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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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PECULIAR DEATH OF A BOY. PLAYING HIDE AND SEEK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

PECULIAR DEATH OF A BOY.       PLAYING HIDE AND SEEK. Several boys were playing hide and seek in Nicholson-street, North Carlton, Melbourne, on Thursday evening, and one of their number, Francis Collins, aged nine years, son of Mr. Denis Collins, sorter at the General Post Office, after going away to hide, could not be found by his playmates. After searching unsuccess- fully for him, the boys went to his home in Sta- tion-street, and told his father that they could not find him. For close on two hours Mr. Collins went looking around the neighborhood to see if he could find any trace of his son, and even- tually, at 11.20 p.m., he found his body, lying face downwards on an enclosed vacant piece of ground off Nicholson-street. It appeared that he had fallen, and that his forehead had come in contact with a large stone, but his arms were extended, and there was only a very slight bruise on the forehead, strongly indicating that he had not met a vi...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OUTRAGE ON A BRITISH VESSEL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

OUTRAGE ON A BRITISH VESSEL.   An attempt has been made at Pensacola to set on fire and blow up the British steamship Cayo Largo, which was loading cotton there, at the end of November. Ten thousand bales had been taken on board, when a seaman discovered that match-heads had been strewn about the hold, as well as over 20 cannon crackers charged with dynamite. Matches were also found jammed be- tween the cotton bales, with their heads pro- truding in such a way that the least friction would ignite them.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
American Battleship. MOST POWERFUL YET DESIGNED. DONE BY MAJORITY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

American Battleship. MOST POWERFUL YET DESIGNED. DONE BY MAJORITY. The illustration shows the most powerful   battleship ever designed in naval warfare. It   is American. The term powerful is used in its   broadest sense as applying both to offensive   and defensive qualities, and those other sub-   sidiary, but scarcely less valuable, elements of   speed, radius of action, and habitability.   The Naval Board of Construction, by whom the   new battleship herewith illustrated was de-   signed, is composed of five Chiefs of Bureaus,   the Bureaus being those of Construction, Ord- nanc, Engineering, Supplies, and Intelligence. The three members of the board represent- ing the technical bureaus are strongly unani- mous in recommending that the new battleships be constructed upon the plans herewith pre- sented, the Chiefs of the Bureaus of Supplies and &am...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THAT SUBMARINE MARVEL. AMERICA'S MASTERPIECE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THAT SUBMARINE MARVEL.   AMERICA'S MASTERPIECE. The achievement of the Holland submarine torpedo-boat Fulton, which remained under water in Long Island Sound for fifteen hours, has been hailed by the American press in the most amazing headlines, one of them being, "Jules Vernes' Nautilus Eclipsed." What has really been demonstrated, however, is that the Fulton possesses only one of the many quali- fications which all submarine vessels must pos- sess if they are to be of any practical value whatever. For fifteen hours the boat lay at the bottom of Peconic Bay, near New York, without any com- munication with the rest of the world, and thus, for the first time in the history of submarine navigation, it has been proved that men can breathe and work unhindered deep down in the ocean for a comparatively long time. The officers and crew enjoyed perfect comfort, and, it is said, did not have to use any of the compressed air. The officers say that they could have lived under wat...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Very "High" Explosive. AN EXTRAORDINARY FORMULA. THE INVENTOR COMMITTED ON THE CHARGE OF IMPOSITION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

Very '"High" Explosive.   AN EXTRAORDINARY FORMULA. —*— THE INVENTOR COMMITTED ON THE CHARGE OF IMPOSITION. A middle-aged man named Andrew-Byron, ap- parently an "enthusiast" of the most aggressive type, appeared at the City Court, Melbourne, the other day to answer two charges of obtaining money under false pretences from one Alexander Reid Baird. Mr. Coldham, who appeared for Baird, stated that the parties first met in Sydney in Septem- ber, 1900, when Byron brought under his client's notice a new "explosive," which, he said, he in- tended to call after himself. It was to furnish motive power to engines, inter alia, and would prove to be one of the most marvellous inven- tions of this or any other age. After some ne- gotiation, Baird agreed to encourage science in general, and the inventor of "Byron- ite" in particular, by purchasing one fourth interest in the new "motive power," which, Byron said, was obtained in a wonderful way. As a matter of fact, when the secret ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MINING ACCIDENT IN AMERICA. EIGHT OFFICIALS LOSE THEIR LIVES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

