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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Full List of U. S. Patents Issued to Pacific Coast Inventors. [From Official Reports to DEWEY & CO., V. S. and Foreign Patent Agents, and Publishers of the Scientific Prksh.] For the Week Ending February 14th. Printing-Press.—Amos H. Bangle, Brooklyn, Cal. Lamp-Bracket for Sewing-Machines.— Henry Campbell, San Francisco, Cal. Hub and Axle.—Carlos R. Donnar, Sonora, Cal. Lubricator. —-Nicholas SeibortSan Francisco, Cal. Locomotive-Boiler Furnaces.—Andrew Jackson Stevens, San Francisco, Cal. Note.—Copies of V. S. and Foreign Patents furnished by Dkwey & Co., in the shortest time possible (by telegraph or otherwise) at the lowest rates. All pater t business for Pacific coast inventors transacted with greater security and in much less time than by any other agency.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Notices of Recent Patents. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Notices of Recent Patents. Hay and other Presses.— M. T. Northrup, Hornitoa, Cal. The object of this invention is to provide an improved press for packing hay for transportation, and for wool or cotton. The press consists of a strong frame or box which lies on the ground, so as not to rise to an inconvenient higtit. A follower is arranged to move forward and back within the box. After the cords are laid, the box is filled with hay, the door at the top closed and drawn down tightly by a peculiar elbow lever, and the follower is moved by a long lever operating in a horizontal plane, one end being pinned to the follower, while the fulcrum is on a block or guide a short distance from this end. The guide moves in ways at right angles with the movement of the follower, so that as the lever is moved around, it carries the guide across the line of travel of the follower, until the outer end of the lever, the block and the follower are in a line with the plane in which the follower travels, ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POULTRY NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

POULTRY NOTES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POULTRY AS A BUSINESS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

POULTRY AS A BUSINESS. TheAntiooh (Contra Costa) Ledger very truly says: "If a man has a well-conducted chicken ranch in these days he can make money. Eggs are high, ami will be higher still, before the winter is over, and chickens and ducks always have a good marketable value about holiday time—in fact they find sale at fair prices any time. A few acres of land with four or five hundred dollars, can bo made to yield a good income, more than if put to any other use, and we cannot understand why farmers do not pay more attention to this profitable business. A dozen eggs is worth more here than a bushel of wheat in Hie Western States, and can be produced with less trouble and risk. Care and attention are requisite, to be sure, to make success certain, but no more than in any other business. There are plenty of places in this vicinity which cannot be advantageously used for any other purpose. Rabbits,* frogs and terrapins will pay well, too. We have known fortunes to be made in this bu...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POINTS OF POULTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

POINTS OF POULTRY. A subscriber asks us to give the ajipropriato terms for the different points of poultry, so that they may be understood. To more fully illustrate the answer to the query, we give herewith, from Moore's Rural New Yorker, Man engravigg of a cock with the points marked. A, neck-hackle; B, saddle-hackle; C, tail; D, breast; E, upper wing coverts; F, lower wing coverts; G, primary quills; H, thighs; I, legs; X, comb; L, wattles; M, ear lobe. _ jgf '

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DETERIORATION OF POULTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

DETERIORATION OF POULTRY. 'S'A correspondent of the Poultry Bulletin, gives the following as one of the chief causes of the deterioration of poultry: The majority of farmers have always considered poultry of little or no consequence, and they havo allowed them to run wild and take care of themselves and degenerate from year to year. They generally let them roost in their pig pen, or on their wagons, or wherever they can find a place. They seldom if ever feed them, and allow them to make their nests wherever they can, all over the premises. When they hatch and make their appearance with their chickens the farmers wives and children feed them occasionally. But they very rarely coop them and keep them out of the wet grass or feed them regularly, in consequence of which, fully seventy per cent, die; of those that are raised, the largest and best are selected and sold, as they are thought to be worth too much to keep, and the culls which are not good enough to sell, are kept and bred fro...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POULTRY RAISING. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

