, for he was human, though God's minister. Like wise he was our spiritual father, and to-night we should beseech God to re member His priests who may have need of His mercy. Thus, while the snow presses down upon the house roof, and clear and keen the cocks are crowing in the early night, while the icicles gleam like pure white candles lighted beneath the moon, and while the embers glow and run into purple flames and drop into ashes, the dead rise around us. To morrow the world will be diademed with the splendor, the melody and merriment of another Christmas, but to-night is ours, and to-night we should pray for our dead, that in the universal joy they, too, may have a share, and that the great feast may sig nalize their entrance into heaven, through the mercy of God, obtained for them through the suffrages of our prayers, perhaps our tears Another consideration yet remains which should influence us toward has tening to relieve the sorr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

The Indian Advocate Devoted to the Interests of the Indian Missions. Vol. XI. APRIL, 1899. No. 2. LAFAYETTE IN AMERICA AND FRANCE. By Ohaiileh J. 0'Maij,i:y. II. Naturally, the escape of Lafayette to America excited no little stir in the courts of France and England. His rank, it was, that attracted attention; his genius was yet unproved. That a marquis of France, a youth attached to his own court, an officer of his own army, should quit home and command, and king and country to espouse the cause of a little band of republicans struggling beyond the sea, seemed at once suicidal and appalling to the French King. Perhaps, we must believe, too, that at heart Louis had some sympathy, as a man, with repub lican institutions. But as a reigning king he must have felt alarmed. A few months before he was on the point of declaring in favor of the colonists. Now their reverses stunned him. He did not wish to bo embroiled in a con flict with Great Britain, and the depar ture to the theatre of w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

j7-"'-J7"fJP"3 30 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Yet a bitterer experience than defeat menaced the heroic American. The term of service for which most of his men had enlisted was oi the point of expiring. For months they had been ill-fed, ill-clad, and of course, ill protected from the weather. It was expected that, during the winter sea son, the British commander would go into winter quarters. But he did not do so. At the head of six thousand regular soldiers Lord Cornwallis pressed the almost despairing Washington mer cilessly. In vain the American gen eral retired before the overwhelming numbers; the Briton pursued with seemingly implacable ardor. During nineteen days the Americans fell back. Brunswick, Princeton, Trenton these alternately the Americans saw and left behind, and yet the English forces were constantly in sight. To render more critical the situation of the Ameri can general, the English commander offered pardon and reward to all who would within sixty days desert the interest...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

i tmrt THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 31 every cause to fear for his safety. Not only was the sea traversed by English ships of all kinds, but to appeasu the English ambassador the government of Louis had hurried two light vessels rapidly to the Leeward and Windward Isles to intercept the young nobleman soon as it was definitely learned that he had escaped. At that period of strife the French Captains did not sail directly to America, but to the West Indies, where they took out papers for France, and, cruising along the Ameri can coast, stole into harbor whenever the way wa3 found clear. The French court pushed forward its fastest vessels, confident that the marquis would follow the usual route. Had he done so he would have been taken. Instead he sailed straight forward, partly through the affection borne him by the crew, and partly through compelling the captain to pass the islands without making a stop. When forty leagues from the American shore they were run down by a small vessel, at the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

TOFWj f""?" 32 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. wWJW and at once Charleston opened to him her most exclusive doors. The Ameri can generals, Howe, Moultrie and Gul den were then in the city, and two days after his arrival the Governor of the State drove in from the country to wel come this French Marquis who had dared come to risk his life for the free dom of America. The new works of defense, including that fort to which the intrepid Moultrie was yet to give his name, were shown him, and he was dined publicly and privately, until, weary, he began to sigh for a field more to his taste. Writing to Madame Lafa yette, June 14th, j.777, after deccribing one of these dinners given in his honor, he confessed: "What gives me most pleasure is to see how completely the citizens are all brethren of one family. In America there are none poor, and none even that can be called peasants." While outwardly seeming to enjoy this round of Southern hospitality, at heart Lafayette panted to join Wash ington in his ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

mmljiom mn.miuJ'i-JWiBWBt'ii-iJU'iJ-'-i THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 33 stock by the lords Bute and Mansfield since his majesty's demise, ho took the resolution suddenly to absent himself from court. His present 'owner, it is said, is very indifferent whether he ever re turns or not, having by the arts and misrepresen tations of those noblemen and others, taken a prejudice against him. etc. etc. Fuller of pent-up hatred of oppres sion, and more indicative of a spirit that neither tyranny nor disaster could crush, were the parodies scattered broadcast in curt reply to the flaming proclamations issued from camp of Burgoyne. One of these signed "Quo modo," after reciting the mock-heroic advantages to be gained by submission to the Crown, sets forth the following test-oath which the citizen, upon mak ing his peace with the invader, would be required to subscribe: I, A. B., do promise and declare, that I will remain quiet, and stand motionless and unaffected as a statue while the Hessians destro...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

