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Elephind.com contains 1,012 items from Labor Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 23 December 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE The High Cost of Living Holds the Attention of Congress. Strong Editorial From "The Baltimore Sun." 'flic Ilnltimoic Sim in an ediloiial un der the licad of "The Pressing National Problem," says : The numerous measures introduced in Cougicss on the first day of the session bearing on the high cost of living indi cate how piofouudly stiried the whole country is by the existing situation. These bills reflect the popular feeling and the popular demand for lclief. The remedies they piopose aic not neces sarily wise, but the suggestions they embody aic symptomatic of conditions that cannot be ignored and which call for thorough investigation. The ques tion which overshadows all others at present in pressing public interest is that of making both ends meet. The classes to whom this is a ital daily pioblcm arc not important in a financial sense or in an industrial sense, but the are exceedingly numerous. Rich people can stand the piessurc, and organised and skilled woikc...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 23 December 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE Militarism Scored By Matthew Woll at the People's Church Last Sunday A Strong Sermon That Will Be Remembered By Those Who Heard Him. With practically all other organizations and not a few individuals losing their heads and being swept off their feet by panic and fear and cupidity excited by a yellow press and "movie" emotionalism it is to the eternal honor of the organ ized workers of the nation as repre sented by union labor and the farmers' granges, that they have set their faces like flint against the movement to intro duce into this country the monarchial system of militarism, alias "prepared ness." The American Federation of Labor at its recent convention in Baltimore scorned the foul thing and in two reso lutions stamped the serpent on the head. A member of the committee that framed the resolution on the general subject of militarism, alias "preparedness," was Matthew Woll. Mr. Woll is president of the International Photo-Engravers' Union and also of the Int...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 23 December 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE W'lhh PUSH ACTION. Washington. AIUiourIi President Vilson lias lcccivcd indiicct infornia tion as to the cfToits of the railroads and the brotheihood heads to reach an agreement he plans to push his lccont mendations to Congicss and expects ac tion at this session. NOT TO SirAKi: IX "JHVVV." Emplojccs of the Cincinnati and Su hnrban Hell Telephone Company are not likely to share in the distribution of $0,000,000 by the Amciican Telephone and Telegraph Company. This distribu tion was announced in New York Fri day. Vicc-1'iesident Lewis said j ester day hc knew nothing of the fund. lie added it had no connection with the re cent 5 per cent wage increase granted to emplojccs in active service in this sec tion. LOXGSIIOKKMHX QUIT. Savannah, Ga , Dec. 12. About 350 men, affiliated with the International or ganization, quit work today when their demands for higher wages were refused. The men have rcccicd from 10J4 to 18 cents an hour and 22 cents for overtime. Tliey dem...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 23 December 1916

8 THE LABOR ADVOCATE SHOItTKIt AVOItK DAY PAYS. Washington. In the current issue of the Monthlj Kcu'cw, published hj the bureau of labor, the experience of four American and foreign workshops under the eight-hour sjstem is stated. The firms listed arc: Commonwealth Steel com pan), Granite Cit), 111 ; Zeiss Optical Works, Jena, German ; Sal ford Iron Works, Manchester, England; and tin EiiBis Chemical Works, near Liege, licl gium. Regarding the experience of the Amer ican linn, the ISulIetin sas. "The workmen in the open-hearth de partment and boiler room were changed, mlillL', from a s)stcm of two liMiour shifts to one of three eight-hour shifts. To do tins required increasing the num ber of men in the open-hearth depart ment from aa to ;i;i, but in the boiler room it was necessary to increase the number of men onlj from eight to 10 The hour! wage rates of all the men concerned were increased an average of 20 per cent. Exact! the s.ime products were made under the two s) stems of wo...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 23 December 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE STOGI10 MAKKItS WlXXIXii. Wheeling, V. Va. Stogie makers and strippers arc winning their strike for a wage increase. The former ask $1 per thousand, or onc-tcnth of 1 cent on one stogie. Strippers ask for an increase of one-half cent a pound. Manager Ilazlctt of the company formerly con trolled by the late Augustus Pollack is the most obstinate employer the strikers have to deal with. ' Wheeling trade unionists recently ded icated a monument to the memory of Augustus Pollack, whose record of friendliness to the organized workers was continuous. The concern he built up, as a result of this policy, is now in the hands of those who seem to favor contrary beliefs. WlMi UKOK SUNDAY CLOSING San Francisco. Organized butcher workers arc preparing a law to be sub mitted to the next legislature to close all meat markets on Sundays and certain holidays." It is stated that journeymen and employing barbers, proprietors of grocery stores, grocery clerks and re tail clerks will ...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 23 December 1916