MINING ACCIDENT IN AMERICA.   EIGHT OFFICIALS LOSE THEIR   LIVES. A despatch from Bluefields, West Virginia, on Nov. 23, stated that at 11 o'clock that morning eight mining officials entered the West and South west Virginia Improvement Company's collieries for the purpose of examining the situation in regard to the recent explosion and fire in the Baby mine, and that they had not been heard of up to midnight. A rescue party started out at 6 o'clock the same evening, but came back in 45 minutes, black damp making entrance to the mine for any dis- tance impossible. One member of the rescue party was overcome by the gas. The fire in the Baby mine is burning fiercely. According to a later telegram from Bluefields, all hope of rescuing the eight officials who are in the Baby mine had been abandoned.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
VALUABLE COLLECTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

VALUABLES COLLECTIONS. The anthropological collections at Yale Uni-   versity are stated to comprise from 15,000 to   20,000 specimens, chiefly archaeological, and they   represent geographically 36 states and territories,   Hawaii, and the Philippines, besides 40 foreign countries. More than 3000 antiquities are from   Central America, including 63 gold ornaments   from "Chiriqui. There are over 1000 pieces of   Missouri pottery. Recent additions represent the   Quarternary and cave deposits of Western Eu-   rope, the Swiss Lake Dwellings, and the shell   heaps and dolmens of Scandinavia. Physical an-   thropology is illustrated by several hundred   skulls, mostly from Pacific Islands.    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BRITISH V. FOREIGN METHODS. A REVOLUTION IN STEEL MAKING. ELECTRIC POWER FOR MIDDLESBROUGH WORKS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

BRITISH V. FOREIGN METHODS. A REVOLUTION IN STEEL MAKING.   ELECTRIC POWER FOR MIDDLES-   BROUGH WORKS.     British manufacturing methods are often com-   pared to the disadvantage of the home system.   It is therefore very proper that the other side of   the question should sometimes be presented.   An important departure from the older methods   of working, for instance, is just now being de-   veloped at Messrs. Bolckow, Vaughan, and Co.'s   huge Cleveland steel works at Middlesbrough,   where electric motive power is, as far as possible,   being substituted for steam.   Several contracts have already been completed   to connection with the extensive alterations which   are being made, but all the work will not be   completed till some time next year. &nb...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"WE SHALL DIE TOGETHER." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

    "WE SHALL DIE TOGETHER."   After being married 10 years and once parted, a Leeds man, named Longley, and his wife decid- ed the other day to part a second time. This arrangement was come to in an apparent- ly amicable way, and the woman was preparing to leave the house when her husband inquired where she was going. "I don't know," she replied. "If you won't stay with me you shan't go anywhere else," rejoined the man, and put- ting his arm round her neck he suddenly pro- duced a razor and cut her throat. "There," he went on, "We have lived to- gether, and we shall die together." Whereupon he killed himself with the same   weapon. "Murder and felo de se," was the verdict at the inquest.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Interesting and Curious. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

Interesting and Curious. A man has just died in America, having been born in 1782! Affairs at Colon are for the moment at a full- stop. A clergyman's wife at Birmingham has been suggesting that a band of lady curates might be a good idea. A proposal is to be made in America for utilising the Philippines as a penal colony for Anarchists. The Mansion House Fund for the National Memorial now amounts to £181,000. A skyscraper in America is to be 125 stories high! The "New York Sun" regards the pro- jected London skyscraper as a new bond uniting the Anglo-Saxon race. At the French Academy prizes were given not only to literary people, but to persons dis- tinguished for deeds of goodness and devotion during the year. Twelve fiery untamed wild horses—the breed discovered 20 years ago in the sandy desert of Central Asia—have just reached the Duke of Bedford's park at Woburn. At a sale in London the other day a set of sculptor's tools with which Sir Edwin Landseer modelled the lions in Trafa...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
An Exhibition of Tact and Patience. THE MILITARY GOVERNOR'S DAILY LEVEE AT PRETORIA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

An Exhibition of Tact and Patience. THE MILITARY GOVERNOR'S DAILY LEVEE AT PRETORIA. General Sir John Maxwell has proved a most popular Governor of Pretoria. He has carried out his duties with the utmost tact and resource, and it is doubtful if there is a single officer of whom the Dutch have gained a higher opinion. One of the most interesting scenes in Pre- toria is found in a visit to the Governor's morning levee. There he receives old women, young maidens, elderly spinsters, and anxious mothers, and with a kind word dispels their false illu- sions, encourages their hopes, and sends them away charmed with the courteous interview which they have received.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TRULY IRISH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

