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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1990

December 1990/ January 1991 REGISTERED BBU BEEFMASTER bred cows, calves and service age bulls. Vivian W. Evans. (703) 682-4457. FOR SALE—Purebred Simmental Bull. Polled. Two years old, (804) 525-3647. REGISTERED POLLED SHORTHORN service age bulls. Also a few open and bred females. (703) 825-0590. REGISTERED ANGUS BULL—2Vi years. Excellent performance and EPDs. Sunshine Farm, Blacksburg, Va. 24060. (703) 951-7234. LIMOUSIN BULL—Purebred, excellent conformation and size. Seven months old. $900. (804) 561-2836. REGISTERED ANGUS CATTLE—BuIb, calves and cows for sale Call (703) 228-8496 or 2881. FOR SALE— Registered, polled bulls. Twelve to 15 months. Crewe Va. 645-9193. CLASSIC RESTORED—Buena Vista saddles your grandfather rode. (804) 899-6400. FOR SALE—Six month old registered walking and racking filly. Excellent flat and shod prospect. Natural gaited. (703) 789-4613. HANOVERIAN AND CROSSBRED—Weanlings. Broodmares. Selection of 2-4 year olds. Starting $2,000. Central Manor Farm. (804) ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1990

f K -Z W - '<*» «ww mm «p mm Life Insurance. Regardless of your life insurance needs: • UNIVERSAL LIFE • TERM LIFE PROTECTION • ANNUITIES AND IRA's • SINGLE PREMIUM WHOLE LIFE • MORTGAGE CANCELLATION • DISABILITY INCOME COVERAGE Give us a call. Helping You Is What We Do Best. VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY EARLY SETTLERS INSURANCE COMPANY SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU ANNUITY INSURANCE COMPANY 200 W. GRACE ST., RICHMOND, VA 23261 804-788-1234 __ _ I U WL Augusta County Farm | Bureau won the Superior County Award for points eight categories as as the Outstanding Membership Achievement Award for the largest gain (122 members) J| over quota. These and other : , jjfe- $ awards were given during Jk I the 1990 Virginia Farm j| Bureau (See V Pages 1 and 7-10 for conven- | . tion highlights.) Moments after accepting the membership award, Augusta County Farm Bureau President Charles Wonderley asked county secretary Nancy Wheeler (s...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1991

Farm Bureau Vol. 50, No. 1 AFBF Convention Delegates voice concerns for property rights From AFBF and VFBF reports PHOENIX —Fourteen Virginia Farm Bureau Federation voting delegates helped shape national policy during the American Farm Bureau Federation's 1991 Annual Convention here, Jan. 6-10. Virginia voting delegates included VFBF President C. Wayne Ashworth of Pittsylvania County, VFBF Vice President Bruce Hiatt of Carroll County, William Hale of Madison County, Evelyn Janney of Floyd County, E.W. Stone of Grayson County, Scott Tweedy of Campbell County, and Frederick Graham of Wythe County. Alternates were Cecil Meyerhoffer of Rockingham County and Bruce Hogueof Albemarle County. Farm Bureau women also played a major role. Attending as voting delegates for the AFBF Women's Committee were VFBF Women's Chairman Helen Neese of Shenandoah County, Patsy Liskey of Rockingham County, Mildred Hale of Madison County, Pat Padgett of Surry County, Carol McComb of Loudoun County, Joanne Bu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1991

2 Farm Bureau supports federal child labor laws With less than 2 percent of the nation's population still residing on farms, few Americans today realize or understand the necessities of rural life. Urban Virginians are no exception Today, farm family numbers are declining near population centers at an alarming rate. It's little wonder then that most Americans have little knowledge of farm life. The farming environment has an array of nuances totally removed from the lifestyles most of us enjoy. One such difference is the dependency of farm families on their children's assistance. While urban teenagers are delivering pizzas, working in fast food restaurants or in a mall, farm children are mastering many different tasks, and usually at a much younger age. In fact, many begin working in some capacity before age 12. Therein lies a current problem in the Old Dominion. Virginia employers have been confused over two different sets of laws which govern the labor of children. There are both ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1991