10 THE LABOR ADVOCATE gBED QuaittattntetdUrbriitr. tfn.J4a0.14aO n, , a , K , . J001""1 &tr' Telephone Canal 1869. Cincinnati, O. 'llflli iirm IFS RIM For Good Billiaid and Pocket Billiard Tables, Con Home of "The National" COMPLETE LINE OF BILLIARD SUPPLIES lo Ihe , The National Billiard Manufacturing Co. 20 W. Canal Street, Cincinnati, Ohio CIGAICMAKUItS lll LOW UAC.I Lima, Ohio. In a circular issued by Cignrmahen,' Union No :nn striking cigarmahcrs employed at the Deiscl Wcmmcr factories show the low wanes paid by this concern, which maintains plants in sceral Ohio cities, and manu factures the San Felice, IL1 Verso and other brands. On .-.-cent giades, like San Kelice, women are paid $1.20 pci thousand less iiuui men, aimoi mil lie work ol im.ii women arc packed in the same f . and boxes and sold at the same piii.es Men are paid yi'U) per thousand less than the union scale and women .ff 10 less Com pared wiin tne union scale, men hae a loss of M to SO a week, while women sud...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 23 December 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE II 4 - M4 - 4 - - M - 4 WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT Original Articles by Women for Women. .M.f-H"M- THE MAGIC LINES OF LOST YOUTH There Are Ways of Doing Your Hair, Wearing Your Gown and Fixing Your Ribbon That Add to or Subtract Years From Your Birthday. DID you ever stop to think, after you have passed the llappcr unci debutante stage, just why cer tain frocks you wear make you look older and other frocks make you look younger than you i colly are? Cer tain ways of doing your hair, too, add years to your life in appearance, and others trick the beholder to imagine you absurdly young. A pair of ear rings, a necklace, n collar or a bat might each one have this power of adding years to or taking them from your appearance. But did you ever stop to think why? A doctor who knows as much of psy chology as he docs of anatomy recently said that the line of the chin and lower jaw was the magic line of youth. It doesn't so much matter what becomes of your neck, according to this an...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 23 December 1916

12 THE LABOR ADVOCATE a . MOLDKKS (JUT IMG IJAISK In .Wanes and Ki'iliiitlon in Moms UiiiU-r Anrt'cnifiit. Atlantic City, X. J. An advance of IS 1I-S7 per ccrit in wages and a re duction in hours was granted 1-1,000 stove and foundry workers throughout the country under an agreement ratified here today by representatives of the manufacturers and the International Moldcrs' Union. The workday will be reduced a half hour. The new scale will become effective January 1. The men had demanded an increase in wages of 20 per cent and a reduction of one hour in their workday. The compromise agreement was reached after confer ences lasting nearly a week. SKCOM) ItOXUS (SIVIOX. St. Louis. All cmplojecs of the At las Powder Company, scattered through out the United States, will receive a bonus of ID per cent of their monthly wages until further notice, it was an nounced at the offices of the company here today. The bonus is in addition to a ten tier cent bonus for 1010 already awarded, AXTI-UMOX...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 30 December 1916