34 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. language as this, which was as emphatic as anything Napoleon afterward flung out at an adversary to gain a point. Its unusual tone caught attention. It was a new thing to find a man anxious to serve at his own expense; it was a new thing to find a foreigner exacting this as a right. On the 31 of July, Congress deliberated regarding his proposal. It was decided to accept his proposition, and the conclusion was set forth in a complimentary resolution which also conferred upon him "the rank and commission of Major General' in the army of the United States." Of the officers who accompanied him, those whose services Congress could not accept, it indemnified for the expense they had incurred. And now, the two Generals Howe having appeared before the Delaware Capes, thus endangering Philadelphia, General Washington drew forward his troops within a few miles of that city to protect it, and came up personally to the seat of government. Here Lafayette for the first tim...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 35 unattached to the command of any troops, and remained in the company of the commander-in-chief, as was his wish. He saw at once, which the British did not until too late, that the military tactics in use in Europe were useless here. This was a species of guerilla warfare then unknown on the continent, and which was yet destined to battle Napoleon in Spain. Recog nizing his inadequacy, the boy-general set himself at once to learn this new phase of his science, and he preferred doing so under the eye of its inventor. The greater part of his time was passed in Washington's tent, or in his com pany on the field. He preferred hear ing the deliberations of those engaged in active service, although when called upon he delivered his own opinion firmly, and, in one so young it was considered remarkable that he gener ally esteemed caution preferable to brilliancy. Here, too, he met another soldier of liberty, who was little less remarkable than himself Count Pul aski o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

36 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. w exertions of Washington and his .gen erals to stay their flight, and night came down over the field of Brandy- wine and found it occupied by the enemy. The key to Philadelphia was won by Howe. continued in oun ni:xt. CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE. God and evil have one quality in common, viz.: they infect their sur roundings. Have you never observed the good influence of an angel mother on the entire household? Or, do you not remember how a few perverse indi viduals at school led astray unguarded innocents perhaps yourself among the number and spoiled many a whole some lesson from your teacher? The drift of our times is away from God toward the world. Mankind's oldest and holiest traditions are fast becoming obsolete; even the most posi tive teachings of Christianity are ques tioned, and that by Christians them selves. Such is the result of Godless surroundings. Holy writ tells us that God made man, and then gave him a help-mate like unto himself. The Creator united t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 37 through the sacrament of Penance; she feeds us with the Flesh and Blood of our God in the Sacrament of the Eucharist; and lest in the long and wearisome strife we at last succomb, she invites us most urgontly to return often to that strengthening and life-givingSacrament of Holy Communion. That wo may hold out firmly against the many attacks of infidel scoffers against our faith, the Church fortifies our youth in the Sacrament of Confirma tion. Faith is that divine virtue, "without which it is impossible to please God." Without faith there is no moralit', despite all arguments in the philosophy of hypocrites and world lings to the contrary. At that age when faith is most endangered, the bishop of the Church "signs us with the sign of the cross and confirms us with the chrism of salvation, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost," that wo may pre serve that priceless virtue unsullied, notwithstanding all efforts of satan and his follow...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

"lyiP'T "h i"i"i,jp f 38 TI-IE INDIAN ADVOCATE. jJB'Ajr'JTiewr the Church. Catholics have always believed this dogma from the times of the Apostles until our day. Now why do Catholics of our enlightened nine teenth century still hold fast to this never changing truth, and yet deny it in practice? Why do they rack their brains for only a faint excuse to enter into the holy bonds before a Justice of the Peace, or still worse, before a heretical minister of religion? Why? I fail to see a shadow of a reason. Have you forgotten what your cate chism says about the division of the Sacraments into two classes? Let me remind you of it. There are Sacra ments of the living, and Sacraments of the dead. The life of the soul is sancti fying grace. When that is lost, you are dead in the eyes of God. When you were born, you were dead before God, until original sin had been washed away in Baptism. "Unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Ghost, he cannot enter into the King dom of Heaven." ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE 30 TVie Idiar) Advocate Is n Quarterly Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Tcr., to plead tl 2 em i so of the hist remnants of Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, Industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will bo used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. TIIK INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart I. 0 , Okla. Tcr. Aitkovki) nv Uhjiit RBV. TIIKO. MKKRSCIIAKRT, Vicak ArosTot.ic ok Oklahoma and Indian Tkrimtoiiy. A Quarterly Koviow, ontorcd at the Sacred Heart I'ost Oilicu in Oklahoma Territory, as Hccoiid-class matter. Subscriptions C0 Cents per Yvar. Single Copies 15 Cents. APRIL, 1809. Editorial and Local. A glorious and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