TRULY IRISH.   Irish Chambermaid (indignantly to gay Lo-     thario who has tried to snatch a kiss and been   foiled): "YE DARE! IF IT WASN'T FOR   SOILEN' ME HANDS WID YE, I'D KICK YE     DOWNSTAIRS." —"Punch."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DOUBLE FLOWERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

  DOUBLE FLOWERS.   In two plants tending to form double flowers,   M. Marin Molliard has found that the roots were   being attacked by parasitic fungi. He thinks   the parasites may have caused the changes in   the flowers, and that this discovery may prove   important in practical horticulture.   How many people are aware of the fact that John Rolands is one of the greatest explorers of his generation? John Rolands is none other than Sir H. M. Stanley, the hero of "Darkest Africa," who prefers this latter name to that by which he was originally known.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"XMAS RAYS." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

"XMAS RAYS." This horrible vision presented itself to a small boy who ate a whole Christmas pudding. Supposing it was announced that Mr. Henry Brodribb and Mrs. E. A. Warden intended to give performances of "Macbeth" for three weeks only in London, who would recognise in these   two names, Sir Henry Irving and Miss Ellen   Terry?

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WEEK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE WEEK. "There is," somewhat awkwardly says the cable, "considerable difficulty in obtaining a gentleman for the position." The posi- tion is that of Governor of New South Wales, and the difficulty is said to come   from the miserably inadequate salary,   £5000 a year, which is offered. Now, ad-   mittedly it would be shabby and fool- ish for us to fix the salary at £5000 and then expect a £10,000 a year gen- tleman to accept the post. We cer- tainly do want a gentleman to be appointed. So far the Colonial Office justly construes our expectations. But we have de- cided that a £5000 a year gentleman will fully meet our requirements. We have agreed that the salary is handsome remuneration for the dimin- ished duties of the post. There really seems on the part of the Colo- nial Office to be an extravagant es- timate of the wealth or the generosity of Australia. Surely a Governor of an Austra- lian State is not badly paid when he gets as much sal...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The World's News. A RECORD OP NOTABLE EVENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

The World's News. A RECORD OF NOTABLE EVENTS. Those who read "The Daily Telegraph" every morning and "The World's News" at the week end will not miss anything that is worth knowing.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A PROTEST—TINT! [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A PROTEST—TINT!   'Twas the voice of the hard-up, I heard him remark— "They have painted me seat where I sleeps in the Park! A feller off color's a mis'rable cuss,   But a bloke colored off is a bloomin' sight   wuss. JIMMY.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NIGHT ON THE ROOF. PENTONVILLE PRISONER DEFIES THE WARDERS. "MORAL SUASION" A FAILURE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

NIGHT ON THE ROOF. PENTONVILLE PRISONER DEFIES THE WARDERS. "MORAL SUASION" A FAILURE. The central figure of interest to a large section of London citizens when the last mail left London was a gentleman who only recently was sentenced in an every-day sort of way to an every-day sort of sentence of three months' imprisonment, with hard lalbor, for an assault upon the police. Mr. Daniel Tagnell, ex-South African veteran, ex- tramp, might have committed fifty assaults upon fifty policemen, and yet never have gained one tithe of the world-wide celebrity attained by the simple expedient of climbing to the roof of Pen- tonville Prison, and staying there. A little of the vanity which waits upon unexpected distinc- tion affects Mr. Tagnell, and it is at present the strongest sentiment which just now influences him, rising dominant over the influences of hun- ger, cold, and sickness. AN OBJECT OP SOLICITUDE. From the moment that he climbed the water- spout, just before breakfast on Thursday ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PROVERBS IMPROVED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

PROVERBS IMPROVED.   "A bird in the hand is worth" two dead birds from a cronk jockey. "Those who live in glass houses" shouldn't complain if the neighbors see through them. "Virtue has it's own reward," but villainy pays a big dividend. Half-an-hour's loaf is better than no bed. "To err is human," but to be found out is a social sin, which, under present circumstances, must be expiated. JIMMY.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE COST OF CHRISTMAS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE COST OP CHRISTMAS. Does it ever occur to you that the cost of keep-   ing Christmas is a very considerable item? Not so   much in presents or good cheer, but in holidays.   Over four and a quarter millions are paid each   day in wages in Great Britain. Three days' holi-   day, therefore, means nearly 13 millions loss in   national earnings. This amount of money would   be sufficient to run a country like Holland or Nor-   way and Sweden for an entire year.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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