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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE NOISELESS AGE. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 22 May 1915

THE NOISELESS AGE. Are we really approaching the Noiseless Age, when sound will- no longer 'be necessary to communicate human messages? Mr. George Ethei bert Walsh (writing in the "Associat ed Sunday Magazine"- of America) says: I was riding in the subway when two women facing each other were engaged in an animated conver sation without words. Not a sound escaped their lips; yet they were talking and smiling, using all the little suggestive shrugs of the shoul ders and raising of the eyebrows that denote intense interest in their con versation. I pondered a moment in silence, and did not grasp the key to ~he situation until one of them laugh ed and exploded with glee— "That's fine, Mabel! I could read - every word." Then it dawned upon me. They were learning lip reading; one of the latest fads, I understand, among the fashionable set. They were not deaf —far from it—they had keen ears, and could "hear" all that their neigh bors in the car said; but no one could hear them. Lip readin...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SEND YOUR MEN TO THE FRONT. A Famous Novelist's Message to Women. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 22 May 1915

SEND YOUR MEN TO THE FRONT. A Famous Novelist's Message to Women. By Flora Anna Steel. "Why should we vomen send our men to fight? Why should we run the risk of our husband, our son, our bro ther, our sweetheart, losing a leg or an arm—if not, indeed, his life?" This is a question I am constantly being asked, and as generalisations about patriotism and duty have no weight at all with those who, in them ; selves, have no sense of patriotism or duty that will respond to those chords, I. propose to set out clear commonsensical reasons why women should interest themselves in bring ing this disastrous devil's war to a speedy conclusion. Firstly.—Because though they may think they had no hand in bringing it about, they really are as much re sponsible for it as the men. That is to say, women for long years have purchased complete freedom from all responsibilities outside their own homes, by relegating them to their men-folk as the fighting animals. The women have given men a free hand as r...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER VII. What a Lover Saw. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 22 May 1915

CHAPTER VII. What a Lover Saw. About four o'clock that afternoon a good-looking young man was walk ing briskly along the road which : skirted the grounds of the Manor | House on the side farthest from the village. Here the curving road gave a steep dip, descending to a stream which ran under it, and thence ! through part of the Manor House land. Having crossed the bridge, the young man turned off the road at the entrance to a grass lane running down into the little valley, and known I as Badger Lane. This led to a wood- ! ed hollow, called Spring Dell, at the j side of which a spring of water j trrckled into a stone basin, evidently centuries old. The hollow was se cluded and sheltered by the wood, which grew thickly around its sides. Arrived at the dell, the young fel low looked around, half-expectantly, and then, as though satisfied that no one was there, turned and strolled back along the lane. His air and gait left no doubt that he was waiting for someone to keep an appointment,...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Cloak of Darkness CHAPTER VI. The Mystery of the Footprints. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 22 May 1915

fhe Cloak of Darkness By SIR WILLIAM MAGNAY, Author of "The Long Hand," "Paul Burden," "The Unknown Fourth," etc. All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER VI. The Mystery of the Footprints. "What do you think of it now?" Conway asked, when the constable had gone off to search for any further clue. "It seems to give rather a myster ious touch to the business, I must say," Guise answered; "though, of course, it may not amount to much. We know that the Countess had taken off her left-hand glove in the car riage; the ring may have been loose and dropped off in the hurry of get ting out and beating a retreat." "Yes," Conway replied doubtfully. "All the same, T don't see a clever, alert woman like the Countess allow ing a valuable ring casually to $>op off her finger." "Quite so," Guise returned. "But we must allow for her being bustled and perhaps reduced to a state of alarm by that foreign fellow. In a strongly pre-occupied, (not to say per turbed, state of mind, she would na turally not notice ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WEATHER FORECASTS WORTH THOUSANDS. Prophecies That Save Money and Lives. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 22 May 1915

WEATHER FORECASTS WORTH THOUSANDS. Prophecies That Save Money and Lives. The fact that the British and Ger man forces have skilled meteorolo gists attached to their headquarters staff is proof of how reliable a science weather forecasting has become. Commanders now know twenty-four hours ahead when to expect rain, wind or fog, and thus they can lay their plans of campaign according to the rulings of the Clerk of the Weather. But, apart from its military value, weather forecasting mow saves hundreds of pounds and many lives in other directions. The safety of ships at sea has been increased a hundred fold of recent years through the ac curacy of weather forecasts. .By means of wireless telegraphy the conditions of sea, sky and wind a thousand miles ahead are now flashed to Admirals of the Fleet and to sea captains in all parts of the world. In this way mariners can also be warn ed of their great bugbear—the sea fog. The value placed on these pre dictions can be gauged from the fact th...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER VIII. In the Night of Triumph. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 22 May 1915

