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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. u ' The American Revolution, as it is called, ditt'ered essentially from overy revolution, save one, which had pre ceded it. There had been revolutions before some instigated by ambition, some the result of dominant anarchy, others that were fermented by a spirit of retaliation; this was a rebellion of manhood against tyranny. It was des tined to become the supreme struggle between man, made in the image and likeness of God the All-Father, and despotism having its origin and center in hell. Its solitary precursor was that confederacy of bishops, knights and barons which forced from the reluctant hands of John the Great Charter on the plain of Runnymede. The Declaration of Independence was a call to universal manhood to struggle against universal oppression. For the first time for centuries the op pressed had lifted up his face to God and declared himself free. It was fit he should do this in the New World; the old was not ripe for it. But here and there througho...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

-111 -in uti iNW iwpi THJE INDIAIST ADVOCATE. j 1 r boy. What could ho do? His youth was against him. He had rank, en thusiasm, and perhaps some genius, but he had no experience. Lafayette persisted, and, in persisting, showed the American that he had an old head on young shoulders. He retired with a paper which granted him the rank of major-general in the army of the Unit ed States, and which stipulated that he should depart for the scene of ac tion as soon as circumstances would allow, and personally engage in the .struggle for American independence. This momentous interview took place on the 7th of December, 1776. Little time was lost in getting ready. M. du Bois martin was at once de spatched to Bourdeaux to purchase and equip a ship. Necessarily the ut most secrecy was observed. Louis XVI., anxious to wound England, the hereditary foe of the French nation, yet hesitated in striking the decisive blow. He assured the American agents of his sympathy, still he wav ered in declaring...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. of America. He left behind home, friends, country, oven the wife he loved. A priest of Liberty, he had dared risk his life in her service. Yet, whether for weal or woe, the die was cast. continued in our next. Agnosticism versus Common Sense. (CONTINUKD.) Although in his lecture, "Why I am an Agnostic," Mr. Ingersoll seems to acknowledge his ignorance of those sciences on which he pretends to base his arguments, it would be hard to fully realize that fact were it not for certain utterances which, like the howl of the wolf of Lafontaine, betray the man: "A wolf who found in cautious flocks His tithes beginning to be few, Thought that he'd play the part of fox A character at least quite new. A shepherd's hat and coat he took, And from a branch he made a hook ; Nor did the pastoral pipe forget. Could he but mock The shepherd's voice he'd lure the flock ; He thought he could. That spoiled the whole affair he'd spoken ; His howl re-echoed through the wood ; The game ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

mmmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Haeckel holds that the species is "the whole succession of organism which exhibits the same forms in the same environment." This last definition of the species is incomplete and obscure. It sets forth no absolute standard by which we can classify the diverse spe cies, or even distinguish them from their genera. This definition would make man a genus, and the different races would become species, which is absurd. The human race is in exist ence all over the world, and its envir onment is varied with the food, the climate and other conditions of those different parts of the world which it inhabits. Now, if Haeckel's defini tion be true, the organism, or, in oth er words, the organical structure of man,, would not exhibit those same forms in the far East, for instance, that are seen in the West. Man would show the influence of environment, and so those peoples that have been vegetarians from times beyond the memory of man could show to our ad miring agno...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 9 L are without foundation, and if there bo anything liko the change of one species into another, it must be that of the noblest of all species, man, who, through the agnostic doctrines, is made to indulge freely in those things sought for by his lower nature, and which make of him a lustful ape and a bray ing donkey. Tennyson tells us of the conse quences of agnostic doctrines: "You that woo the voices, tell them old Experience is a fool ; Tench your flattered kings that only those who cannot read can rule. Pluck the mighty from their seat, but set no meek ones in their place ; Pillory wisdom in your markets, pelt your offal at her face. Tumhle Nature heel over head, and yelling with the yelling street, Set the feet above the brain, and swear the brain is in the feet. Bring the old dark ages hack, without the faith, without the hope; Break the State, the Church, the throne, and roll their ruins down the slope Authors, atheist, essayist, novelist, realist, rhyms...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

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Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

?HE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 11 TMe Indian -Advocate Is a Quarterly Review, published by tho Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Ter., to plead tho cause of the last remnants of Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe ; their progress in education and religion ; their occupa tions, Industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis slons, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not bo found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will bo used for educating and converting tho Irdlans of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart P. O , Okla. Ter. Al'PROVKl) HY Itiairr RKV. THEO. MEERSCHAERT, VlCAtt APOSTOLIC OK OKLAHOMA AND Indian Tehiutoky. A Quarteily Roviow, entered at tho Sacrod Heart Post Ollico in Oklahoma Territory, as second-class matter. Subscriptions CO Cents per Yeur. Single Copies 15 Cents. JANUARY, 1899. Editorials and Locals. The present nu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

