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Title: Bowral Free Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 18,602 items from Bowral Free Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HOW PAGANINI COURTED. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

HOW PAGANINI COURTED. Hero is a love story of howPnganini told tlio talo of hiB love to the lady who afterwards ■became his wife. There chanced to be a lady at Court who won Paganni's warmest admiration. To Bpcak liifi passion would have been inadvis able, and Paganni had, therefore, recourse to his violin. He announced that he would produce at Court a new composi tion known as tho " Love Scone." The lady to be interested was, of course, present on that occasion. Faganini appeared with an instrument of only two strings, the first and tho fourth. One of these ho explained, would express the feeling of a lady; tho other those of a despairing lover. Tho " Love Scene" was an overwhelming success. Faganini actually made the instrument speak. Tender accents, outbursts of jeal ousy, grief, anger, and joyful reconciliation trembled from tho alternate strings in a way that seemed truly marvellous. . Above all, tho answering look in his lady love's eyes, told Paganini that his purpose was und...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHARMS OF NOTED SOLDIERS. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

CHARMS OF NOTED SOLDIERS. The great Duke of Wellington pre served for many years, at Stratlifioldsaye, a horseshoe that be had picked up on the ere of his crowning victory at Waterloo, and the present Commander in-chief, LordJRoberts, is said to be a believer in the luck-bringing properties of the U-shaped iron that protects the horse's hoof. While engaged in suppressing the Indian Mutiny. Sir Colin Campbell invariably carried with him one of these mascots; and the celebrated French soldier, Marshal Bazaine, guarded a horseshoe that he had found on the very day of his arrival in Mexico. By a strange coincidence his good fortune departed with this charm, which was lost a week previous to the declaration of the Franco-German War. Still stranger is the belief of Admiral Cervera, the commander of the Spanish Navy in the late, war against the United States. He bears with him everywhere the left foot of a graveyard rabbit, which was caught at midnight beneath the light of a full moon. Mus...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PARTIES FOR CHILDREN. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

PARTIES FOR CHILDREN. There is nothing that a child enjoys more than entertaining hia friends in his own ; home. To give a pnity is the very acme of childish delight. No matter how busy tho mother may be, she will feel well repaid for her labour and sclf-sacrificc in tho enjoy ment of fne little ones. The whole affair can be managed so that expense and labour will be rcduccil to their minimum.People often make a great mistake in believing; that the outlay of largo sums of money and tho pre pnrntiou of elaborate programmes arc necessary in order to please children. They are more apt to be bored than entertained when the clTort to please them is too palp able. To begin with, however, one miHtake should bo avoided—that is, looking at the affair from a grown-up stand-point. Tho reason that so ninny books for childron arc failures, and bo many elaborate, costly toys are left to gather dust, while the children cling to some apparently worthless play: things, is beeauso both the books and ...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TOPICS OF INTEREST. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

TOPICS OF INTEREST. In the year 1600 it ia calculated that each man, woman, and child in England would have had just £22 if nil the wealth of, the country were equally divided among the millions that lived in that island. In 1680 this aum was more than doubled, each person's share being £46. In 1720 it had riien to £71, and in 1800 it had reached the apleudid figure of £160. The great warn of the early part of that century began to tell on the money-baga, ao each individual's share fell, in 1822, to £120. But soon after it began to- rite again, and it. has gone steadily upward ever since. In 1833 the amount was £144, in 1865 it reached an even £200, by 1875 it lmd gone up to £260, and by 1885 to £270. At present it may be set down at £300, though authorities differ. Thus, for every £1 owned by the Briton of the year 1600, the Briton of the present day owns £14. And, takinff the total wealth of the country, it is 120 times aB much now as it was three centuries ago. A gentleman by the...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TONES IN THE HUMAN VOICE. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

