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Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, T... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 719 items from Australian Children's Newspaper, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

nun?,, H. H:, FEOUDE, SURGEON DENTIST, 378 GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY, and 328 DARLING ST., BALMAIN. High-Class Dentistry at Moderate Fees. Bridge, Crown, and Pivot inserted, Cold Fillings, etc. The Regulation Ol Children's Teeth a Speci- ality. (¡as Administered Haily, 7s. t>d. Special Quotations for lar^e amount of Work.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Out=door Sports. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

OuUdoor Sports. [BY "OBSERVER."] [The Sports Editor will be glad to receive notes of school sports for inclusion in this column, and is prepared to answer any questions concerning the game of cricket.] [NTERCOLONÏAL FIXTURES. December 15, 16, 18, and 19-New South Wales v. South Australia, at Adelaide. December 23, 26, 27, and 2S-Victoria v. New South Wales, at Melbourne. December 30, January 1, 2, and 5 - Victoria v. South Australia, at Mel- bourne.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

For Whoop^Coughs andk Chest Colds, RQW'S EMBROCATION.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

BOVRIL!! The most Nourishing: and Valuable LIQUID FOOD erer discovered. One teaspoonful makes a delicious cup of Beef Tea. Ordinary Beef Tea is a stimulant only. BOVRIL is BEEF in Solution ; FOOD as well aa Stimulant. BOVRIL is prescribed by Medical men all over the world. BOVRIL is sold in all the respectable hotels in London. BOVRIL is dispensed in all the Hospitals, and BOVRIL is sold at 150,000 shops in Great Britain. BOVRIL surpasses everything in maintaining strength and building up weak consti- tutions. RA.IffKIlKr Sc Go. Bovril Representatives, 3^ vww S^EET SYDNEY

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FOREIGN NEWS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

THE Americans are still fighting against the rebel Filipinos. A few days since 1200 Filipino troops were defeated at San Jacinto. There were 300 casualties on the side of the rebels, but only 19 amongst the Americans. NEWS is just to hand that the American cruiser Charleston struck on an unchartered rock off the coast of Luzon and sank, though her crew of 30h* were saved and rescued (after being on shore for a week) by the warship Oregon. [t was the Charleston which, during the American-Spanish War last year, was sent to take the Spanish island of Guam. It is said that when the vessel anchored off the island and fired a shot from her cannon the Spanish Governor came out in a boat to apologise for not returning their salute, because he was shorl of powder! Hr had not heard of the war.] ONE very pleasant incident of the present war is the evidence of friendship between Portugal and England. THE Emperor of Germany is visiting his grandmother, the Queen of England. His visit at the pres...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Boer War. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

The Boer War. THE war now raging in South Africa is not correctly described as a Transvaal war. It is a Boer war. The question at issue is, practically, shall the British or the Boer be the dominant power in South Africa 1 The Orange Free State has joined with the Transvaal to invade Natal on the e ist and Oape Colony in the north-east and south. It is wrong to suppose that the refusal of the Boers to grant the franchise to the Uitlanders is the sole cause of the war. Equally wrong is it to suppose that the bi uta! conduct of the Boers towards certain British subjects is the direct cause of war. These are only incidents which mark the real underlying cause. The Boers have for a long time been secretly preparing to dispute Britain's supremacy in South Africa. Many leading Englishmen failed to realise that this was the real issue till the announcement was made at the be- ginning of this month (after the war had begun) that the Boers had imported during the past few years as many as 15...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

WHY PAY FOR A WATCH ? CAN YOU READ THIS? I A I S*L*D I S*LV*R 1 W*T*H | I | G**N j *F I I j GU*SS I R*G*T I & I B*Y | A | CH**N In order to introduce our Business into every Household in Australia, we undertake and gua- rantee to give away one of our World-famed £2 10s. Solid Silver Keyless Hunter Watches, LADY'S or GENTLEMAN'S, to every reader who sends the Correct Reading of the above Puzzle. CONDITIONS.-That your answer to the Puzzle is correct, and that you further undertake, if correct, to purchase one of our Solid Silver Single or Double chains. Send Stamped Addressed Envelope for Reply. ADDRESS-THE MANAGER The GLOBE WATCH COMPANY, Ltd., 105 PITT-STREET, SYDNEY

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

SPECIAL NOTICE. The receipt of your copy in a coloured wrapper is an intimation that your subscription has expired. If you wish to renew it, kindly send Postal Note or Stamps at once. The receipt of your copy in a white wrapper after that is an acknowledg. ment of the remittance.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEWS OF THE EMPIRE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

THE most important items of " News of the Empire " during the past month have been the Boet War and the settlement of the Samoa difficulty. THE Samoan War was described in a former issue. Now Britain and Germany have arranged to leave the islands of Savii and Upolu (Samoa) to Germany, Tutuila (to America), whilst England acquires Choiseul and Ysabel in the Solomon Group, the Friendly Islands (south of Samoa), and Savage Island or Niue east of the sime group. At the same time the neutral territory in the Niger territory (Africa) has been ceded to England, whilst Germany renounced all claim over Zanzibar. THE Friendly (or Tonga) Islands thus acquired by Britain are at present ruled by the native king, an enlightened Christian ruler, who has a parliament of two houses. They consist of three groups of islands, with a total area of 385 square miles and a population of about 23,000. Tongatabu is a better port than Apia in Samoa. British traders have already most of the commerce in their o...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GEOGRAPHICAL FACTS & FANCIES CERAM. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

