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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1904

Livestock Industry Nice Lot of Yearling Lambs. The fine illustration shown on our first page depicts a scene that touches the heart of all true stockmen. There is nothing they like more than to watch a flock of fine, healthy sheep or a herd of fat, sleek cattle. The sheep in our illustration were a bunch of fifty head range bred yearling wethers, purchased for the lowa agricultural college last August, to put on the col lege farm to clean up some weeds in the stubble. Fifty head were selected and given grain feed during the last sixty days and exhibited at the Inter national Livestock Exposition at Chi cago in December, 1903, and were awarded first prize in their class. The remainder of the bunch had no grain whatever, but made good gains and topped the market for range yearlings. The carload made the lowa college a profit of about $200, and were kept al most entirely upon feed that could not have been utilized in any other way. The animals were purchased in the stockyards at South ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1904

14 of the farmer because he ships his young stock out of the country with out finishing them and does not keep them to sell as fat cattle, so that it is impossible for a local butcher to keep young beef on the block. I claim that the people of our cities are crying out for better meat for their tables every day and are perfectly willing and able to pay for it. The most pleasing thing in marketing fat cattle is to get the top price of the day and the only way to do this is to obtain the best grade of steers with which to begin. This can only be done by seeing that they are bred alon? the right lines. The Individuality of the bull has much to do with the profit when me steers are sold. i Conditions in Idaho Sheep. Conditions on the ranges of Idaho do not seem to be very favorable this ppring. A combination of circum stances have worked to retard both cattle and sheepmen. Monte M. Gwinn, secretary of the Idaho Wool Growers' association, is authority for the state ment that it is an ope...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1904

spring in sheep. There is an appar ent relation between the period of gestation and the period required for maturity. Quick-maturing breeds ap pear to carry their young for a shorter period than those requiring more time to mature. Large lambs are on the average carried for an appreciably longer period than small or medium lambs. Those dropped before the 144 th and the 149 th day of pregnacy are lacking in strength and vitality at birth. Shropshire ewes are more prolific than any other breeds and crosses, except the fourth cross of Shropshire rams on a Merino ewe foundation. From the data obtain able, it is apparent that twins are the normal increase for ewes of the mut ton type. One-year-old rams are not so prolific as those two or three years old. Ewes average a larger percent age of increase in lambs after reach ing full maturity of three years until after they are six years old, when the rate of increase diminishes. The amount of service required of the ram in breeding has an in...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 May 1904

16 Convince Yourself I *§JHii|i NIPT nrOAl lOf your neighbor has one of the other kind of *Vl^m I! 11l nrliAlli^r Separators, and thinks it the best there is, not having tried \/?£^v J\J\J I ULmKJrYKJ v/l— any other make, is this any reason why you should be induced V jfr-A to get one of the same kind? Just because you thought any certain machine the best there was Jvjf* A some years &B°} is it an reason why this should be the case now? The world does not stand still, otherwise there would be no improvement. The TUBULAR SEPARATOR stands at the L\/^--~^WrfSl^ head of the list today as a triumph of American inventive ingenuity. By turning the crank of VSsflH,' liM^ any other make and then that of the Tubular you will convince yourself that the Tubular is the I i i iWri iBBI machine you want. By taking the bowl of any other make apart and spreading the contents on I k \ Wai ' flli il a table and tnen setting the Tubular bowl alongside of it, in its three pieces and figuring on 818 ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

Seattle Daily StarwitK The Ranch One Year, only $1.60 l^B*7-^^! I&. J^^^F r ~^-^3§J '^H ■■ H_«riMkk. ' '' . VOL. XXI. No. 10 MONEY IN ANGORA GOAT RAISING ££ a NGORA GOATS are proving /% of great worth to the farm- • ers of the middle west in the clearing of brushy and practically waste lands," said John W. Fulton, of Helena, Montana, secretary of the American Angora Goat Breeders' Asso ciation, while in Seattle on a recent visit to the Puget Sound country. "They have already increased the value of such lands in these states to the extent of fully $500,000," continued Mr. Fulton, "one individ ual alone, an lowa farmer, it is said, having profited in this respect to the extent of $25,000. Numerous tracts in the eastern states have been cleared by the browsing of An gora goats, and, hav ing been well en riched by these ani mals, are now splen did pastures for dairy stock today." The Angora is a natural browser and a most effective worker in ridding was.c lands of brush and weeds. I...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