February 1991 Mark your calendar Feb. 11-12: Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Presidents' Conference, Lynchburg. Contact Brad Lowery, VFBF field services director, 804-225-7525. Feb. 12: Friends of the Industry of Agriculture monthly meeting, Holiday Inn Midtown, Richmond, 8 a.m. Contact Robins Buck at 804-371-6094. Feb. 13-15: Holstein Beef Production Symposium, sponsored in part by Virginia Tech. Harrisburg, Pa. Contact Bill Collins, 703-231-7601. Feb. 14: 4-H Day at the State Capitol. Contact Rudolph Powell, 4-H youth specialist, 804-524-5965. Feb. 14: Madison-Rappahannock Fruit School, Graves Mountain Lodge, Syria. Contact Jim Saunders, Madison County Cooperative Extension Agent, 703-948-6881. Feb. 15: Winchester Fruit School, Winchester. Contact Gary Deoms, Frederick County Extension agent, 703-665-5699. Feb. 18; Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Speakers Network Workshop, VFBF headquarters, Richmond. Contact Greg Hicks, VFBF communications director, 804-225-7527. Feb. 19: Virgini...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1991

4 Delegates approved about 200 AFBF resolutions (Continued from Page 1) Rico, voiced strong opposition to the federal no-net-loss wetlands policy, as well as other government programs which strip the basic freedom to farm. Overall, delegates approved nearly 200 resolutions and recommendations on issues ranging from fiscal policy to water rights Delegates, representing all facets of agriculture, urged that the 1990 Farm Bill not be re-opened. "Those advocating a revisit to the farm bill generally do not agree with the thrust of market-based agriculture,'' said AFBF President Dean Kleckner. The delegates also took a tough stance for reform of world agricultural trade. The strongest stance came on property rights issues such as wetlands regulations. Recognizing that not all wetlands are equal in value, the farmers and ranchers opposed a national no-net-loss policy governing wetlands as they are defined. VCfetlands regulation was only the beginning of the meeting's recurring theme — pro...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1991

February 1991 Start lettuce to cure February itch February is the longest, not the shortest, month of the year for gardeners like me. Sure, the calendar says 28 days, but it neglects to mention the mid-winter warp in the space-time continuum. It stretches those 28 days into what seems at least 45, as you wait for the soil to warm enough to begin planting outside. Luckily, there is lettuce. Truly a spring green, lettuce can be started in February, scratching a good portion of that gardening itch. Transplants set in cold frames in March will be harvestable by late April, if not sooner. That first salad always tastes great. There are several types of lettuce from which to choose Leaf lettuce comes in first in the race to the salad bowl, so it's a must on your seed list. Head lettuce is typified by the iceberg lettuce you buy at the store, though homegrown is much tastier. Butterhead lettuce is somewhat of a cross between the two, with a looser head but significant crunch in the buttery...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1991

6 Parents gave Short lasting love for forestry By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Edtor Dr. Shelton H. Short 111 recently moved from Richmond to Clarksvilk —back to his roots. In Southside Virginia, he grew up learning about forestry from his parents. Having made forestry his life, the doctor of history is proud that a forestry center now exists in Mecklenburg County in honor of his late parents, Del. Shelton H. Short Jr. and Bess Jeffreys Short. The forestry center, dedicated June 26, is in a stand of loblolly pines the late Shorts planted in 1955. The former General Assembly member and his wife were born in rural Southside, where they were long-time tree farmers. Short and his wife, Jean, carry on the tradition and support forestry in many ways. On 8.2 acres, the county forestry complex includes a lob-cabin style office completed in 1990 and a relocated fishing and hunting cabin Short's father built in 1937. A nature trail is proposed to be blazed on the grounds this year. In...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1991

February 1991 Insurance mandate on fertility costs fails committee By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast EdHor RICHMOND—The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation notched its first policy victory of the 1991 General Assembly Jan. 17 when a measure failed to force health insurance companies to pay for fertility procedures. The House Corporations, Insurance and Banking Committee voted 10-9 against a bill which would have required insurance coverage for in-vitro fertilization. The process can cost tens of thousands of dollars during the effort to conceive a child. Farm Bureau opposes government mandates that would force insurance companies to cover specific medical costs which benefit only a few but are charged to everyone. "This bill would have increased premiums to health insurance subscribers by about $28 dollars a year,'' said VFBF President C. Wayne Ashworth. "Health costs are already rising at the rate of 20 percent annually, forcing more rural to go without any health insurance," he added. The V...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1991

8 New chairmen, committees announced The new year got off to a good start for Farm Bureau Women at the American Farm Bureau Federation's 72nd Annual Convention at Phoenix, Jan. 6-10. Berta White of Bailey, Miss, was reelected chairman of the AFBF Women's Committee. Linda Reinhardt of Erie, Kan. is the new vice chairman. Filling Ms. Reinhardt's unexpired term in the Midwest Region is Patricia Baldwin of Ohio. Helen Neese State Women's Chairman Farm Bureau WOMEN Also elected to the committee was Martha Ahrent of Arkansas. Other reelected members are Carolyn Hegel of Indiana.; Thelma Grovatt of New Jersey; Sherry Say lor of Arkansas. A special honor for Virginia women was the recognition we received for our fundraising efforts for the American Farm Bureau Research Foundation. We raised more than $5,000, helping our state top all others in contributions and the number of contributors, which was 53- A big hand goes to all who helped. I was happy to accept these awards on your behalf. At ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1991

