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Title: Land, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 504,191 items from Land, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Destruction of Rabbits. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

Destruction of /Rabbits. An interesting case to landown ers, especially those living in the vicinity of railway lines, will come before court shortly. Molong Pas tures Protection Board lias decided to prosecute tlie Railway Commission ers for neglecting to destroy rabbits between Molong and Amaroo 011 railway land. The Chief Commission er has notified the Board that lie "is not the owner or occupier of the land in tlie terms of the Pastures Protec tion Act," and consequently he will defend, the action. As it is known that miles upon miles of railway lands are infested witli rabbits, some one should be responsible for their destruction, so perhaps this action will satisfactorily determine, tlie mat ter.

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW NEEDLEWORK. A HUCKABACK WORKBAG. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

NEW NEEDLEWORK. A HUCKABACK WORKBAG. : J Luckaback is almost never out of ?fashion with the needleworker, as it is easy to work and easy to wash. To make a work bag., cut two pieces 10in. long and Sin. wi-le, turn in an inch and a-half at top for frill, sew up edges., and run casing. A raised "monogram in centre of front worked in two colors, with the same tones in ribbon drawstrings, is a .simple de coration ; more elaborate is a darned border around the four sides of bag back and front, or a deeper band across bottom and a narrow one the ?depth of the top frill.

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Government Grants. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

Government Grants. All grants made by tlie Government to councils for parks and recreation grounds are hedged with a restric tion that the money must be expend ed within six months, or the unex pended balance refunded. Taree Council having had such a grant, ap plied for an extension of time. The. Lands Department has replied, con senting to this, and allowing two months extension. Councils should remember this, and see that the money is spent. The Public Works Department has informed the Grafton Council that it has no funds from which a special grant of £1500 to erect market build ings could be made, nor was it the practice to make grants to councils for such a purpose.

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE NEW MATINEE HAT. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

THE NEW MATINEE HAT. The double hat is a cariosity of the week's shows. .n. large picture hat conceals within it a fetching little skull cap of lace or tinsel embroidery ending in a tassel. When in obedi ence to impatient requests to " take your hat oil'"' the lady removes her headgear at the matinee (or even in church !) the cap is in place, and looks extremely smart. While on the subject of hats, let me add a simple recipe for cleaning white straw hats. Mix lemon juice in powdered sulphur in a saucer, and apply to the "hat with a small brush, then rinse in clear cold water, and wipe with a dry cloth. This treatment will not only clean, uut win also whiten sun burnt straw. Dry in the shade. If a sailor hat lay it on the table to keep tne brim flat.

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Gas and Water Works. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

Gas and Water Works. The manager of Litligow Council's gas and! water works, submitted a report of the work of the past-year, which showed a great increase in every branch. The "National Advocate" says: "Notwithstanding the protests of tJie Wellington Municipal Council, the Public Works Department has cHr cliarged the men at the new water supply and handed over the keys to the council. The aldermen desire !o have a report from an engineer be fore taking it over. The council is : already saddled with a scheme, which proved a failure after an expenditure of £13,000, on which interest is be ing paid."

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MADE FEATHERS. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

MADE FEATHERS. Hardly any plumes are seen now except " manufactured" ones. All kinds of birds are asked-or hot asked-to furnish forth the trap pings of vanity. Coques' feathers are formed into very smart-looking' ruffling, one row of which amply trims a large hat. In blue on black it is very much thought of. White coque feathers adorn black hats, then the " treated" ostricli is made to look quite stiff and thin, each frond being thinned out till a very pretty effect is obtained. These stiff feathers are the development of the *' drenched" ostrich plumes of a few 3rears back. They are also made out of goose quill feathers, turkey feathers, and other barndoor fowl adornments. The long " weeping" os trich plumes are still the pride of the milliner's showroom. Longer than ever, they now curl at the ends. They are very beautiful indeed, and ex ceedingly highly priced. One liat of black velvet massed with pale pink feathers which ended in a high mount at the side, was priced at £15.