2 States. The consumption of all An gora products is rapidly gaining in this country, and the demand for breeding animals for eastern shipment is also increasing with each succeed ing year. The Angora industry is one well justifying the attention of owners of suitable range lands along the Sound. It is but in its infancy in this country and will unquestionably be come a prominent factor in the live Sock industry of the United States in the near future. A catalogue of government free lit erature and other publications on the subject has been issued by the breed er's association and will be sent to any one forwarding his address. The ac companying table, conservatively com piled by practical breeders and appear ing in the last report of the commis sioner of agriculture of Montana, will give an idea of the results it is pos sible to attain from ranging a flock of these animals. In the table no con sideration is given their value to their owner in the clearing and reclaiming of waste la...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

THE RANCH With which is consolidated Thf Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. PHIL. L. AXLINO, Bditob Associate Editors: F. Walden. H. L. Blanchard. MILLER FREEMAN - - Publisher Seattle, Wash. Editorial Offices: Tel. Main 1265—Long Distance Connection. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle, - - Third Floor Downs Building. Spokane, Alexander & Co., 521 First Aye. Subscription (in advance), one year, 50 cts.; six months, 30 cts. If on time, sub scription will be one dollar. Seattle sub scribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and sala ries paid. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

4 Horticultural Notes By F. WALDEN. , W. J. Langdon, of Sumner, under date of April 30, writes as follows: "Dear Sir—Can you tell me if the trouble with the inclosed limb is due to the oyster shell bark louse?" There is no question but the limb is affected with this particular louse. Happen ing to meet A. Yon Holderbeke, state horticultural commissioner, the limb was shown to him when he pronounc ed the infection to be the oyster shell bark louse. The tip of the limb is dead but whether this is the result of the presence of the louse or from some other cause, we can not deter mine by this twig alone. If the in sect whose presence is shown on the limb has been on the tree for some time the probability is that it caused the limb to die. The remedy for this louse is to spray with the sul phur-lime wash the same as for the San Jose scale. But this must be done while the tree is dormant. That cannot be done before next winter. If the insect likely to prove injurious to the trees during t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

kept this gentleman from rushing right off and buying that orchard was the lack of funds. It is our duty to correct such false ideas, for they do incalcula ble harm. Once in a great while some one may clear $500 on an acre of apple orchard. I have done that, but not often. We should learn to look on things of this kind in the long run, and not the short run. How the thing pans out after a series of years, and not for one year, is the question to be asked. * * * In the last issue of The Ranch I referred to Prof. Woodworth's bulle tin of the codling moth. Since then I have received several copies and am delighted with the instruction to be found in this bulletin. Profs. Wood worth and Clark, as mentioned in these notes before, take nothing for granted but go into the field and carry on their investigations. We have had the same thing done here in Washington by Prof. Piper, Prof. Lawrence and El dred Jenne. In this bulletin the fact is brought out that in certain condi tions of climate...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

6 THE DAIRY The Outlook for Storage Butter. It is the opinion of the editor of the New York Produce Review that, as we approach the season when, in the natural course of events, the produc tion of butter will far exceed the con sumptive demands and when the sur plus will accumulate in cold storage, it is well to consider some important features of the general butter situa tion that they may have a proper bear ing upon the basis of storage opera tions. The carrying of surplus summer butter product in cold storage should not be regarded as a mere specula tion; it is a necessary function of the trade by which the natural extreme fluctuations of value are lessened and by which the total production of but ter may be largely increased; and the healthfulness of the butter indus try as a whole depends upon the con duct of this important phase of sum mer accumulation upon a basis that shall prove reasonably profitable. Of course the basis of value at which surplus butter is stored is al ways...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

perior dairy cow of a superior fami ly, with pedigree which gives assur ance of calves equal to the dam, if not better, is always worth a large price. Such an animal adds much to the average value of any dairy herd. In buying registered cattle deal only with men of reputation as breeders and of strict integrity. "The best part of a pedigree is the name of the breeder." Economy in Separators. The best possible time to separate cream from milk is when first drawn and while the animal heat is still re tained, is the observation of T. L». Woodhouse. If allowed to cool and then be heated to the proper tempera ture for skimming, complete separa tion is more difficult to attain. The farm separator is in just the position to save all loss by taking out the cream before the milk cools or be comes acid. The best types of farm separators are so simple that a child can take them apart and put them together, and run them without any danger if proper care is given to oiling the fast running parts...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