February 1991 Give to the Research Foundation to secure the future Dean Kleckner AFBF President Hearing AMERICA Farmers have always had a soft spot for scientists. We're quick to embrace the newest breakthrough. We may reason that we're eager for progress. But I do know a few farmers who adopt the latest technological or production improvements primarily to win neighborhood bragging rights for biggest yield, most acres harvested in a day or most little pigs born per sow. Farm Bureau has always had a close working relationship with scientists. Since our formation, most of the scientists were affiliated with the university Extension system. Whenever we had a problem that needed solving, we could go to them for prompt, accurate advice. That was their job —to help farmers grow more crops and produce more efficient livestock. And, way back, they needed to keep us happy because, in many states, a county couldn't have an Extension agent unless there was an organized Farm Bureau. Now, the c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1991

10 Hypothermia is a very real winter danger By TOM AND JOANNE O'TOOLE Outdoor Journalists Hypothermia is a word that means something bad. It is literally a deadly enemy. It kills more outdoor enthusiasts every year than anything else. Hypothermia is the rapid and drastic chilling of the body's core temperature (normally 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit), and begins when the body loses heat faster than it can be replaced. As the body temperature drops because of exposure to cool air and cold water, things begin to happen in a predictable sequence. Left unchecked, it affects one's mental condition and physical reactions, and can result in unconsciousness. The ultimate result is death. While cold rain or wet snow, combined with a brisk wind, create classic conditions, hypothermia is not exclusive to northern winter weather and bitter cold. When water temperatures are 50 degrees Fahrenheit or less, and air temperatures are as high as 60-70 degrees, hypothermia is possible. Given the right set of...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1991

February 1991 Registered Angus Cattle—bulls and heifers. AHIR records. CaW (703) 228-8496 or 2281. Registered Poled Shorthorn—service age buls. Also a few open and bred heifers. (703) 825-0590. Registered Polled Hereford bulls—breeding age. Crew, VA. 645-9193. Beefmaster—U-grade bred cows, service age bulls and spring bull calves. Call Vivian W. Evans (703) 682-4457. Registered Angus Buls—several to select. Wl rent or sel. Graperidge Farm. (804) 556-4212. Goochland, VA. Purebred Charolais Cows and Bred Heifers—no papers. Selling due to ill health. Nickelsvile, VA. (703) 479-2141. Nice group of purebred Angus cows for lease. Excellent milkers and performance breeding. (804) 823-4900. Ten Registered Angus Buls—wi rent or sel. Box 115, Goochland, VA 23063. (804) 784-5145. Two WHbourne saddles, rebuilt. One rebuilt side saddle. (703) 867-9450. Miniature—tiny show quality mare. Baby doll head. From champion Hussler line. (804) 829-5583. For sale—pleasure riding horses and mules from $400...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1991

I Vv I ■ I I I p I p 1 If I | I Vol. 50, No. 1 THE VOICE OF VIRGNA'S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS February 1991

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1991

Farm Bureau Vol. 50, No. 2 L km IPPrLi 4 ■■ c ""' a a «, : > ' lm. ,-JHHHHI The Farm-City Festival Reception Jan. 23, sponsored by the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Women's Committee, was a chance for 47 legislators, aides and state officials to talk with Farm Bureau members and staff. Women's Chairman Helen Neese (left) is introduced to Secretary of Natural Resources Elisabeth Haskell by Lt. Gov. Donald Beyer. In all, 86 people attended. (Phote by Greg Hicks) General Assembly Lobbying brings some ag victories By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RICHMOND —Legislation backed by the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation enjoyed mixed success at the halfway point of the 1991 General Assembly, while most bills objectionable to farmers failed to clear their respective houses. Topping the Farm Bureau's priority issues list was a measure that would force state agencies to estimate the impact of all new state regulations on private propertyvalues. Viiginia Farm Bureau Federation Pre...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1991

2 Exports to Middle East rising despite Persian Gulf war While the Persian Gulf crisis will have dramatic effects on various industries in many nations, American and Virginia agriculture appear to be avoiding the brunt of war-time recession. Other than small rises in the cost of fuel and fertilizer, and the loss of one tobacco market, farmers won't be greatly affected. In fact, U.S. agricultural exports to most of the Middle East are rising. Ships loaded with American commodities for other nations in the region continue to sail unimpeded to their destinations, despite the war with Iraq. Saudi Arabia, for instance, may boost its annual purchases of U.S. agricultural products from around $500 million in fiscal 1990 to $700 million or $800 million in the 1991 fiscal year, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation. That is due mainly to a barley export enhancement program worked out with the Saudis and a larger demand for poultry. Other Middle East nations such as Turkey may also...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1991