TONES IN THE HUMAN VOICE. One's surprise at the fact that no two per sons' voieos are perfectly alike ceases when informed by an authority on the subject that, though there are only nine perfect tones in tho human voice, tlioro are the astounding number of 17,592,186,044,415 different sounds. Of those, 14 dircct muscles produce'16,383, and 30 indirect muscles produce 173,741,823, while, in all, co-operation produces the total given above. Jack: If I should attempt to kiss you would you Bcream ? u Jess: Why, of course, ifanyono was look ing. Mrs. Cobwigger: Now, Freddy, if you're not a good hoy, I'll send you to beel without any dinner. Freddy : Say, Ma, what aro we going to have for dinner ? ••• They tell us we can love but once; Perhaps they're right; hut then, How many who have tried it'once, Will never try again ? Buzzfuzz : That saying " Marry in haste, repent at leisure," is all wrong. Sizzletop : Think so 1 Buzzfuzz: Certainly. After a man marries he has no leisure. ' An Irish...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

The best nuJiuine known is SAXDKK & SONS iiUOALYPTI HX I'HAC I'. Test iti eminent powers |ul etfccts in coughs, ccldc, influenzi,'the _ relief is instantaneous. In seiious cases, and accidents of all kinds, be they wounds, hums, scal.imgs, bruises, sprains, it is the safest remedy —no swelling—no inflammation. Like surprising effects produced in croup, diptheria, bronchitis, inilsmmation'oi lungs, jjweliing, <Se., dmrrlitca, dysentery, diseases of kid neys and nrnary organs," HANDER AND SONS' EUCAIATTI EXTRACT is in use at hospitals and ,medical clinics all oyer the globs; patronised by His Majesty the King of Italy; crowned with medals and diplomas at International Exhibition, Amster dam. Trust in this approved article and reject all others. '' ■

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CYCLE TOURIST CIRCUIT. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

A CYCLE TOURIST CIRCUIT. A syndicate has been formed in Denver to build a 1,000 mile bicycle tourist circuit in the mountains, starting from Denver and ex tending to EBtes Park, 75 miles distant. From there it is proposed to circle west and south to Manitou, via the Ute Pass, and re turning to Denver by way of Manitou Park and South Platte. The plan includes tlie building of cabins about 20 miles apart, and hotels about 75 miles apart.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOBBIES OF THE ENGLISH ROYAL FAMILY. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

HOBBIES OF THE ENGLISH ROYAL FAMILY. The Duko of Coburg, besides being a clover violin player, is an enthusiastic post ago stamp collector. All the members of the Royal family have certain hobbies, and very crcdltable ones too. Of china, bronzes, and other works of art there is no better judge than the Prince of'— 1 , at the War Game the Duke of Connaught is not to bo beaten; while tho late Duko of Albany, as a critic of Slialrcapearo and collector of folios and qu&rtOB, was well known.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SELLING A BICYCLE. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

SELLING A BICYCLE. " I want a bicycle for my boy." "Yes, sir. Want a good one? " " Yes. What will a first-class, macliino cost ?" " • " Well, a really first-class machine •will cost you £20 or £25. It isn't economy you know, to " » " Good heavens! I can't go as high aB that! Haven't you got something that " " Oil, yes; wo've got a splendid line hero for ten guineas. None better in the world. It isn't economy, I was about to say, to pay a high price just for stylo."

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN ANGEL. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

AN ANCEL. Sbo knows tlio Beoret of hor worth— Of that there's no denying— So, though she lias no wings herself, She keeps the money flying. Mabel*. I wonder if that Hiss SizzorB and ha are ongiiged. I'm suro he's proposed to her. Cluribel (with emphasis): Then of course they're engaged! Teacher : Tommy, parse discretion. Tommy (feeling his way) : Discretion—a noun, feminine. Teacher : How do you make it feminine ? Tommy : It's the better part of valour. " Young Mrs. Sappy is said to be com pletely wrapped up in her husband," ob sirved Squilldig. " Lives in a flat, eh ?" replied McSwilli geu.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GUESSES AT TRUTH. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

GUESSES AT TRUTH. The principal motive that some very am bitious women seem to have for marriage nowadays is the pleasure they expcct to de rive from spending their husband's money. Mutual love has not half so much influ cnco in producing harmony in marriage as haB mutual adaptability.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GEORGE IV.'s CORONATION BANQUET. Disorderly Proceedings. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