(ER AM. BY GEO. COLLINGRIDGE       Member of the Council of the Royal Geographical Society of Australasia. IT lhs occurred to me that readers of the CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER, both   young and old---for there are many grown-up boys and girls who take delight in reading the C.N.---may like to hear something about the island of Ceram, which was visited the other day by such a terrible earthquake that 4,000 of its inhabitants are said to have perished and 500 to have suffered in- juries. Australians ought to know more than they do about all the beautiful islands that are, so to speak, within cooee of their shores. Ceram, like most of the islands to the north of Australia, is very little known, and its interior and lofty plateaux have never been explored, although the island was first visited by Europeans as far hack as the year 1511. This was when a Portuguese fleet of three small vessels, under the command of D'Abreu, sailed into the rece...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHATTER PAGE EDITOR'S NOTE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

^CHATTER j EDITOR'S NOTE. We want to encourage our little friends to _ end us short, chatty letters on matters of general interest. Every month we will print a page of the best, and at the end of the year give a prize for the best letter sent in. The points on which it will gain a place will be composition and subject. Any letters not for publication should be headed PRIVATE. Dear Editor,-This is the first time I have written to you. I think your paper is a very interesting one for such a price as a penny. Every school child should possess one. I wonder have you ever been for a trip to the Clarence River ? It i< a very nice river, wide and deep, and nt ver goes dry in the summer time. The head of it is very pretty ; there are lots of people often go for picnics, but lately7 the sand is coming down the river, and the waves of the sea wash the sand both ways, so there is formed a kind of a sand spit. There are many islands in the Clarence. I walk about two miles to Harwood ...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

The Cheapest House For VIOLINS, BANJOS, MANDOLINS, AUTOHARPS, &c. MUSIC, SONGS, WALTZES, at ls. 9d. each. WHY l'A Y MORE? VIOLIN STRINGS, Best in the World, at 3d. and 5d. At ALBERT'S in King Street. Others charge Double. ALBERT & SON, KING STREET. Bf) U"' TANCENTSTEEL REEDS! ALBERTS PATENT BOOMERANG, the King of Mouth Organs. Sweet, Mellow Tonc>, and almost indestructible. Retail Price, 2s. 6d. and ls. 6d. Trade Supplied. NOTICE.-'Tis on one of these High-class BOOMERANGS that WALTER ORMOND won the Australian Cham pionship, thc Gold Medal, and a purse of sovereigns on May 6th, 1899, at the «olden Gate Club, before the referees and an audience of two thousand, 25s. up. PHONOGRAPHS, 25s. up. Each Phonograph, from 25s. up to 10 Guineas, includes, free of extra charge, tbs following : THE MACHINE itself ^ PEDESTAL and OAK COVER 1 HORN and REPRODUCER and J RECORDS Extra Records, 2s. 6d. and 5s. each. Reduction on quantities. THREEPENNY-IN-THE-SLOT GRAPHOPHONES, Besl k...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Science. The Planets. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

Science. Thc Planets. By "GOSSIP." j n the last number of the CHILDRENS' NEWSPAPER there was a reply to " R.B.D." that interested me very much. It was about the planet "Vulcan.'" I think the letter is from a boy eleven years of age, but it may be from a girl : I'm not sure. Here's the letter, leaving out the name and address, Sin. -We (Third Class) were reading some time back in the new Fourth Reader about the Planet.-. After the reading lesson was over our teacher read to as from a physical geography about another planet called "Vulcan." It was discovered in the year 1859 by a French observer as a telescopic planet. Its position being between Mercury and the sun. Please tell me which book is correct. I Remain yours truly, " R.B.D." The editor said in " Answers " that I would reply to it. But he replied to it very well indeed, for nobody is very sure whether there is a planeo of that name or not. What startled me was the idea of the " New Australian School Reader" being wrong. If it...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Man of the Moment. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