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SUBSTITUTES FOR SERVANTS. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

SUBSTITUTES FOR SERVANTS. Mrs. Holman. wife of the-Attorney General. lias written two articles in the " Daily Telegraph" dealing with the dearth of domestics, and these are both well-written and ablv reasoned out arguments in lavour of women doing their own housework for the simple reason tnat they can't get anybody to do it for them. " For every evil under the sun, There is a remedy or there is none." ran the old rhyme. Mrs. Holman inclines to the belief that there is no remedy to the existing state of affairs other than is implied by every housewife being her own maid. The sudden drop in sociablencss and narrowing down of life to a mere sor did grind of hard work is taken into consideration by the writer, who thinks, however, that by calling in the aid of the children to do little " chores/' and by teaching the man of the house not to expect to be waited upon, much of the actual manual labour of the average . house would "disappear. Architects, it is urged, are greatly to blame, b...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FOR THE CHILDREN. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

FOR THE CHILDREN. The annual meeting of the Babies' Home last Wednesday gave occasion for Mr. Holman, the State Attorney General, to bring up the subject ol child rearing. This Babies' Home is in Waverley, and run by Mrs. Greig-Smith, who was the originator here of the Norland system of nurs ing. Lady Dudley believes in the "Norland" nursing so strongly that she has a Norland nurse in her own nursery. In the "Home" the same system of nursing is applied to the babies of poor mothers unable to meet the expense of having a Nor land nurse of their own. The .Nor land Institute has been called by some " The Babies' Boarding House/' and it is a fact that from infancy children are cared for by the staff of nurses. One baby was taken in a fortnight ,old ! The dieting is most scientific, and every care is taken of the little " boarders" at both the Institute where they are " paying guests," and at the Home, where they are not. The mothers of the Home babies, who are mostly working girls, pay ...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PAINTING ON SILK. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

PAINTING ON SILK. l-Iand-painted silk is being -much used ft^Sst at present for trimming hats and gowns. Stencilling is some times substituted. The effect of a large hat with its underbrim made of white corded silk liand-paint.ed with roses or lilies of the valley is very strikingly original and dis tinguished. The stencilled work is quite feasible to those women who have not the artistic skill necessary for painting. Cutting stencils is the only part of the work that requires skill. If it be found too difficult, an artistic friend can usually be found who will da that part of the business. The colours, brushes, &c., are all-obtainable -at city stores. Stencilling is mucli in vogue also for ornamenting curtains, tablecovers, and loose linen covers for chairs and sofas.

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A YOKE FROCK. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

A YOKE FROCK. For a baby such a pretty little yoke frock was seen lately. The yoke and sleeves are eut in one straight piece, .and the tucks are taken across the yoke, not lengthwise, as is usual, the fullness at the shoulder giving that .necessary for the sleeves. It is this arrangement, of tucks which lends the frock novelty, and the making is of ?the simplest, for the frock portion is .cut straight, and let into the yoke. The letting out of a tuck or two "would allow for growing, and one or ?two might be put m. the sleeves- and let out in the same way.

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

/ ^ r' V " 0* ' ' 1 1ilf f ' The Great Fertile Northern State # ? 4 ? Unrivalled in Resources. Liberal Land Laws. Conditions under which Crown Land may be acquired. Government Land may be acquired under various modes and on easy terms, full particulars of which will be supplied free on written or personal application to-The Land Settlement Inquiry Office, George Street, Brisbane, or to any District Land Office in Queensland. The most popular modes are: Agricultural Farms Land suitable for Dairying and General Farming in areas up to 2,560 acres, at from 10s. per acre upwards on 20 years' terms, without Interest. Dairying Scene, West Moreton District, South Queensland. Grazing Selections Areas up to 60,000 acres, suitable for sheep and cattle breeding, are obtainable under lease for terms of 14, 21, or 28 years at an annual rental of id. per acre upwards. The average rental for Grazing Selections in the whole State is 1 id. per acre. Prickly Pear Selections The freehold of first-class...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Veterinary ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