GEORGE lY.'s CORONATION BANQUET. Disorderly Proceedings. Some most disorderly and disgraceful proceedings took place at the coronation festivities of'George IV. which, it is to be hoped) will not be repeated in the similar ceremonial occasion after Edward VII. has been crowned. A scene fol lowed the kind's departure which peems almoBt incredible. After the service of the second coarse, the numerous attend ants, singers, and even ladies and gentlemen began to press round the royal table, as if prepared for a scramble to possess its contents. The crowd of spectators pressed nearer and nearer. For a moment only covetous eyes were cast on the spoils, as if each were afraid to begin the plunder; but, at last, a rude hand having been thrust through the first ranks, and a golden fork having been seized, this operated as a signal to all, and was followed by a ' general snatch.' In a short time all the small portable articles were transferred to the pockets of the multitude. The Lord High Ch...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DOMESTIC ANIMALS NOW WILD. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

DOMESTIC ANIMALS NOW WILD. As is well known, a oat, although probably the longest domesticated of any of our domestic animals, reverts to savagery the most quickly. An example of this is shown on Sable Island, better known as the graveyard of the Atlantic, a long, crescent-shaped, sandy bar off the coast of Nova. Scotia. Cats were introduced there in 1880. They are now as wild and savage as the genuine wild cat. One of the lighthouse men, the only inhabitants of this desolate island, was recently attacked and badly mauled by a Sable Island oat. Kven more dangerous are the eats of Gat Island, off Kerguelen Land. They live in holes in the ground, and prey on the sea birds. They are too' ferocious to be in the least tameable. A sailor shot one a year or so ago, which weighed sixteen pounds, and was almost pure white. ' Goats on the island of St. Helena have done terrible damage, having been allowed to run wild, and have utterly destroyed the beautiful vegetation which once protected th...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LIFE AT THE NORTH POLE. The Original Eden. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

LIFE AT THE NORTH POLE. ) Tbe Original Eden. There in one consequence of .the possible discovery of the north pole of the earth by one or more of the Arctic expeditions about to set out for that ice guarded goal that seems to have attracted no attention, although it is of sensational interest. If there is land at the pole, that land probably represents the true original paradise—the actual point of origin for the life of the globe. Whoever is first al the pole will be the first modern representative of the human species to stand where (it is believed) the real Adam stood; not the Adam of the Hebrew tradition, of 6,000 years ago, but the primitive Adam who carried the potentialities of undeveloped humanity in his bosom. That there was a time, long years ago, when the ancestors of all the present races of mankind dwelt at and in the immediate vicinity of the north pole is a conception that lias come down through the ancient traditions of many different peoples. This conception has not...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SENTENCED TO DEATH. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

SENTENCED TO DEATH. Saved by a Daughter. The Earl of Aberdeen, speaking at the dinner of the United Kingdom Postal and Telegraph Service Benevolent Society, at Aberdeen, recently, said they had to go back to the old mail coach days to get the picturesque aspect of the postal service, and to illustrate tliis he narrated a romantic incident which occurred in the reign of James II.—more than two hundred years ago. Sir John Cochrane, son of a fine old nobleman, Lord Dundonald, was one of tlioae who thought the liberties and interests of the country were in danger owing to the policy of the Government of the day, and resisted it. Sir John was betrayed into the hands of the enemy, and was lodged iu Edinburgh Gaol. One night the door of the prison opened, and he heard the voice of his 'daughter GriBel, who was allowed to have many talks with him. Meantime the news came that his condemnation had been settled by the Council, and that the mail would come next week with his death-warrant. Miss...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TOMMY ATKINS'S ADVENTURE. HOW HE WAS TRAPPED. A HUMOROUS SHORT STORY. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

TOMMY ATKINS'S ADVENTURE. HOW HE WAS TRAPPED. A HUMOROUS SHORT STOW. f.T T THEN we lay at Shorncliffe,' said \l\l Sergeant Harding medita * * tively, as lie cocked his eye on the white amoke which .was riaing from hia pipe, and then transferred it to the landlord's daughter, who waa bustling about serving customers. Having eyed her appreciatively for a moment, and having interpolated, 'The same again if you please, my dear,' he heard half a dozen voices say. ' Go on with the tale, Sergeant.' 'As I waa saying,' continued the Sergeant, as he looked around him with some severity, ' when I waa so rudely interrupted—of course, a daali of gin iti ' it as uaual, my dear. Oh, no, air, let me—well, if you insist, and here's my duty to you, sir.' Then the voices chimed in— 'Drive on, Sergeant.' ' 'Puke me for a gunner ? More like an ambulauce waggon some of you'll be wanting. If you want to keep on ^interrupting, tell yourselves the atory. A little pressing, and a good deal of humility, and t...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A DANCE ON THE GREEN. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