POULTRY RAISING. Why Hens must be kept in Small Flocks. Whenever we try to make any animal live contrary to its habits in a wild state, nature, unwilling to l»e thwarted, will have its revenge in some way. The hen originated in tho jungles of India, and when wild and before taken from its native forest, this variety of bird had an abundance of pure air to breathe and plentiful ventilation through their leafy roosting places. One leader, only, accompanied the flock, who allowed no rival in his family. With proper care a large number of chickens may be raised together; but when they begin to lay, if their natural habits are interfered with, the keeper will fail to receive due returns, as the penalty he must pay for violating a law of nature. The natural and proper way to keep hens is to provide separate apartments for every family, and not allow the family to exceed, say 25 in number, including one male bird. Mr. H. H. Stoddard, of Hartford, Conn., writes to the Poultry Bulletin, upon...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURE IN ARIZONA. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

AGRICULTURE IN ARIZONA. Arizona produces something besides gold and Apaches. Cotton of a texture similar to the best product of the Atlantic States is produced there. The seed from this Cotton has been planted in South Carolina, where Sea Island Cotton of good quality has been raised from it. Grapes bear there the second year after setting out the slips. Tobacco, figs, oranges, lemons, sugar-cane and sweet potatoes, the finest ever seen, are raised there. Corn does not do well generally, for want of rain. Irish potatoes are grown, but not with much success; the summers are too hot and dry. Wheat and barley yield from 30 to 35 bushels and more to the acre, according to the nature of the ground and care employed in the culture. A field of 90 acres was reported, last season, to have yielded a fraction over il bushels to the acre. Another person reports 00 bushels of barley to the acre, and a profit of #1,000 last season, from a small farm of only 20 acres. Farming operations there, are...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POPULAR LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

POPULAR LECTURES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Chemistry and its Applications. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Chemistry and its Applications. [Prof. Ezra S. Carr before the Mechanic Arts Coli.kiib, Mechanics' Institute Hall, S. F. Reported expressly for the Press.] Carbonic Acid—lts Occurrence. Lect. 11. Feb. 25.—1n my last lecture, said the Professor, I spoke about the most common thing in the world, —oxygen. I propose this evening to speak of another common tiling, carbonic acid, which, although not so abundant as oxygen, is yet very plentiful and has some remarkable relations to animal and vegetable life. Carbonic acid is found in the atmosphere, but in minute quantities, constituting about .04 per cent, of it. Carbonic acid is one of the products of volcanic action, and it is often produoed in the vicinity of volcanoes, when these are not in action, from some subterranean source. It is produced in connection with many mineral springs, by combustion, respiration, and decay. We find it in nature chemically combined with other bodies and forming solid materials. Marble, limestone, chalk ar...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

Nevada Coal. —The Humboldt Register has seen some specimens of good coal taken from a vein lately discovered near Argenta station, Lander county. Quicksilver. —Another quicksilver mine has been opened which promises very favorably. It is owned by the Whitton brothers, and located near Sebastopol, in Napa county. A shaft was sunk 115 feet, a tunnel then run 550, a sink again made about HO feet, when water was struck, with a bed of from four to six inches of cinnabar. The owners have a furnace in full blast, and have obtained about $2,000 Avorth of quicksilver.— Grass Valley Union. The Leyden coal mine, near Golden City, Colorado, is on tire. It was opened and then allowed to remain unworked sometime, when it commenced to burn.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

GOOD HEALTH.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SORE EYES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

SORE EYES. [Written for the Press.] Those who are not acquainted with the structure of the eye are apt to look upon it as a very small thing, having a single individuality, and therefore subject to a single form of disease. In other words, a sore eye is simply looked upon as subject to no more variations than is a rotten potato. Such persons suppose that all that is necessary to do in the treatment of a sore eye is to apply some kind of eye-water, and if that does not cure, nothing more can be done. We meet people almost daily who have had sore eyes, varying in time from a few days to weeks or months or, perhaps, years, till their sight is either entirely destroyed or greatly impaired, without making any effort to save it, except simply to make some kind of local application that somebody has told them was "good for sore eyes." Different Kinds of Diseases of the Eye. A little review of some of the most common forms of diseases of the eye, it is believed, will be both instructive and...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AIDS TO DIGESTION. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