Jl Wan of th<t Moment PAUL KRUGER. T N view of the great interest now being manifested in the war in South Africa I propose to substi- tute for my cutomary " Empire Builder " sketch a brief outline of one of the men of the moment The dominant personality amongst the South African Boers is, without doubt, "Oom Paul'' (r.e., Uncle Paul), as he is affectionately called by his people. A typical Boer, he is the Africander's ideal of a ruler and statesman ; whilst to the British Uitlander he is the very incarnation of faithlessness and tyranny. The real Paul Kruger is neither the one person nor the other. According to his own nar- row views he is a valiant and patriotic upholder of Boer rights, a strong man, mentally as well as physically. And, however much we may despise many of his despic able traits of character, wTe must admit that he is a truly great man-a Cromwell on a lowTer plane -without the genius and the acute moral force of England's great Protector ; but with the s...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. All letters to the Hil ¡tor mil be replied to as far as possible a mia- this heading. J.H.R., (Muswellbrook.) -(1) It began ni July and ends this nu tnt li, December, being a holiday month, when " children cease from troubling and teachers are at rest.'" (2) We do not ; but watch the papers. EDA L. BUNNAN. -Well, you write and tell us what there is. MARV R. (Bedellucks). -Yours is cer 'tainly a model school, in our opinion, when 2ô per cent, of the scholars are subscribers to the C. X. We hope you will get the rain you need. tiiLSIE ( . -About tho goat called venus -Sydney folks are prejudiced against goats. 1 had a nice little house at Woollahra once, and the front garden was a dream of beauty-where twinkly cosmeas fluttered in the breeze and giant sunflowers turned their unwinking eye to the sun. There were rows of balsams and a sweet-pea vine that hung like jewelled screen in Titania's bower. All round was an iron railing, and a cunning gate that shut w...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
QUESTION COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 November 1899

QUZSTION COLUMN. Examination Questions will be given III eac i month's CHILDREN'S NEWSPAIMiR. Answers to obese question; mav be supplie i by any children in the re pective classes, aud marks will be II warde I each mo ith for correct answers. At tlw end of eich half - year- June and December valuab e prize - will be given to the six pupils who attain t'ie highest number of marks in each class. For each correct answer to a question ten mai k will be awarded. If only one i o rivet answer is sent in each month, it may win a prize. Ask your pare its to certify on your answers that you are in the class in which you are romp ting. Do not forget to sign your nam? ami Write address on your auswers. Anonymous answers ..arnot be ere lited with m irks. Answers must reach me within thirty days of the publication of the questions but if you have them ready. 1 will be glad to have them sooner, so that I may ii >t lie rushed at the la^t moment. If your answers fill more than one page, place von...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MAT. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

MAT. IKE Pip, in " Great Expectations," Mat was brought up by hand, and for the same reason, his mother having died on the day of his birth. He first saw the light on a bright morning in spring, many years ago. It was Short who found him standing beside the body of his dead mothe r with a wistful look in his beautiful dark eyes, which said, as plainly as a look could say, " Where am I, and what am I expected to do '! " As he stood there, with his chestnut coat re- flecting the gloiy of the rising sun, he was a perfect model of graceful equine beauty, or, as Short, with laconic brevity, expressed it, a " right 'un." j¡ ^jShort was a pupil of mine, a boy about 12 years old, and it is to him that Mat AN EMU'S NEST. owesjhîs existence, for Short made the task of rearing him the main purpose of his life. Liberally fed upon fresh milk, green barley, cracked maize, and what- ever his little guardian thought would please him, the motherless foal throve, in spite of his bereavement, and at s...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OUR YOUNG PEOPLE AS MANUAL WORKERS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

OUR YOUNG PEOPLE AS MANUAL WORKERS. Some time ago we asked in the Question Column for a description of something our competitors had made with their hands. Many interest- ing answers were received, and as others may get hints from the essays sent in, we print herewith a few of the best of them : How I MADE A SILKWIXDER. The construction of a silk winder is very simple, and as it is essential to .every minor silk grower it is a well known structure. It is wholly composed of rive pieces of wood, two of which must run perpendicularly, so that you may insert two round bars in each end and a handle in the middle. The round bars at each end and the perpendicular pieces then revolve on the handle. Pro- cess of manufacture : Get five pieces of wood (cedar if possible) and cut two of them Hin. long (which I will call A. and B. ). Then smooth them over with a knife, and make them round as well as smooth, so that the silk may not catch on them. Then make two of the 14in. bars (which I will cal...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
How I MADE A HAT RACK [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

How I MADE A HAT RACK I have done very little work with my hands which would he worth relating, but nevertheless I shall try to explain now I built a hat-rack. The school w hich I attend had no hat rack provided, and for the past twelve months we have heen placing our hats on a vacant form just outside the door. The form is now in use, so my teacher asked me if I would endeavour to make a rack, which I did in the following manner : I got two pieces of deal hoard about 6ft. in length respectively, and about 4in. in width, and with an auger I bored eight holes in each of the pieces, then with a brace and bit I made two holes, one at each end for a screw to pass through, which was to attach it to the « all of the school. The next operation was making the pegs which was more difficult. I split into 16 pieces a board, and after planing the pieces and tapering them, I inserted them in the holes. When finished 1 took it to school, and fastened both pieces to the wall. I then purchased some...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW I MADE MADAME'S PUDDING. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 January 1900

How I MADE MADAME'S PUDDING. Cost about 7d.-Ingredients: 4 ounces of suet, 3 ounces of moist sugar, one pound of apples, 6 ounces of bread crumbs, 3 ounces of currants and 1 egg. Chop the suet finely, mix it with the currants, sugar and bread crumbs ; then add the apples, well stewed, mix to- gether, and then stir in the egg, well beaten. Put into a greased pie-dish and bake in a good oven for one hour. Turn on to a hot dish and sift a little sugar over, and serve. A.L.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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