CHAPTER VIII. In the Night of Triumph. The next day was one of bustle at the Manor House. Mr. Wallace, the Home Secretary, and the party from Drylaw came over to luncheon for the purpose of settling the details of that night's big meeting. The Minis ter was an alert, comfortable-looking man of fifty-five, with a keen, clean shaven face, and the certain careless ness of get-up which, affected or not, suggests a mind too full of affairs of state, or at any rate the game of poli tics, to have room for such trifles as dress or fashion. The mind is the thing in this vocation, they seem to tell you; not the tailor, mot the clothes, but the man inside them. But what the Right Honorable Ro I bert Wallace lacked in sartorial dis | tinction was amply compensated for by the immaculate and studied attire of his private secretary, Mr. Stan hope Gordon, a man whose line was never to make a mistake, but to be always absolutely correct and "just so." A most promising young politician with the certa...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Just the Difference. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 22 May 1915

Just the Difference, A woman's way is not a man's way —even if he follows her. For in stance, we often read: "A man will pay five shillings for a half-a-crown article that he wants, and a woman will pay hal£-a-crown for a five-shil ling thing that she does not want." Wilh'.lm is declared to have a huge private fortune invested in America, so that if he is ever forced to leave his little wooden hut at Potsdam, he could retire to the States and go into business. Might we suggest that he ought to succeed as a wholesale butcher. "No," said the man who was shot in the head by his friend while, they were out shooting, lost the greater part of an ear, and was scratched con siderably, "I don't mind the wounds so much, but it breaks my heart to have my head mistaken, by my most intimate friend, for a rabbit." The Footman: I wonder what makes your nose red, Mr. Bins? The Butler: Globing with conscious pride, young ma--, because it's never poked into othei people's business.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MR. H. G. WELLS ON "SCIENTIFIC WAR." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 22 May 1915

MR. H. G. WELLS ON "SCIENTIFIC WAR." Mr. H. G. Wells, in the course of an article, says— "No doubt much ingenuity will stand between the Allies and the cap ture of Essen, which is the real heart of the new Germany we fight. But Creusot-Schneider, Armstrongs, Vil liers-Maxim, are on their mettle, and the Allies are no longer lax. They are fighting for their lives now, with better brains and better men than Germany. The Germans began, and the Allies will end, at their maximum of destructive efficiency. Strange dragons and wonderful beasts of steel will battle in Westphalia before the end, but the end will be the down fall of Essen and Kruppism for ever. "Upon the sea the warnings of the prophets have also been confirmed. The great ironclad, though still ne cessary for the control of the ocean, is no longer the unchallenged mistress of the seas. There is no perfect com mand of the seas any more. The mine and the submarine, elusive and unavoidable, have made the narrow waters unsafe eve...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RAZOR REASONING. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 22 May 1915

RAZOR REASONING. A razor, either safety or old style, will shave better if the stropping is done some time before the shave is taken; say about ten minutes. Every one knows that a razor edge, looked at through a microscope, appears like a saw with many jagged teeth. It has these teeth, no matter how sharp it is. Npw, as the razor is stropped some of these teeth "are broken off and others are merely bent; so the last stroke of the strop, even though it be an even-numbered one, will bend some of the small teeth to one side. If a little time elapses, however, these will bend back into position. Another peculiar thing about a razor that is widely known is that if it is given a long rest of two or three i mor.ths it will seem to get young again and will put up a good shave. This is probably caused by the teeth on the edge rusting off. No matter how clean you rub a razor after shaving, small particles of water re main between the teeth. As the edges of the teeth are the points ex posed to...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 22 May 1915