AIDS TO DIGESTION. Dr. Marcet writes, reports the Lancet, in a pamplet just issued from the press " On a New Process for Preparing Meat for Weak Stomachs, as follows:— " I have often thought that, if there were a means of preparing meat, so as to enable its easy digestion by weak stomachs a great boon might be conferred on a very large class of sufferers; and it has occurred to me tbat by submitting cooked meat to some process similar to that which it undergoes in the stomach, food thus pi'epared would require but very little effort of the stomach to complete its digestion, and thus the body could be efficiently nourished notwithstanding a debilitated condition of the digestive organs." Hydrochloric acid and pepsine being the principal natural agents for the digestion of meat in the stomach, he has thought that these substances might be applied to digest cooked meat in some degree, previously to its being eaten; mid that by giving the stomach animal food thus softened and dissolved,...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. A small but ancient and reconstructed Family awaits our visitors this week,at the very entrance to our farm. The paucity of their raiments will be excused, for they are a late importation and have not yet become accustomed to modern ways and customs. We have placed a Ramie plant near at hand, behind which they may retire, if overcome in time by a sense of their exalted position. Close at hand they have the library of Mechanical and Scientific Progress, which will contain many wonders for them. From San Diego and from Tuolumne county contributions come to our post-office, whore is given an illustration of one of the reasons Why Farming does not pay. Dr. Thomas tells us still more of Ancient Agriculture as practiced by the Greeks and Romans. Letters of encouragement and inquiry find here a nook. Oregon is well represented, and has a place beside California in the Agricultural Notes. And just round the corner, Arizona is met with. Then come Notes of Recent Patents, whi...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

The Amebican Submerged Pump.— This pump has been successfully used in the Eastern states, in Europe and in South America, so that, as the manufacturers say, it is no untried novelty. We have been shown letters from various parts of this coast, also, testifying to its excellence. Its principle is that of a double-acting force pump, with a heavy double-acting piston, cast in one piece, and a double-act-ing iron valve within the same, without the use of leather valves or any packing whatever. As a ship and factory pump, for use on the farm or in the house, for pumping coal tar, acids, etc., it is highly recommended. It issimple, durable, cheap and powerful. We refer our readers 1«. the advertisement on the last page. Japan Sheep.—A cotemporary asks: "What has "become of the Japan Sheep introduced into the United States several years since? They were sai Itobe of good size, hardy, had coarse wool, and produced lambs twice a year, from two to four at a time."

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE WHEAT MARKET. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

THE WHEAT MARKET. It is somewhat singular that the wheat market in this city should be declining while an important advance is taking place in Liverpool, as will be Been by reference to our market report. Tho abundani rains in most sections of tho State, seeming to guarantee full crops, and the statement, in certain quarters that the advent of peace in Europe will permit of a largo sowing of spring crops has doubtless led to this result. But with the present programme of both the German and French armies, in and around Paris and elsewhere, there is very little probability of any present utilization of much of the labor which has been so long withdrawn from industrial pursuits. Men who have been through such exciting scenes as have characterized this terrible struggle, cannot doff their uniforms and go immediately into the field of labor—be it on the farm on in the shop. Throughout a large portion of France most of the essentials of agricultural industry have been so utterly destroye...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE VINEYARD. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

THE VINEYARD.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CULTIVATION OF THE VINE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

CULTIVATION OF THE VINE. Having completed the annual pruning, the next operation to be performed in the vineyard is the spring cultivation. It requires some experience and judgment to determine when and how to cultivate the vineyard; for each locatity and soil requires a treatment peculiar to itself. And the same vineyard requires a different treatment, depending on the pm-poses for which the grapes are to be used. Cultivation on Dry Soil. If your vines are on a dry soil —one that is not well calculated to retain the moisture well into the summer months—then the cultivation should begin early, and continue as long as any weed seed wrll sprout and grow. The cultivation of such should be deep and thorough. The ground should be finely and thoroughly pulverized, from the depth of eight inches to a foot or sixteen inches; plowing (both ways and close up to the vine. Care should be had that this plowing is done when the ground is in the proper condition, so that it will not break up into ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 4 March 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BY OUU LADY EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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