O!!' r A ", UNlV i.x .TV JAf j i ); LIBRARY INDEPENDENT NONPARTISAN mp' -707"t- N, Property and Official Organ of the Building Trades Council of Cincinnati and Vicinity Vol. IV. No. 37 CINCINNATI, OHIO, DECEMBER 30, 1916 One Dollar a Year v ,'2zmzrnr x w t f . i Kroger' s Sluggers Busy. McDwyer of Massachusetts Draws Ten Dollars and Costs, for Beating Up Two Citizens Who Are Not Members of the Teamsters' Ui 'on. No Arrest Yet of Geo. Scheid Who Testified Last Week That He Secured Two u ten to Beat Up Cooney. Scheid Works For Kroger. If a real insight into' the workings of Kroner's sluggers is desired by any citi en of Cincinnati, he should call on Otto Zicr, wholesale butcher, and get the facts from him about the Landon Court outrage. In the first place, this affair was widely heralded as a "labor" trouble. The daily papers run the account of the affair right under the newspaper account of the injunction proceedings, and con veyed the impression that the "lawless" teamsters were aga...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 30 December 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE i! I CITY TOILERS DEMANDS Approved lly Labor Council, To llfiul I'oi- .Municipal Olllclnls. A new wajje scale, providing for a minimum wage of $S.5) a day and a maximum of $:i, and time and a half for overtime, presented by the city la borers, was indorsed last evening by Central Labor Council. It is said the demands will be presented to city offi cials for action within a short time OrKaimer Thomas C. Farrell, of the Cigar Makers' Union, addressed the Council. lie requested financial aid for striking cigar workers in Detroit, lie was accompanied by two striking girls, who described the conditions in Detroit fhops. During their stay in Cincinnati they will solicit aid from various labor meetings. 12, P. Jiradstreet, Jr. Secretary of Cin cinnati lictter Housing League, asked tile council to indorse a movement to have the Iiudgct Commission restore a budget of $14,(100 for housing inspectors, which has been reduced to $1,000, It was de cided by delegates to write to...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 30 December 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE Would Disorganize Building Trades Norcross Purchase First Move By Morgan Anti Labor Trust To Establish Open Shop Metal Trades Associations' Close Relations With Morgan Proposition, and Selection of Evan Jones, Gives Reason To Believe That M. T. A. Is Sponsor For Reorganiza tion Scheme, and Efforts Will Be Made To Secure Control Of Other Big Building Concerns. The first effective movement by the I ivictai iraaes Association division of J. P. Morgan's $S0,OOO,0l)O,O00 Industrial Conference Board to gain control of a unionized building concern will culmi nate in January when Evan F. Jones, treasurer of the Morgan Spring Co. and one of the leading lights in the M. T. A. crusade against organized labor, takes over the presidency of the Norcross Bros. Building Corporation. This movement on the part of agents of the M. T. A. is approved by the Morgan anti-organized labor trust and then it is intended to include other building concerns friendly to organized labor, all ove...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 30 December 1916

s,wjfiWjKWW!' 4 in THE LABOR ADVOCATE !" INDEPENDENT aMS ynMji.ii w,W!iunuri.iiwmqxgjri ,! I mi IITBT dyocde NONPARTISAN J PPE? FO? ILL 1F0 TOIL Official Orgnn of Tlio HuildliiR Trades Council of Cincinnati and Vicinity Issued Weekly W. E.. MYERS '. Editor Business Office, 20-21 Thorns Building. Phone, Canal 5511 Communications should be on hand not later than Wed nesday to insure publication. Entered at the postoffice at Cincinnati, Ohio, as second class mail matter. ONE DOLLAR A YEAR IN ADVANCE ct2j!ji70 X CINCINNATI, DECEMBER HO, 1010. THE SAME TO YOU. All ! and Monday's the day. WE GOT OURS. We had our egoless eggnog. Did you? AND DON'T CARE. Some fellers don't know how dee) the egg-nog. is. AN OLD SAYING. The Allies seem inclined to look a peace proffer in the mouth. THE REAL CHRISTMAS. Consideration for others that's Christmas. DAYS THAT ARE GONE. How oft to our hearts conies the dreams of our childhood. HAVE ANOTHER. Here's to yourself and your family, may you live long and T...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 30 December 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE I hfi Jones and Spradling Elected Street Car Men Name Their Officers for 1917. A Number of Old Officers Re-Elected. The Queen Citv of the West Division No. G!i" of the Amalgamated Association of Street and Hlcctiie Railway liiiiploj es nciu tncir election on IJecemlier LMst and i elected the following officers for l'.il" ' President, Albeit I",. Jotics; vice-presi-i dent, llan.v Heard; treasurer, Dan Mur-1 nahaiK recouline;secretai., U.S. ISarnes : fma rial sccictsirj, A. L. S)radliii(j; cor-! lespoiulent, V Isiluotir; conductor, Henry Hi can, in; warden, Frank Peters; sentinel, M 1 1 niton; eecutie board mcmbcis: Mriuhton It. W. Lovctt; Fiirhth Stieet J. V Ross; Avomlalc Chas. l!odeu: Walnut Hills F. ISeer-, atie: llvde Paik Stcc McCafTrev : Clifton and Ivlm Wm. W. Smith; Vine Street A. Ilaubrock; Mast Fnd Ftlvv , llrophv : llartwcll Geo Gray. . The re-election of Sccretarj Sprad ling .shows that he lias made nod itH that erj tt.vinu position of secrctaij, and ju...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 30 December 1916