40 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ' Two liars never agree. A circular saw trust is the latest. That's an ugly article to monkey with. Blessed are the Friars in the Philip pines, for they are reviled and perse cuted for their Maker's sake. Lift up Tour eyes to heaven! There is your fatherland. The earth is noth ing but a valley of tears! Our Cuban and Philippine allies have outlived their usefulness. The question now is, how to get rid of them. St. Elizabeth's School, at Purcell, Indian Territory, so ably conducted by the Sisters of St. Francis continues to do God's work among the Indians. It has over 135 pupils. The Choctaw nation has memorial ized Congress for finanaial help, owing to the fact,it is alleged, that federal legislation is responsible for the present indebtedness of the tribe. The Franciscan Sisters of Maryville, Mo., are building a new hospital (St. Anthony's) at Oklahoma City, Okla homa. The contract, we understand was awarded to Messrs. Kennedy and O'Keefe. Hoffman's Catholic...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

fH"?irep f JfPfPTT" " "WUjfc iJwr-T -- I ' THE TNDIAN ADVOCATE. 41 Benedictine Monastery at Metten con tains 60,000, St. Boniface, at Munich, 3G,000 volumes; some German Catholic noble families, even possess libraries of 100,000 volumes. This in one country alone. In France and Belgium the statistics, it is stated, would show results equally encouraging. Those who are pleased to sneer as is some times done at "the non-intellectuality of Catholicism," should ponder these facts before assuming an air of super iority. French Catholics, says an exchange, maintain in Syria, Palestine and Egypt universities, seminaries, hospitals, asy lums, dispensaries, industrial schools and upwards of G,000 primary schools, j in which devoted missionaries, sisters i and priests impart to SO, 000 native children, French civilization, the Cath olic religion and French language. February 10th, the feast of St. Scho lastica, Brother Benedict Doyle pro nounced his simple vows as a choir religious. Joseph Pa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

42 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. evangelist and includes SS. Cosmas and Daraian, St. Eusebns, who afterwards became Pope, St. Blasius and St. Anthony, the founder of the Barnabites. Most of these saintly doctors lived in the early days of the Church, and gave their lives for the faith, thus empha sizing the truth that we must take more care of our soul than of our body. "Honor the physician" says the Scrip ture, and it bids us remember that "all healing comes from God." An unusual excitement occured in our neighborhood a short time ago. One afternoon, sudden and horrible shrieks startled every one in the vicin ity. At first I thought it was merely a fight among some ferocious clogs on the street. As I listened the sound seemed more human, and then I judged it to be some drunken hoodlum. But presently I recognized that it was the voice of a woman evidently in extreme grief and anguish. My God! I thought, what can this portend? She is being murdered! but no, there she stands as Rachel of old, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

mmmmmmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. THE DOG-IN-THE-MANGER SECTS. Cardinal Gibbons' potition to Con gress asking for a reopening of the question of Indian contract schools has aroused the opposition of the Protes tant press of the country. It will be remembered that Congress five years ago passed a law the object of which was to put an end to Government ap propriations to these contract schools, most of which were conducted under Catholic auspices. This was accom plished by reducing the governmental appropriation twent' per cent, each year, so that now the schools receive nothing for their work of educating the Indians. Of course, this program was entirely pleasing to the Protestant mis mionaries, who discovered a dangerous union between Church and State when Catholic priests and nuns performed their labors among the Indians so well that they earned more from the Govern ment than the Protestant Indian schools were entitled to. Then the Protestants were eager to discontinue the practic...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1899

44 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. conclude that the Catholic claim was entirely unworthy. But Cardinal Gib bons, in his petition to Congress refers to this very point, and shows that the Catholic Indian schools have not been fairly dealt with. In fact, ho shows that the Government broke faith with the Church. He quotes the Hon. Thomas Ewing's praise of Catholic Indian schools and then says: "In terras of praise all the other Secretaries of the Interior down to the year 1894 spoke of the Indian religious schools, and, thus indorsing the religious school idea, the Government invited all denominations to engage in the work of educating Indian children. To this invitation, response was made by various religious bodies, and school build ings were erected by them on a large number of Indian reservations, the understanding being that the Government would contract to pay for the support and tuition of all Indian children that could be induced to enter these schoolhouses. Aroused to greater activity b...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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