J H 12 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Work reveals character. Five of Hobson's companions during his perilous performance in Santiago harbor are Catholics Montague, Phil lips, Kelly, Charette and Murphy. In the last meeting held by the board of Indian Commissioners, Mr. James, acting as temporary chairman, in his opening address outlined "the work, past and prospective, of civilizing the red man, declaring his conviction that the hope of future progress in this line lies in the direction of religious ac tivity." Religion is the mollifying influence, the purifying ingredient, the basis of any worthy civilization and pre-eminently raises rational beings above all other creation on this earth. But Christian civilization has proved itself the highest boon to man. The strong est thing in the strange course now be ing pursued towards the Indians is that the Indians are not only willing to re ceive, but ask to be the beneficiaries of the religious education that would se cure this "future progress" ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

TSf-fCFW mwW' Mf THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 13 To know a thing wo must soo it as a whole, to understand it, we must see it as a part. Rev. Father Placidus has been nominated- assistant of Rev. Father Hip polyte. Right Rev. Abbot Ignatius Conrad, of New Subiaco, Ark., was the preacher of our annual Retreat. Rev. Father Hippolyte, pastor of Le high and adjacent Missions, is erecting a house of worship at Durant, Choctaw Nation. If genius be a form of insanity, as has been claimed, intense religious en thusiasm would seem to have a close connection with physical as well as mental disease. American rule, which was to be so beneficial, you know, has hardly com menced yet in Porto Rica, but the islanders are already complaining of its character. Right Rev. Bishop Meerschaert con ferred Holy Orders on six candidates on the first Sunday of Advent. We under stand that in a six-month Sacred Heart Mission will have seven new priests. Last fall the Right Rev. Bishop of the Indian Territory blessed a ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

14 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. special chord, and sound it perfectly, is- what gives supremo interest to hu man life. It should enter equally into the smallest as well as the greatest actions. It makes each action impor tant in itself as a note which goes to make up the music of the whole. It does not preclude versatility , for a ver satile character may, like a 'Tarantala dance in music, be harmonious to itself. The sense of harmony restores the pro portion between the ideal and the prac tical; it tests one by the other, while in its nature it is progressive, and conse quently satisfying. As there must be no abrupt ending to harmonious sound so chance and caprice must, as far as possible, be banished from our lives. Harmony adds a dignity to what would otherwise be mere struggling against adverse circumstances. As life goes on, the force must be gradually gathered in, and concentrated upon some main thread. We must cease to be children playing with our materials, and must use them to buil...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 15 Of course, the most rampant of these ranters come from among the sensation al preachers. For all uncharitableness, irrationality and malice, commend us always to those gentry. And, very naturally upon the lips of such, the denunciation of the foreign-born citi zen lapsed rapidly and readily into the abuse of the Catholic. Facts and ar guments are not given. Orators of this stripo claim for themselves the privileges and immunities of the poet. Dealing in fancy and soaring into the imaginative, they are not to bo tram meled by the rules that men of other mould yield submission to. In turgid rhetoric, flavored with the usual spice of cant and seasoned with unstinted malignity, we are informed that the Catholic is a menace to the nation and its institutions, a clog upon its prog ress and a deadly foe to education and enlightenment! Is it not, after all, little else than idle to deal with trump ery such as this ? The Catholic a menace to the nation! When? Was it w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

16 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE- for none other of our institutions? And in the day when our Protestant brethren have deemed n revision of the Scriptures us a crying necessity, is it possible that the system of the public school churns an immunity from criti cism which they were not willing to grant to the Revealed Word? Neither Catholic nor .Jew nor atheist can raise a finger to mar that system save by process of law or the exercise of the electoral franchise. But, ap pealing to either, he stands upon his constitutional rights, and is neither to be outfaced or daunted by empty shriekings of disloyalty. The day has passed when menacing bigotry could fright the Catholic from his rights. It may work and has worked insidiously against his claims. It has ostracized him from the highest honors of the State; it has torn from him the mis sions he has founded. But, even when uttered by the lips of a would-be Caesar, the Catholic has learned to laugh to scorn the charge of disloyalty and the vaporing...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 17 INDIAN LORE. THE COTTONWOOD TRICK. The cottonwood tree is the most characteristic tree of the plains and of the arid region between the Rockies and the Sierras. It is a species of pop lar and takes its name from the white downy blossom fronds, resembling cot ton, which come out upon it in the spring. The cottonwood and a species of stunted oak, with the mesquite in the South, are almost the only trees to be found upon the great plains extend ing from the Saskatchewan southward into Texas. As it never grows out upon the open, but always close along the borders of the few streams, it is an unfailing indication of water either on or near the surface, in a region nearly waterless. Between the bark and the wood there is a sweet milky juice of which the Indians are very fond. As one who had been educated in the East said, "It is their ice cream," and they frequently strip off the bark and scrape the trunk in order to procure it. Horses also are fond of this sweet j...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

