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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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IT IS AN ILL WIND THAT BLOWS NOBODY GOOD. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

IT IS AN ILL WIND THAT BLOWS NOBODY GOOD. A STORY BY NELL VAN. [Written lor tbe Press.] Farmer Huntly was driving slowly home from town one bright autumnal clay, when, in passing the school house, a merry group of children came running out—it being the hour for dismissal. Pausing a moment, the good-natured farmer called out, "Are there any little boys and girls going my way who would like to ride home with me ?" Now Farmer Huntly was extremely fond of children, and, having none of his own, he depended upon his neighbors for much of the real enjoyment of life; for who can say that a home without children is as complete and satisfying as the one where the noise and tumult of childhood prevails ! The farmer had no sooner tittered those words than two little boys and a girl came running out from among the others. Baying "Yes, we would like to ride home ever so much, Mr. Huntly." "Well, jump in then, Netty, and sit here on the seat, let Bob sit alongside of you, while little Jim tumbles ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
UP COUNTRY LETTERS—No. 5. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

UP COUNTRY LETTERS—No. 5. [Written for the PnKM.J Farmers' Homes. Deaii Reader: —I was wondering to-day as I rambled among the emerald hills, so soft Avith the fresh young grass, which hurries to welcome the early showers of this luxurious State of ours, why it Avas that formers, as a class, give so little time and attention to the beautifying of their homes inside and out ? Is it because poverty is a hard master and most of them are poor V or that when so many natural beauties surround them, they feel not the need to bring them into door yards, and living rooms ? Are they, as a class, of a rougher, coarser, material than their city brotherhood, who many times spend more than they possess, in adorning their homes and themselves V I think not; for the family I am stopping at are well to do farmers, with blooming daughters, Avho enjoy the woods, and a ram ble among the hills and dales, as much as I do; with souls pure, and minds gifted, tho' untrained; loving the beautiful everywhere,...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A CHAPTER FOR THE MONTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

A CHAPTER FOR THE MONTH. March. Few have sung thy praise^, vigorous and spirit-stirring March; yet I owe much of happiness, even to thee; and though thou art somewhat rough and blustering, I hail thee as a friend. There is no deception in thee. Thou elaimest not more than is thine own, and never seekest to delude us with false pretenses. There is a true, honest heart in thee, that I love. Thy sister, May, is a coquette, the gypsoy ! She advances with a smile; and the hoary Earth grows warm at her presence. She whispers winningly by, and the young blossom lifts its delicate head. Even the old trees are moved; and they send forth their buds to welcome her. But woe for the hope ! and woo for the trust! Too often is that dangerous smile a herald of the impending storm; and the tenderling that trusts too far, is left to perish by her untimely frost. Yet thou, good March, cold, and shrewish and wayward as thou art, hast none of this in thy nature. Thou comest with a frown but it is a righ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Marriage vs. Celibacy. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Marriage vs. Celibacy. Marriage, says Jeremy Taylor has in it less of beauty, but more safety, than tingle life; it lias not more ease, but less danger; is more merry and more sad; it is fuller of sorrows and fuller of joys; it lies under more burdens; it is supported by all the strength of love and charity, and those burdens are delightful. Marriage is the mother of the world, and preserves kingdoms, and tills cities and churches, and heaven itself. Celibacy, like the fly in the heart of an apple, dwells in perpetual sweetness, but sits alone, and is confined, and dies in singularity; while marriage, like the useful bee builds a house and gathers sweetness from every bower, and labors and unites into societies and republics, and sends out colonies, and feeds the world with delicacies and obeys their king, and keeps order, and exercises many virtues, and promotes the interests of mankind, and is that state of good to which Clod hath designed the present condition of the world. Puobt...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Harvesting Machines. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Harvesting Machines. Reaping machines are peculiarly American. Although dreamed of and rudely experimented with in other countries for generations past, it was American genius and skill which turned these dreams into realities and produced the first really practical reaper and mower. The first reaper, Mr. McCormick's, as made in 1848, was a queer and cumbrouslooking affair, yet it did good work, because it was founded on correct principles of construction, the same principles which, it is worthy of note, are to be found in one form or another in every machine of the present day. There is an old cut extant which shows the old reaper, and which would bring a smile to the face of our readers could we show it to them. This, however, we cannot do; but, in place thereof, we give an illustration of the McCormick as made in 1871, the so-called "Advance" reaper and mower. The Advance is a self-raker, cutting a swath five feet wide, ami delivering the grain at the side of the machine, where i...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CROP PROSPECTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