March 1991 Nursery plastic as hay cover one way to recycle By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON Farm Bureau News Editor Large sheets of white plastic that were put on plant houses in November to slow temperature changes and shield plants from the elements are coming off in late March and early April at nurseries around the state. Instead of throwing the plastic away, some nurseries are offering it to farmers and stable operators who can use it for covering hay bales, equipment or other large items. "This gives us a chance to recycle the plastic to some point," said Jim Bruce. He and his wife Marguerite own Hanover Farms Nursery at Rockville, where they use the plastic on houses of groundcovers like periwinkle and ivy. They can reuse some of the plastic to temporarily cover daylilies and other plants grown in gallon containers. But much is left over. Generally, the plastic cannot be reused on plant houses because staples used to attach it to frames leave holes in the edges. If staples aren't used ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1991

4 Placing an ad? Paper printed 10 times, rates low Early in 1991, the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Board of Directors decided to publish 10 newspapers, instead of 11. A postage increase and other costs make the change necessary. The Farm Bureau News reaches more than 95,000 homes in Virginia. Our readers are nonfarmers as well as farmers. We continue to mail the paper at bulk non-profit rates. While we are cutting one issue, we offer you 10 chances to make your goods and services known to our readers. Traditionally, we print a combined December-January issue, to allow our small communications staff to work at The Farmers Market (Continued from Page 11) FOR SALE—CUSTOM made black walnut gun cabinet $500. (804) 577-2826. HOMEMADE POTPOURRI —3 samples fragrant or simmering spice with receipes and price list $2.50. Write Andrew Adams, Route 2, Box 133, Hardy, VA. 24101. Will sommerset resident reorder. Address lost. DISCOUNT HEATING OIL and diesel fuel. Montgomery and Pulaski countie...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1991

March 1991 SPRING PLANTING TIME SfiLE! ORDER NOW WHILE STOCKS ARE LARGE SAVE UP TO 50% HOUSE OF WESLEY, NURSERY DIVISION, BLOOMINGTON, ILLINOIS BUSHEL BASKET SIZE y, PRICE SALE V CUSHION MUMS Reg. $2.00 ea. 4 I 10 For $1.98 20For $3.75 COLORADO JL 40F0r56.95 BLUE SPRUCE r»■ * 1/1- __ZT_ —HI IJ!IU II — wonderful offer on popular Cush- A \TT (I> 1 a;< S/VIO K E TREE —«3>hU.-M _ 1-,,-iifti ion Mums! There are dozens of O\TT Y* 1 1111 Pfl Pink red, yellow blooms on every A tpitW vL. „i y O 0»O 17 pr P ,ant These flowers grow more 3 For $2.90 mfam luNal iD 1 .5() Pfl. rOF / O v. '•' '.- l ,-\ beautiful and bloom every year- fi p nrt K 7 c *1 vu. n n a- aa ' : " '' : " with little or no care. They will add 0 POr $&.7o ' 3\W' TM «t>4.UU V- C* endless for you? uv* 9F or $8.50 - jajfr/ffir vs\#T ln Ju| v when most other trees have auit blooming, the *•* ing room. These are our choicest 18 For $16.75 .*« beautiful Pink Mist Smoke Tree (C...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 March 1991

6 Big Savings ON HOMELITE LAWN & GARDEN PRODUCTS! A complete line of Homelite Products is available. Call Virginia Farm Bureau at (804) 225-7515 for more information. WALK-BEHIND MOWERS...MOW LIKE A PRO! HomeKte Side Discharge Homelite Super Bagger • Easy fingertip pull recoil starting. Model jt $ Model • Reliable 4-hp Briggs & Stratton QUANTUM • Solid-state ignition. HSD2OV r" y HSB2I engine. • 3.5-hp Briggs & Stratton SPRINT engine. Bag Optional f y L-4^* x • Easy fingertip pull recoil starting. • Large deck opening with flexible, hinged / / / V\ \ V •21 in. cutting width. plastic discharge cover provides superior / a IV • Solid-state ignition. discharging capability. J 1 • Deluxe handle mounted controls. • Optional 2V« bushel easy empyting rear bag. L rffTSsS&jfc • Big 3-bushel easy on, easy off bag. • No rust die-cast aluminum deck. • No rust die-cast aluminum high-vacuum deck. • Fingertip height adjusters from 1 1 /2" to 3 1 /2 oi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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