8 IN THE HOUSEHOLD Edited by Mrs. S. C. Butcher. For the Evening Meal. Cooking during the hot weather is one of the greatest tasks women have to perform. But the work may be greatly lightened by preparing the evening and midday meals at the same time. In this way we save fuel and keep our rooms cool and pleasant. If a little forethought is used the even ing meal may be made very attractive and appetizing. This plan may seem out of reason to many who for years have been accustomed to three warm meals daily, but a trial will convince almost every one how much more en joyable is one meal of this kind each day. Cold meats, salads, fruits, cold tea or lemonade, with nice home-made bread and butter, make a meal to tempt a king, besides requiring so lit tle time to prepare it. Here are a few reliable recipes which may be of value to some who may wish to try this method: Potato Salad. —Boil potatoes (whole) until done, drain the water off and let them stand on the stove for a few mo ments, ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

8 IN THE HOUSEHOLD Bdlted by Mrs. 8 C Butcher. For the Evening Meal. Cooking during the hot weather is one of the greatt'st tasks women have to perform. But the work may be greatly lightened by preparing the evening and midday meals at the same time. In this way we save fuel and keep our rooms cool and pleasant. If a little forethought is used the even ing meal may he made very attractive and appetizing. This plan may seem out of reason to many who for years have been accustomed to three warm meals daily, but a trial will convince almost every one how much more en joyable is one meal of this kind each day. Cold meats, salads, fruits, cold tea or lemonade, with nice home-made bread and butter, make a meal to tempt a king, besides requiring so lit tle time to prepare it. Here are a few reliable recipes which may be of value to some who may wish to try this method: Potato Salad. —Boil potatoes (whole ) until done, drain the water off and let them stand on the stove for a few mo ments, ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

of them without falling through. Then fasten securely to the box. Always test your eggs in a closet or dark room by the aid of a lamp. Place three eggs in the tester and look through them toward the lamp. If they are clear all through they are fresh, but if they pre sent a cloudy appearance or have dark spots in them they are unfit for use. Keep eggs in a cool, dry place and they will stay fresh much longer. Some Uses of Eggs. The unbeaten white of an egg makes an excellent substitute for mucilage. To cover jelly glasses so the jelly will not become mouldy, cut circles from writing paper the size of the top of the glass to be covered, paste it well with the white of an egg and press firmly down onto the top of the jelly. To Boil Eggs. —Place a small sauce pan of water upon the stove and let it come to the boiling point, then drop in the eggs; set the pan where it will not boil and let them stand ten minutes. You will be surprised how much nicer your eggs are than when cooked in the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

of them without falling through. Then fasten securely to the box. Always test your eggs in a closet or dark room by the aid of a lamp. Place three eggs in the tester and look through them toward the lamp. If they are clear all through they are fresh, but if they pre sent a cloudy appearance or have dark spots in them they are unfit for use. Keep eggs in a cool, dry place and they will stay fresh much longer. Some Uses of Eggs. The unbeaten white of an egg makes an excellent substitute for mucilage. To cover jelly glasses so the jelly will not become mouldy, cut circles from writing paper the size of the top of the glass to be covered, paste it well with the white of an egg and press firmly down onto the top of the jelly. To Boil Eggs.—Place a small sauce pan of water upon the stove and let it come to the boiling point, then drop in the eggs; set the pan where it will not boil and let them stand ten minutes. You will be surprised how much nicer your eggs are than when cooked in the u...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