CROP PROSPECTS. Never in the history of the State has so great an area of land been plowed and planted as this season. Plowing and planting has been pushed almost continuously since the first rains, and never before, in California, has there been so little interruption to this work from either rain or the lack of it. The last storm has done an incalculable amount of good; but of course it has not secured a crop. The great dependence, after all, is upon the spring rains. Without them, hardly any amount of rain in January and February will avail much in maturing the grain. Should the Spring rains be anything like abundant, the high prices which are sure to continue, will make the present the most prosperous season in its agricultural restilts of any which has proceeded it in the history of California. The war in Europe, has closed too late in the season to admit of any benefit therefrom to the agricultural interests of either Germany or France. The season for planting will bo past ere...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOUSEHOLD READING. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

HOUSEHOLD READING.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mixed Dishes. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Mixed Dishes. Simple food is always the easiest to digest; but when pec^le will mix up different meat dishes and highly seasoned, they should always be freely mingled with such things as celery, cauliflower, spinach, lettuce, and such easily digestible vegetables; for these, taken with concentrated food, give lightness and porority to what is eaten, so that it can be more readily attacked and assimilated by the digestive fluids. Each dish of meat should be served with some pleasant acid. Oysters and fish should be flavored with sections of lemons; mutton may be garnished with a little currant jelly; roast beef or turkey or chicken should come to the table with celery salad, and so on through all the mulifarious rounds of of meats. A celebrated French cook, once declared ho could give a dinner with which not even the most fastidious epicure could find fault, and yet one from which no symptom of indigestion would arise, though hours were spent at the table, and rest in sleep sought im...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Wood for the Kitchen. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Wood for the Kitchen. Never use green wood in the kitchen. There is a saving of from one-quarter to one-third of quantity in using dry wood, according as the wood is more or less thoroughly dried, to say nothing of thesaving of time and temper. If thoroughly dried the latter is the correct figure. There is no simmering with dry wood; but a brisk, cheerful fire, which never goes out till you have done with it. Then again you can always have a bed of bright, live coals, for broiling, or any other purpose, instead of the dead, smoking embers which result from burning green wood. With dry wood your meals may always be served promptly; while cheerful faces and bright eyes enliven the kitchen. With green wood you can never depend upon your fire; the room is always full of smoke and unsavory odors which find their way into your butter, your cream and your milk, and the whole house is more or less effected; while everybody is cross and ill-na-tured with smarting, and blood shotten eyes. In ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
New Bread. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