A'LONG-SERVICE TRAMWAY OFFICER MR. CHARLES ROCK 42 Gladen Street, East Brunswick, for 33 years in the Melbourne Tramway Company, writes this letter (2/4/12), which is of special interest-to all. Rail way and Tramway men. to CLEMENTS TOKlipDr "In December, 1011,1 caughft cold and serious pleurisy. For three days my, temperature was 104 degrees. My life was des paired of, bat thr ough taking the doctor's advice I live to-day, he advised my wife to get Clements Tonic, as ' THERE ¥/AS;iIFE IN THAf ^EDI€INE7 Tihey were the truest words he ever uttered, and I would have been dead only for that grandmedi cina. My wife paid 2/3 for the small bottles, had she paid £40 she would have had good value. 1 have seen a lot of letters about CLEMENTS TONIC in books and papers, but what Iiind fault with is that every writer has utterly failed to give the proper value of that medicine. (Signed) CHARLES ROCK.** A Cairns resident writes: "A line shewing the result of taking Clements Tonic. 12 months ago ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LAYING A GHOST. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 22 May 1915

LAYING A GHOST. I "Heigho! Next week will be Eas ter, and not a "soul has taken com passion on a lonely bachelor. Alas! for the callousness of the world." i made the above remark to my pipe, as I sat having a quiet smoke after breakfast on a certain wild March morning. It would be the first vacation I had spent in town since my call to the Bar, some three or four years before. The prospect was far from pleasant, for, according to the weather-wise folk, we were to have a wet Easter, and that, combined with the know ledge that I should be the only soli tary wretch in chambers on Easter Monday, made me feel inclined to anathematise persons and things in general, and I began to vent my spleen on the fire by savagely stir ring it,, when a knock at the door caused me to desist. The housekeep er entered with a letter. Joy! Here was hope at last. I recognised the handwriting at once; it was from Tom Danville, an old college chum. Hasti ly opening it I read— Dear Fred,—Cissie and I want you ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Doughty Exploit. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 29 May 1915

A Doughty Exploit. A graphic description of how avia tors fight is provided by the story of M. Gilbert, the famous French avia tor. who won. the Gross o£ the Le gion of Honor. It was above Amiens, after returning from a reconnais sance, that Gilbert, with a lieutenant observer, saw a German, flying ma chine. He immediately went in pur suit, and was soon in the position to open fire. "The enemy," he says, "had not heard us, for, after rising nearly 2000ft. above him, I cut off spark ready to swoop down on him. The lieutenant fired the first shot at a distance of only thirty or forty feet, and shot the German through the neck. The German turned around aghast, but before he could do any thing my observer had fired again, while I kept my machine almost mo tionless over the hostile aeroplane. The bullet pierced the steel plate and passed clean through the heart of the observer, who fell back in hi* seat."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FROM THE FIRING LINE. Died As He Lived. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 29 May 1915

FROM THE FIRING LINE. Died As He Lived. Touching and impressive is the story of how Lieutenant L. R. Hatch, 2nd Royal Irish Fusiliers, died. "Our trenches," says a brother officer in a letter to Hatch's parents, "were about 20 yards from the enemy's, and your son vras hit in the shoulder at 8.1& in the morning. His platoon made him as comfortable as possible with their skin mats, and gave him hot coffee on his stool. At 11.15 we were fired on very heavily by new German how itzers. After the first burst I called out to him to see if they were all right. Under his instructions the men called back, 'All right.' I did not even know he was wounded. The next burst put a shell right in _th© trench. • "Some of the men had got along near him to try to move him, at great risk, just before, but he ordered them back, and he was alone with one man, Private , when the next rounds commenced. Both must have been billed instantaneously. The men or dered back realise he saved their lives. He ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW JELLICOE KEEPS FIT. The Admiral and the "Ki-Boy." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 29 May 1915

HOW JELL1C0E KEEPS FIT. The Admiral and the "Ki-Boy." By practising "catches" and indul | ging in vigorous running around the ; deck, Admiral Jellicoe keeps himself j in the "pink of condition," according to an interesting letter from a gun l ner on board the Iron Duke, the Ad miral's flagship. He says:— ■ With one of the a&mirals he goes on deck, and Jellicoe throws the ball to his admiral, and he in turn throws it back. When in need of more strenuous exercise (adds the gunner), Jellicoe runs around the deck a time or two, until he has had enough. He has the spirits of a schoolboy, and he is al ways good-humored and keen. We all like him. A humorous incident of life aboard the flagship is related by the gunner as follows:— We were out one dark and cold 1 night. It is on such nights that hot I coffee is served to the men on the • night watches. The coffee is called "ki," and is carried around by the "ki-boy." When walking along the deck, the "ki-boy" thought he saw one of th...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XI. Rolt Arrives. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 29 May 1915