10 Poultry Interests _ BY H. L. BLANCHARD. __ A Flock for the Family. Leaving out the matter of profit and of selling eggs, there is much pleasure in keeping a small flock for family use. A few hens can be kept at a less cost, proportionately, than can a large num ber, owing to the fact that the scraps from the table are valuable. No labor of consequence is necessary, and when an account of the year is kept, the small flocks will be found to have given quite a profit in the conversion of the waste material into eggs. There is no way to procure eggs as fresh and nice as those produced by your own hens. If they are of a choice breed, the pleasure will be greater, as well from pride in endeav oring to excel as from good manage ment. Eggs and Poultry. It is not difficult to keep two or three hundred hens on a farm, and two or three hundred dollars thus picked up will buy all the extras a farmer finds necessary to purchase during the year. In this way he need not go in debt for the numer...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

When Moses Lake Broke Loose. The floods in the Big Bend and other sections of the state this spring caused more or less damage to bridges and ranch property, but no section carries the interest that does the Moses lake section. In this part of the state there occurred a change that will more than likely be lasting. The bursting of the natural dam at the south end of the lake and the subse quent cutting of the channel has left a broad creek where none before existed, and the washing of the sand first and the clay after has resulted in the mak ing of an area of the finest alfalfa loam in the state. By this freak of nature Thomas S. Blyth, owner of large areas of land and big herds of cattle in the Moses lake country, ob tains some 400 acres of fine soil that was formerly considered worthless. He says it is worth about fifty dollars an acre now and will raise fine crops of alfalfa, being so situated that irriga tion is easy. Some idea of the immense volume of water that escaped from Mo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

12 Ranch Legal Department Edited by R. J. BORTBR. This department is open to all the patrons of The Ranch. Inquiries on legal matters will be answered free in these columns. If a reply by letter Is desired enclose a fee of One Dollar to R. J. Boryer, care The Ranch, Seattle. Negotiable Instruments. By saving the few next issues you will have the entire negotiable instru ment act of Washington. Form of Negotiable Instrument. — (1). It must be in writing and signed by the maker or drawer. (2). Must contain an unconditional promise or or der to pay a sum certain in money. (3). Must be payable on demand, or at a fixed or determinable future time. (4) Must be payable to order or to bearer. (5). Where the instrument is addres sed to a drawee, he must be named or otherwise indicated therein with reas onable certainty. Certainty as to Amount —The sum payable is a sum certain within the meaning of this act, although it is to be paid. (1). With interest; (2). By stated installments; (3). By s...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

LUXURY OF HOME WATER WORKS (Clarence D. Skinner, Kansas.) The new system of underground "air pressure" water tanks for farms and villages promises to revolutionize that class of homes, as much as did the wire fence telephones, as it gives to the farmers all the water privileges enjoyed by their city cousins. With a small outlay of from $40 to $140, every one in the country may have water "under pressure," i. c., for the bathroom, closet, kitchen sink, stock trough, lawn sprinkling, and last but not least, for fire protection. The principle involved in this new luxury is as old as the "penstock" of 1840 by which our grandfathers conveyed wa ter from the spring on the hillside to the watering trough at the house through hollow logs. The windmill or gasoline engine now takes the place of the hillside spring; iron pipes displace the wooden logs and the faucet holds the water in reserve until it is needed. Science has, however, added a new feature, viz., the airtight underground iron tan...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 May 1904

14 Livestock Industry Devons Wanted in South America. Did all ranchers, who are in posi tion to raise more cattle than they do, appreciate the fact that livestock bred and raised on the Pacific coast are in great demand in foreign countries, there would be more such cattle rais ed. Experience has shown that our cattle, when sent to certain countries, do better than those coming from the eastern states and in consequence the demand for our stock is great. The following letter from L. V. McWhorter & Sons, the Devon breeders of North Yakima, shows that the possibilities in the stock breeding line here are immense and will continue to* increase as our state becomes more thickly settled and as the buyers in foreign lands come to know our cattle bet ter. Incidentally the Messrs. Mc- Whorter show also what The Ranch is capable of doing for those who use its advertising columns and keep their names before our readers from Jan uary Ist to December 31st. They say: "We want to express our ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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