''f!11t$Y'n - -r,- mmmmmmmmm 3S THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. the head and skin of a buffalo hung from the center pole of the lodge, and in the fearful torture that accompanied this dance among some tribes, the dancers dragged around the circle buf falo skulls tied to ropes which were fastened to skewers driven through holes cut in their bodies and limbs. A buffalo skull is placed in front of the sweat lodge, and on the battlefield of Wounded Knee buffalo skulls and plates of dried meat placed at the head of the graves were seen. The buffalo was the sign of the Creator on earth as the sun was his glorious manifestation in the heavens. The hair of the buffalo was an important element in the prepar ation of "medicine," whether for war, hunting, love, or medicine proper, and for such purposes the Indian generally selected a tuft taken from the breast close under the shoulder of the ani mal. When the Kiowa, Commanche and Apache delegates visited "Washing ton in the spring of 1894, they made an e...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 19 below them a sea, and far out beyond it toward the east was the boundry of the earth, where lived the friends they were marching to rejoin. Taking up a pebble in his beak, the crow then dropped it into the water and it became a mountain towering up to the land of dead. Down its rocky slope he brought his army until they halted at the edge of the water. Then, taking some dust in his bill, the crow flew out and dropped it into the water as he flew, and it be came a solid arm of land stretching from the spirit world to the earth. He returned and flew out again, this time with some blades of grass, which he dropped upon the land thus made, and at once it was covered with a green sod. Again he returned, and again flow out, this time with some twigs in his bill, and dropping these also upon the new land, at once it was covered with a for est of trees. Again ho flew back to the base of the mountain, and is now, for the fourth time, coming on at the head of all the c...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

m,-Wf!" ft" "WHIP" 20 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE- L tions of a trading post, and when our cavalcade of three covered wagons, ton Indian ponies and fifteen persons ar rived at its final destination we were inclined to look upon even the mere necessities of life as absolute luxuries. The tinned meat and fruit which form ed the chief articles of our menu even the beds of Navajo blankets spread upon the ground were thor oughly appreciated, but aboVe all we welcomed the fresh, cool water which for the first time during the journey we had in plenty. The question of water is the most serious consideration in this country. It is so scarce that every drop to be used during a trip across the desert must be carried in canteens and carefully hoarded. A trading station in the far West is indeed typical of the country. It is built of rough pine boards, generally consisting of two or three small rooms, with dirt floor, having one apartment fitted up with shelves and a counter. Here all day long come the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

THE INDIAN ADV0bATE. 21 nothing until they are fivo or six years old, and look like so many chubby, animated bronze Cupids, with large, soft eyes and untidy hair. The young girls dress their long and shiny locks in a decidedly original manner. The hair is divided into two parts, and each part wound tightly over a wooden frame shaped like a small croquet wicket, tightly bound with yards of black string, twisted from human hair. Then the frames are pulled out, leav ing great whorls, like cart wheels, on each side of the head, The Mokis are inclined to be short and rather stout. They live almost entirely on vegetables. Their corn fields, peach orchards, which are fine and free from blight, bean fields, and large melon patches supply them with most of their food, supplemented on special occasions by supplies obtained from the traders in the valley below. WHITES NOT WKLCOMKI). At Oraibi, where the principal snake dance occurred this year, the people wore not over friendly the presence of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

22 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ton miles distant, to which they had gone long before daybreak with offer ings to the rain gods. As they come nearer, running rapidly through the fields below, the excitement grows in tense, for they are racing. As the win ner, rushing up the mesa side, passes over the roof of the snake kiva the whole village cheers him. In his hand he bears a small wicker canteen of water from the spring, which he is permitted to empty over his particular field of corn, thus insuring him a good crop in anjr event. Some of the racers carry an object which I shall have to call a "whizzer." It is a long string to which is attached a flat bit of paint ed wood. This they whirl around so rapidly that it makes a whistling sound, supposed to symbolize thunder. Following the priests, the boys of the village, gayly attired, swarm up the mesa bearing melons, cornstalks and flowers. When they appear all the maidens rush after them, striving to get possession of the trophies. This scramb...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 23 attached a string and feather pointing towards the pueblo. On the fourth day after death the soul of the dead child comes from the grave, partakes of tho food, and following the direction indi cated by the feather returns to its home and is born again into the same family. The grown people are buried in the sand at the foot of the mesa; food and prayer sticks are also placed on their graves, only tho feather points towards the west and their souls journey to the "skeleton house," where the sun leaves the earth and the "Ivachinas," the de parted ancestors, live. HEADY FOR THE SNAKE DANCE. About an hour before sunset the peo ple begin to congregate in the plaza. The roofs of the surrounding houses are all occupied, while picturesque groups, idly watching the white people, await the last scene in the snake ceremonies. The plaza is now in readiness; the "kisi," a bower of cottonwood branches, the opening concealed by a white cot ton cloth of native weaving, is er...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

FT WBWPWW I IP 24 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. called the "carrier." The second is the "hugger." He places his loft hand on the shoulder of the carrier, while with his snake whip ho attracts the at tention of the snake. Presently the carrier opens his mouth and drops his burden to the ground. Now it becomes the business of the third man, the Vgatherer," to see that his charge does not escape. He follows the serpent around-, preventing it from coiling by brushing it with the whip, and after a time he picks it up suddenly and hands it to one of the antelope men. This process is repeated until all the snakes, twenty-five or thirty in number, have been duly danced around the circle. Now the chief priest sprinkles a cir cle of sacred meal upon the ground. Within this the antelope men deposit their squirming burdens in a heap; each snake priest rushes upon them, gathers as many as he can carry, and runs rapidly down the mesa to the plain below, where the reptiles are set free to carry the rain pr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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