New Bread. New bread is not unwholesome if properly made. It was prescribed in former times, when bread was honestly made. In England there is so much inferior flour that great adulteration is induced to give whiteness to the loaf. In Paris and Vienna bread is always eaten fresh and no evil results. French bread is mostly Orust. The secret of its excellence is in using the least amount of yeast and the greatest manipnlation. Machinery is largely employed to insure thorough mixing, so that "a little leaven leaveneth the whole lump." The best mortar is made by sj:>aring the lime, fining it to dust, and mixing it so effectually that every particle of sand gets a touch of lime, there being no excess in places and deficiency in others. So it is with breadmaking. The moi*e you knead the dough the more you ripen the mass and the smaller is the quantity of yeast required. It is affirmed by the journal of Good Health that when bread is thus ripened in the dough it may be eaten fre...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Domestic Receipts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Domestic Receipts. To Bake Apples, take out the cores and fill or partially fill the cavities with crushed sugar; place the apples, so prepared in a deep dish or tin, and pour hot (not cold) water in the tin; bake in a quick oven,and you will have baked apples that are delicious. Mashed Potatoes. —If potatoes served to the table mashed, are first baked instead of boiled, as is the usual custom, they will bo found far more white and mealy, and of a delicate delicious flavor. The improvement in the dish is well worth the extra labor. Apple Flitters. —Beat three eggs, the yolks and whites separately, add the yolks to the milk, and stir in the whites with as much flour as will make a batter. Have ready some tender apples, peel them, cut them'in slices around the apple, take the core carefully out of the centre of each slice and to every spoonful of batter lay in a slice of the apple, which must be cut very thin. Fry them, in hot lard, to a light brown on both sides. Custard Cake. —Two c...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Hints. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Mechanical Hints. A Valuable Composition.—Dr. Scherzer, an Austrian official at Pekin, has sent to his Goverment some specimens of a Chinese composition called "Schioicao" which has the property of making wood and other substances perfectly water-tight. He says that he has seen in Pekin wooden chests which had been to St. Petersburg and had come back uninjiired, and that the Chinese use the composition also for covering straw baskets, which are afterward employed for carrying oil long distances. Card-board when covered with the composition, becomes as hard as wood, and most wooden buildings in Pekin have a coating of it. It consists of three parts of blood, deprived of its fibrine, flour of lime, and a little alum. If the composition alluded to actually posesses the properties ascribed to it, it is certainly very valuable. Closing Ckacks in Stoves.—lt may be convenient to know a ready method of closing up cracks, -which are not uncommon, in oast-iron stoves, and we are assured that ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Life Thoughts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Life Thoughts. The best consolers of human hearts bear broken hearts in their own bosoms. It is better to endow one man, who will work as the Father works, than a hundred charities. The essence of a kiss, as of a contract, i.s consent; without that it is not a kiss—it is an insult. Principles believed will add fiber to the soul; but sentimental cant clogs the soul with dead matter. The Sabbath does not stand on argument alone, but on the everlasting want of the human soul, of a seventh day's rest. If the proud man could only see the vacancy his death would make, he would not be so vain of the place he occupies in life. If you study history, you will find all great actions, whether bad or good, in the periods of transition from one state to another. The violet grows low and covers itself with its own leaves;and yet of all flowers yields the most delicious and fragrant smell. Such is humility. If prayer does not cause us to leave off, sinning will soon make us leave off praying. "Cult...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Be A Man. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Be A Man. Foolish spending will ever be found to be the father of poverty. Do not be ashamed to work, and of hard work. Work for the best salary or wages you can get, but work for half price rather than be idle. Be your own master, and not let society or fashion swallow up your individuality—hat, coat and boots. Do not eat up, or wear out, all that you earn. Compel your selfish body to spare something for profits saved. Be stingy to your own appetite, but kind to other necessities. Help others, and ask no help for yourself. See that you are proud. Let your pride be of the right kind. Be too proud to be lazy; too proud to give up without conquering every difficulty; too proud to wear a coat that you cannot afford to buy, too proud to be in company that you cannot keep up with in expenses; too proud to lie, or steal, or cheat; too proud to be stingy. Pleasube.—What we need now in life, above every thing else, is Christian men who take the lead in manly pleasures and make them honorabl...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
NEW ZEALAND FLAX. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

NEW ZEALAND FLAX. The Commercial Importance Of this textile dates to a period some 30 or 40 years back, at which time small vessels were employed to go over to New Zealand from Australia for the purpose of trading with the natives or Maoris, as they are called, for the flax; paying therefor with guns, ammunition, blankets, and cooking utensils. The fibre was prepared, at that time, by a very simple hand process —the natives using a cockle shell to scrape off the outer husks from the fibre. This, as may be supposed, Avas a slow and tedious process; besides being very wasteful. One half the fibre, at least, was lost, and only the best kinds could be used. After scraping, they bleached. But this trade could only last while they were so desperately anxious to secure fire arms for defensive and offensive purposes. Those knowing their position amidst endless intestine wars can understand it; but as soon as this demand was satisfied they gave up producing it for commercial purposes, and th...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
LETTER FROM SANTA CRUZ. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

LETTER FROM SANTA CRUZ. Messrs. Editoks. —Since writing my last we have been visited with a succession of rains, which have elicited from all, the welcome announcement that the country is safe. Santa Cruz certainly never before had finer prospects for the coming season, and the farmers are everywhere jubilant. We learn from reliable authority that Rev. S. H. Willey has accepted a call from the Congregational Society of this jdace, at a salary of #1,800 a year, and a house provided for his residence. The Skating Rink is in full operation and is quite a popular place of resort. One sees about town an unusual mnnber of arms held in slings, sprained ancles and wrists, besides heads badly bumped, among sedate heads of families, as well as the younger portion of the community, which shows that the people are never too old to a]>preoiate a little fun. The great feature of the past week has been a grand Masquerade Ball given at the Pacific Ocean House, on the 22d, in honor of Was...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL VALLEYS OF HUMBOLDT CO., CAL.- No. 1. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