,, xtymwi&sim i,a, THE LABOR ADVOCATE ti l m System Adopted By Ohio Is Praised By Actuary of the Industrial Board. Letter is Sent in Reply to Pennsylvanian. Trust Should Never Rest in Hands of Company, Because Moose Can Give Guarantee of Solvency, According to Emile Watson. Columbus, Ohio. Statements in the orm of prophecies that arc little short of startling are made by Emile E. Wat son, actuary for the State Industrial Commission, with respect to the devel opment of State management of the bus iness of workmen's compensation insur ance. Arguing that the business "creates a peculiar trust that should never rest in the hands of a liability insurance com pany" because no one can give any guar antee of the solvency of a company for even a small portion of the time dur ing which claims will run, Mr. Watson contends it is a proper State function. Then he says : "The facts are that within the brief space of the, last two years seven lia bility insurance companies have been forced to ...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 30 December 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE STUIKKIHtlOAKimS HIGH WM'.K. Indianapolis, Intl. The strike of street car men is proving costly to the local company, according to this s'tale inent published in the Labor Herald: "Pay envelopes have been picked up near the pay car showing that one was paid $n for his week's work and an other $37 for the same time. The com pany boasted in its advettisenient run in all the newspapers recently thai its highest paid union employes were paid about $21 a week for seven days' work, eleven hours a day. And then the com pany turns around and pays strikebreak ers $20 and $:i a week for wrecking its property and, as it is alleged, stealing practically all the revenue. That may be good business judgment, but it doesn't seem so." CAIIIMAOK AVOKKKilK AVIX. Trenton, N. J. Lasl June the Fitz gihbon & Crisp Company locked out employes who arc members of the Car riage and Wagon Workers' Union. These workers have refused to return except as union men, and now the com pany ackno...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 30 December 1916

8 THE LABOR ADVOCATE ft. p at rt FAST FREIGHT TRAINS NOT AFFECTED BY LAW Cleveland. In discussing the Adam son eight-hour law, the Locomotive En gineers' Journal makes a good point when it says : "Trains that get over the road in eight hours are not affected at all." This should appeal to men who cry for nation-wide "efficiency," and it should silence those who insist that the act is simply intended to raise wages. "One of the alienations auaiust the hill," continues the editor, "is that 'it is unworkable' a queer contention. There' was a time when there was no hunt to any thing hut the pay. We finally got a IS-hour day established, then got that reduced to a da) of 10 hours, when over time was figured on the hasis of 10 miles an hour multiplied b the rate per mile the engineer was getting. I lie managers did not like the change, because it in creased the price of overtime, but they hail no trouble in applying it, and there .is no change in the rate per mile in ap plying the Adamsou...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 30 December 1916