f = -- ==^ (c=j| Veterinary j>o) i=D G~ Correspondents, when < asking for advice on general cases of disease, should be careful to supply the following information: 1. Age and. Sex. 2. Date on which sickness commenced. 3. Full symptoms of disease or injury, with particular reference (when indicated) to the breathing, presence or absence of pain, condition of the bowels. 4. State if other animals are affected. 5. If hand-fed, state nature and quantity of food given. 6. Mention what treatment has been already carried out. ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. Mittagong.-The bull referred to probably lias an inflamed condition of the organ, due to abrasions, which may have become infected. The treatment to adopt is hot fomenta tions to the part outwardly twice a day, followed by syringing out the part inwardly with a lotion composed of two tcaspoonsfui of boracic acid to the pint of water. Cease using the bull till swelling subsides. If this treatment is not effective, write again, ...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CONTAGIOUS MAMMITIS. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

CONTAGIOUS MAMMITIS. This is an affliction of the udder which may cause great loss to any one who is unfortunate to have the disease in his herd. It is not a dis ease that causes much alarm when first noticed, for it is usually mild in character, and being confined en tirely to the udder, does not affect the cow's general health. There is iittle or no swelling or heat, and handling the udder does not cause pain. Usually, all that a dairy farm er notices is some "curdy-looking" milk coming from one, or perhaps, two, quarters. Pie pays little atten tion, beyond milking the affected quarter, either into a separate pail, but more often on to the ground. Even when other cows become similarly af fected, he is not seriously" alarmed, but perhaps thinks it peculiar that so many cows should have colds in the udder at the same time. It is only later, when he finds that the milk secretion from the affected quarters lias assumed 1 the appearance of a dirty-looking, thick, yellowish char acter, ...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DISEASES OF THE HORSE'S FOOT. Sand-Crack. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

DISEASES OF THi£ HORSE'S FOOT. Sand-Crack. A sand-crack is a fissure in the horn of the wall of the foot. It may be narrow or wide, superficial or deep. Again, the crack may extend from the hair of the coronet to the ground sur face of the foot, or only a portion of the way. Sand-cracks are usually found at the toe of the hind feet, and at the quarters of the fore feet. If the crack is so wide and deep that sand and dirt may get into the soft structures of the foot, which is shown by the crack bleeding, the mat ter is serious. In some eases a stink ing discharge issues from the crack. Lameness is frequently severe, and shows mostly at the trot. It shows less on soft ground than on hard. The lameness is due to pressure on the soft part of the foot from the movement of the edges of the fissure. If sand-cracks are neglected, they frequently result in very serious com plications, which may cause the loss of the horse. Treatment aims at preventing the extension of the fissure, and perma ...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TICKS SPREADING UP NORTH. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

TICKS SPREADING UP NORTH. Since the beginning of the new year the cattle ticks that have been infest ing the northern border of this State have spread a little further west, and a larger area has been quarantined in. consequence. This affected portion of the country embraces the parishes of Donaldson, Lindsay, Uoomi, Wooden bong, and Coutts, is just outside the north-west boundary of the Kyogle quarantine area, and right up to the Queensland border. An energetic in spection is kept up with a view to discovering the eii'ects of the spread of ticks, and the necessary fences will have to be erected. Provision will also have to be made for certain de pots where the infested animals may be treated.

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
REPUTATION DESTROYERS. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

REPUTATION DESTROYERS. "North Coast Farmer" writes-. There are many factories on the North Coast which are in every way quite up to date, and are a credit to the parties concerned. But there are some which require more frequent visits from the Inspector. One of these places was visited by the writer recently, who found it anything but savoury. The lloor appeared to have been unswept for days, and the smell of rancid butter rose up in protest everywhere. It was a well-equipped factory, too, with plenty of space for all practical purposes. Now, it would be utterly impossible for that factory, even if the manager got the cream of the right standard, to turn out a first-class butter. It may be that the manager was discouraged by such quantities of low-grade cream that he was obliged to handle, but two wrongs cannot be turned into a right. These are the sort of cases which strengthen the case for compulsory grading. Both the management and the farmers need educating in a case of this kin...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DOES IT PAY TO SHOW? [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