CHAPTER XI. Rolt Arrives. About noon next day a dog-cart drove up to the Manor House, and from it alighted the celebrated Mr. Rolt, the Commissioner and Direc tor of the detective department at the Home Office, and a subordinate, Detective-Inspector Shrewton. Rolt, with his straight; fair hair, rather boyish face, slight figure and pecu liarly diffident manner, made a strong contrast to his keen-eyed, muscular, resolute-looking compan ion. Doubtless, George and Derman Conway, who came out to receive them, were struck by. this singular and at the same time significant dis parity. After a few preliminary remarks, it was arranged that Derman should take off Inspector Shrewton to view the places connected with the tra gedy, while Rolt had an interview at once with his brother. As George ushered Rol't into his' study the spaniel, which had been , lying before the fire, jumped up at his master after the manner of dogs. "Down, Sport, will you! Here,. come out," Conway said, opening the Fre...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 29 May 1915

For Bronchial Coagha la 63 v Woods Great Peppermint Cure. »■*£, i

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER X. In the Lantern Light. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 29 May 1915

CHAPTER X. In the Lantern Light. On receiving the police message •after the meeting, Ueorge Conway at once made his way to Mr. Wallace and told him the news. "This is a terrible business," the minister said. "Where is the man who brought the information?" Conway beckoned to the inspector, who had kept near. "You say the body of the missing lady, Countess Mornay, has been found at Temple Westford?" Mr. Wal lace asked anxiously. "Yes, sir. A message was sent to the station here at about nine-thirty this evening stating the body had' been found at Westford and asking for an officer to go over. The super intendent-has gone himself, sir, with a detective and a constable. Before leaving, he instructed me to come on here and inform Mr. Conway at the close of the meeting." "But where," Conway demanded, "has the body been found?" "That we don't know, sir—at least, over here. The man who brought the message knew no more than it had been discovered at Westford. The constable stationed there ha...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 29 May 1915

For children's hacking; cough at; night, , Woods' Great peppermint (Jure, Is 6d TOE PARIi IS YOUR LSVING~—~~ fHEREFORE it will pay you to sow the best Seeds ob tainable.. You can get them from us, and they cost no more than those you have been using, but your bank ; account will tell a tale at the end of the season. Larger yields—better prices greater profits—are only a few of the advantages to be derived when you buy your Seeds from GORDON BEOS.,— BALLARAT'S BIG SEED STORE, ARMSTRONG STREET. 11. PALMER i CO. Chemists and Druggists, 39 LYDIARD STREET, Ballarat. Prescriptions accurately dispensed and forwarded to any part o£ the State. Daily applications of Palmer's Ger man Corn Solvent will soon give relief to the most troublesome corns, whethe; hard or soft. Quite painless. In bottles, Is. By post, Is. Id. Palmer's Pink Powders.: For children, befor6, during, or after the period of teething. They quickly relieve feverishness, fretfulness, and constipation, and are perfectly harm le...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 29 May 1915

For Bronchial Coaebs, take Wood?'Great Peppermint Care, la 6d.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Cloak of Darkness CHAPTER IX. The Lovers' Letter-Box. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 29 May 1915

By SIR WILLIAM MAGNAY, Author of "The Long Hand," "Paul Burden," "The Unknown Fourth," etc. Published by arrangement with Ward, Lock & Co. Ltd., London & Melb. All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER IX. The Lovers' Letter-B°x. Hubert Vaynor had spent the day rather aimlessly, seeing that with a lover's prodigality of time his chief desire was for it to pass quickly and bring the hour when he might expect to find in their secret letter-box a scribbled line from Violet Conway, telling him when next he was to have the joy of one of thei. delicious sto len meetings. It Y/as imperative that they sliould mpet secretly, since Marion Conway s Sharp eves had some time before de tected signs of affection between the two, and had decidedly put her foot down upon the idea of anything so foolish. Not that Hubert Vaynor wa.s by any means what would be looked upon as an ineligible match. He was the only son of his father, and Col'onel Vaynor was reputed to be quite well off. He possessed a s...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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