AGRICULTURAL VALLEYS OF HUMBOLDT CO., CAL.- No. 1. [Written for the Pbesb.] Mad River Valley. 1 While the lumbering interests and resources of Humboldt county are well known to nearly all, the extent and capacity of its agricultural advantages and interests are little known outside of the county. Its greatest disadvantage is in being so far removed from mai-ket; having but one accessible port of entry and no overland communication with the lower valleys. The farming districts of this large county run diagonally from the coast back into the interior and southern portion of the county, where may be found rich bottom lands, lying along the different streams that flow into the ocean. The valleys are well watered, adjacent to heavy forests, of fertile soil, and afford the best grazing lands to be found in the State. Mad River Valley is situated about twenty miles north of Eel river, and is a beautiful strip of farming land, with a delightful climate and exceedingly rich, loamy soil. Mad ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SANTA CRUZ FARMERS' CLUB. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

SANTA CRUZ FARMERS' CLUB. [Rt'liortcd for the Pukss by RoriKit Conant.] The club met in the Court House on Saturday afternoon, Feb. 18th. Mr. Locke presented some samples of different varieties of ajiples raised on his ranch at Bean Creek, near the ruins. They are very large in size and of fine flavor. Plows and Plowing. Subjects coming up for discussion, Mr. Mathison wished to know if the draft of the plow now in use was not heavier than it should be V Plowing with a team, two or three days, seems to completely take the vim out of them. He wished to know how a gang-plow affected a team, and if it worked a team down as much as the common plow V Mr. Kingsley thought the gang-plow was an imposition on a good team. He discarded all other plows as soon as Smith's patent came into use. It was a cast steel plow with a thick mould board, and cost #21. Mr. Bawin thought it would be easier for the teams, if the draft could be raised as high as on a wagon. Mr. Kingsley had doubts whether hors...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Meteorological Observations. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Meteorological Observations. Ax Sacramento. 0m,., BY THOS. M. LOGAN, M. D. Permanent Secretary of State Bourd of Health. I,nt, W «141" N., Long. 12I IJ'2S)'44'/W. Right at Levee above moan low tide, at San Franuifoo, 74 left. Hiahtof lower turfaoe of mercury, 94 fei't. The amount ofeloudines* i* dexiffnatod by figures, lit being entire cloudiness; 5, half cloudiness; », entire clearness; and intermediate numbers in proportion. The foroe of the wind is also registered in the Mine manner; 0 being a calm, 1 a very light breeze, ami 10 a hurricane. The means are derived from three daily reading! at 7 a. M., 2 P. M., anil H p. m., in uniformity with the arrangements of the Smithsonian Institute. * Tbermometograph. t Rain. Hkmabkh.—We have experienced daring the week the heaviest rains of the Reason, measuring, as shown in our table, nearly one and a quarter inches, and swelling the aggregate of the season, in thin locality, to 5,309 inohei. The storm on the night of the 20th was very gen...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Meteorological Observations in Tulare County. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Meteorological Observations in Tulare County. [Deported oxpreaaly for the Press, by Ihaao B. BUMFOiu), of Orange Grove.] Our rain for this season lias been as follows in 1870: A storm of Oct. 23, 24, 38 and M (.'live us .. .80 Nov. 6 SO „ 7 10 „ 2fi I Dec. 3 kih „ S 30 „ 15 60 Total 3.15 Total rainfull for January, 4.41); xince than, on X\w -»t I■ of Februan we hud M «. on the loth .45, on 14th .'2A, and on Kith .08, makiiiK a total for the season, up to date, of 5.20 ini-lm-. Success in Business. —Success in the business world usuully depend upon being thoroughly prepared for its duties. Young iueu! if you would succeed in your business career, secure a good practical business education. This question being settled, the next is where to go. Why, go to the best, of course. Go to Hevld'b BumHIM COLLBQB, locat d in the new College Building, '24, Post Street, Sun Francisco. This is the only school upon the Pacific Coast where young men can depend upon being thoroughly fitted for Hunker...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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