DOES IT PAY TO SHOW ? Dairy cattle breeders are ' often heard to say that it does not pay them to exhibit at the shows. The idea is a mistaken one. A man may be able to rest a while on his laurels, but he must first of aii win them. He can only succeed in doing this by pit ting his stoc»c against the best that his neighbours can trot along. Those who have experienced the benefits of this form of advertising say that the gains by this plan are very consider able. Besides tnat, he has the satis faction of knowing that he has helped to instruct the public and helped the fair along, rle is, indeed, a partner in a co-operative plan of instructing the public. All such gatherings tell the people Avliat advances the breed ers are making in the most important industry of uie State. Besides that, the men with any interest in their work are spurred on to formulate some sort of ideals. The producer should never make the monetary gain the centre of his satisfaction. The prize money ought to be a...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FASHIONABLE CATTLE. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

FASHIONABLE CATTLE. 1'n most dairying districts various breeds of dairy cattle become fashion able, but the dairy farmer is fickle, and cattle fashions, like ladies' fa shions, are constantly changing, but in the xuclimond River district, and the big scrub district of the North Coast, the Jerseys undisputedly have a great hold. Naturally, the Jersey fanciers evinced considerable interest when it was known that Mr. Iligin botliam of Armidale, had placed his well-known champion Tilbuster Jer sey herd in the hands of Mr. J. B. McDougall, of Casino, and Messrs. Virtue, Noble and Co., of Lismore, for riglit-out auction sale at Casino. The whole of Mr. Higinbotham's herd of 95 head, with the exception of six heifers, are entered in the A.J.H. Book, and the opportunity to acquire new blood and first-rate stock was too goou for the North Coast breed ers to miss, consequently at the sale on the 2nd inst., every breeder of note from the Tweed to the Clarence was present, and competed keenly f...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE BODALLA ESTATE. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

BODALLA ESTATE. Although the products of the Bo dalla Estate are fairly well known, especially its cheese, which has been on the market for 30 or 40 years, the extent of the operations carried on there is not generally known. We learn from the "Moruya Times": The estate carries from 2500 to 2800 head of dairy cattle. The cheese out put has averaged for years between 200 tons and 250 tons per annum, and this product is all sold through the company's store in Sussex-street. One hundred and twenty-five hands are employed on the estate, and they are paid £7550 per annum, while the city expenses make the total cash outgoing in salaries and wages .£8000 per annum. A classification of em ployees shows the following:-Man agement 2, office stafl' 2, store 4, but chers' shop 2, blacksmiths' shop 2, hotel G, chcescmaking 9, milkers GO, calf feeders 3, ploughmen and labour ers 5, carpenters 3, engineer and tin smith 2, jack-of-all-trades 1, team sters 3, gardener 1, scrubcu'ttcrs 5, firewood ge...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CATTABU—A CROSS BETWEEN JAPAN AND INDIAN CATTLE. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 24 February 1911

THE CATTABU-A CROSS BE TWEEN JAPAN AND INDIAN CATTLE. " Observer" writes :-Whilst search ing in " The Scientific American" for information of an entirely different .nature, I met with a short article under the above heading. As I have not seen any mention of the subject in any of our newspapers, a short re lerence to the article referred to may he interesting to some of your read ers. * The article begins with the fol lowing statement :-" Six years ago, Secretary Wilson, of the Department of Agriculture, found in Texas a grade oi so-called Brahma cattle, in quiring into their origin, he found that they were tne offspring of a zebu bull (or sacred cattle of India), which had been purchased from a circus and liberated in Southern Texas. Secre tary Wilson found that the Brahma cattle were remarkably free from disease, and the thriftiest cattle in all the. region ; that the dreaded Texas tick did not attack them, and that they took quite naturally to the marshe^ of the Gulf coast, and t...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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