THE LABOR ADVOCATE 9 I HOIiDKX CONKIIIMS STOItY. That Itiilli-oiuls mid Itrodici'liood Men Arc- DIclu'i'hiK. Chicago, Dec. 10. Ilnlc Iloldcn, pres ident of the Chicago, Iiurliimton' & Quincy Railroad, who was chairman of the Committee of Railroad Executives which met President Wilson and the brotherhood officials in Washington last summer when a railroad strike was threatened, confirmed today that infor mal conferences had been held by rail road representatives with brotherhood officials concerning a settlement out of court of the controversy between the railroads and their employes. W. G. Lee. president of the lirothcr hood of Railway Trainmen, also' an nounced at Evansville, Ind., last night that negotiations arc under way be tween leaders of the four brotherhoods and operating officials of several rail roads looking to a settlement of the en tire matter before January 1, when the Adamson law is to go, into effect. Hotli Air. Lee and Mr. Iloldcn said, however, that the discuss...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 30 December 1916

"wwiessw.1" ' TTOTlfTW" 10 THE LABOR ADVOCATE ?j?t FtitfMi rS3S3 "Aiii . '-al esl . i jfl $& r1' X. A1 jE5PS"-" jfl I VXaaa! 3BMWnlBJ3lpH I LH sfcxaajjtA A POINT TO REMEMBER We Bnnk on Quality and Win on Price, KAPPNER'S BIG SHOE STORE 1319 MAIN STREET Fancy Shoes and Hosiery for All Union Made Shoci Rtpiind. S & II Gitoi and Surety Slimpj Gien Free. Open EvenlngB Phone Canal 1G0I-R Frederick A. Poweleit, Jr. MAKER OF U A J jP THE ORIGINAL J ClgiHf STRICTLY UNION MADE 68 E. McMicken Ave. FRANK RENN, Prop. Strictly Union Goodi Mercer Hall Cafe 1324 Vint Si., Cor. Mercer CINCINNATI, 0. Telephone Canal 1280-R Hall for Society Meetings Hand's Beer on Tap C. J. LUCHTE & CO. frlEA' COAL and COKE TOURING CARS and TRUCKS for Hire All Orderi Promptly Attended to 113 West 14th St. CINCINNATI, O. Bet. Rice and Elm Phone Canal 1329 Phone Canal 3860-R H. HEITKER DEALER IN FINE BOOTS and SHOES S. E. Cor. Tilth and Culvert Sts. Branch I Pavilion and Btlfitlere Sti. Repairing Neatly and...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 30 December 1916

II H4--H-4-4-'444-U4- 4iAiii4i.i.iiiii.Ai.i.ii.i.i.iiiAiA. THE LABOR ADVOCATE t.tttttttt1 ! t W JLV1YA JUH.JT AJK 1 1V1H.1N 1 i WOMAN'S DEPARTMENT Original Articles by Women for Women. -M NEWEST TEA GOWNS. Hints About Becoming and Beautiful Lounging Robes. Like everything else, llio ten gown, oneo n trailing, clliipliniious nlTnlr. much befrilled and furbclowed, meant for hours of ease, has hud to yield to the exigencies of the times and lias been pro loin, shorn of its train and other extraneous decorations and en larged its functions from tea lime to dinner. It lias come into the category of trainless garments and is sometimes eveu ankle length in its shortness; also the little loose coatee that has come to l)e almost inseparable from it Is lHirsuinj,' ji successful career. A black and white tea gown of much charm lias si fourreau of white brocade crepe do chine, over which Is n flowing overdress, which reaches only to the knees, of black ninon patterned with silver, the bodice ba...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The labor advocate. — 30 December 1916

12 THE LABOR ADVOCATE "TOOLEY STREET TAILORS" Denver. Once upon a time, the story goes, three tailors convened and signed a protest against the then existing condi tions. It was resolved that "We, the people of England." The modern version of this incident is now heing staged in this city where six men, styling themselves the National Association of Nail road Employes, noti fy President Wilson that they represent the J,500,000 railroad employes "not af fected by the Adamson law." The nations' chief executive is as sured by these tailors of Tooley Street that their organization "will in no wise be a union of menace to the peace and prosperity of the country." All of which the president is expected to interpret that the prototypes of Tooley Street do not fayor trade unions or the railroad bro therhoods. It is no secret that this "organization" is being encouraged by the railroad man agers. A similar movement was started last August by an individual in the south who claimed to 'represe...

Publication Title: Labor Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
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