A DANCE ON THE GREEN. By Con Amorb. A bonnie lass, 1 trow, she was, A bonnie lass as e'er waB seen ; Oh, fair befa' the bonnie Iiwb That danoed wi' me upo' the green. They a' were there, the young an' fair, Whaur it her wad the kiknmers been V But wha the gree bore aff was she That danoed wi' rae upo' the green. A bonnie lass, eto. Her foot was licht, her e'e wasbricht, A' owre she was as neat's a proen ; Oh, beauty's queen was she, I ween, That danced wi' me upo' the_green. A bonnie lass, eto. The piper chiel' he played fu' weel, He really was the dancer's freen' ; His raltlin' tune owre sune was dune For twa that danced upo' the greeu. A bonnie lass, eto. Though folk their share may get o' care, They no'er can be forfochen clean, Gin they ha'e had, when young an' glad, A dance like yon upo' the green. A bonnie Ibbs, eto.

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TESTING CHRISTIANITY. [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

TESTING CHRISTIANITY. If a man says to me: 'I don't believe in Christianity,' I have just one question to ask him: 'Did you ever put it to the test?' 'No.' •You are a fool, then, and I won't bother with you.' As much as there is at stake in this question, be tells me: 'I don't believe in it,' and yet he says: 'I never tested it.' He is a hard case, sure enough. ' This passenger train runs to Chattanooga in five hours and forty-five minutes.' 'I don't believe it.' 'The way to test it is to come with me and I will show you.' 'I haven't any money.' 11 will pay your way.' • No; I can't go with you.' ' Well, you will take my word that it goes there, in that time ?' ' No.' ' Then you had belter rack off to the asylum or the gaol.' He is either a rascal or a fool, or both. I would much rather be a rascal than a fool. You can reform a rascal; but what are you going to do with a fool ? An ocean steamer of the first class, going at lull speed, cannot be brought to a standstill in less thain t...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CARNEGIES "AT HOME." [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

THE CARNEGIES " AT HOME." If you are a guest of Mr. Carnegie you have a 'good time.' He is im mensely hospitable and makes an excellent and thoughtful host. In this he is more than ably helped by charming Mrs. Carnegie. She is indeed charming, and, every much younger than her husband—a good twenty years or more—is the heart and soul of the gaiety, the dancing, and the games for which the million aire has little inclination, but which are the natural amusements of the younger members of his big ■ house parties. He is devoted to bis wife, and is not above showing it in a pretty way. For example, I remember (says a'writer in ' M.A.P.') they had one very pleasant custom. Mrs. Carnegie would come down to the drawing-room before dinner with a black silk bag. In this she had placed little scraps of paper upon each of which was written the name of some lady of the party. These were drawn by the men, and thus each got a partner. One night the man of millions 'drew ' his wife, and I shall not...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE ORIGIN OF "PUNCH." [Newspaper Article] — Bowral Free Press — 22 January 1902

THE ORIGIN OF " PUNCH." It is as one of the founders and first editor of' Punch' that Lemon is best known. From 1841 his history is the history of ' Punch.' Whether the title of that paper was borrowed srom Douglas Jerrold's 1 Punch in London ' or not, the conception of the journal itself is due to Lemon and I Henry Mayhew, and occurred to them in June, 1841, at Lemon's house in Newcastle-street, Strand, where Lemon drafted the first prospectus. | The first number was published by Bryant on July 17, 1841, and the periodical was owned in equal shares ' by Ebenezer Landells, the engraver, Last the printer, and Lemon and Mayhew, who jointly edited it. For some time it was most unsuccessful, and was only saved from disaster by the money which Lemon was making by his plays. The paper was then purchased by Bradbury and Evans. Mayhew retired from the editorship, and the sole charge was left to Lemon, who retained it to his death. His salary was at first 30s. a week ; at the last it was £1,...

Publication Title: Bowral Free Press
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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