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Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
382,303 results
IT THRILLS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

IT THRILLS "CONTAGION to This World" is the story of a young scientist who has the misfortune to come into this world a hunchback, and very repulsive looking. His eyes alone are beautiful, but no- body pauses to look into them, and. in- deed the people he grew up among are so cruelly unkind as to seem unreal to the Australian mind. The ill-treatment he received through childhood and adolescence engenders in him hatred for the human race, and he sets his great powers to work to have vengeance on them. He does this by the scientist's great weapon—the bacillus. The one he invents is particularly hor- rible—it is named the "G" bacillus, and it destroys memory. Devastation follows. Mechanics and professional men forget their skill and become as children, and thereby whole- sale disasters occur on land and sea. Fires which men have forgotten how to check lay waste the cities of the world, and our civilisation is wiped out. The ending is on a note of hope, and readers who enjoy their readi...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
NEW TIMBER LANE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

NKW TIMBER LANE "NEWTIMBER LANE," by Ernest Ray- mond (Angus and Robertson). Those who have read "Tell England" will welcome and love the author's new book, "Newtimber Lane." This, we are told, is the writing of Sir Edmund Earl- win, of Cowbourne, in Sussex, who at 83 takes us back and shares with us the joys and beauties he has met in the Sussex Lanes, in Old London, Old Paris and Old Boulogne. The style is clear and flowing, the characters are well drawn, the scenes vividly portrayed. For those readers with a taste for a leisurely story, with no undue stressing of sex problems, though the hero has his love tangles, this book will prove a boon. The dominant note of the book is love of the English countryside, and prob- ably no writer has a more intimate knowledge of rural England than Mr. Raymond.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
NEW BOOKS AT A GLANCE COOKING SECRETS— Told in a Book [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

NEW BOOKS AT A GLANCE COOKING SECRETS— Told in a Book If you want to know how to cook a dainly repast and serve it with the proper condiments and appropriate wines, read "French Cookery," an entertain- ing book by Mrs. Elizabeth Lucas. ARCHBISHOP CATTANEO, who dear-   ly loved masing a joke, once said of Australian cooking: "You can describe it as Australia Limited." "London at present has gone cooking dotty," writes a correspondent, who de- scribes how men and women are taking cooking lessons from M. Vivian Vander- becken. who demonstrates at 17 Berkeley Square. Gwen McCormack, daughter of the famous singer, is one of the well-known girls who is studying there. M. Vanderbecken teaches them all how to PREPARE dishes. He is not content with mere demon- strating. He insists on copper sauce- pans. Mrs. E. V. Lucas, too, is strong upon the point of having copper saucepans. GATHERS RECIPES When Mrs. E. V. Lucas accompanies her husband on his wanderings she spends her time in...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Don't GUESS YOUR HAND Says Frank Cayley [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Don't GUESS YOUR HAND Says Frank Cayley Article 2: "Hand Valuation" WE must now devote our time to the study of "Hand Valua- tion" without which bidding would become mere guess work. No details of Contract scoring are needed al present, beyond those giren last week. THE following table should be com- mitted to memory: THE TABLE OF HONOR TRICKS (High Card Values) ½ Trick K x Q J x Q x in one suit, plus J x in an- other II Trick 112 Tricks A A Q K Q IA j io K J X ¡K Q J Kx in one K Q 10 suit, plus Qxin an- other 2 Tricks! A K N.B.—x signifies any card lower than   a ten. An original bid must not be made un- less the hand contains at least 2½ honor tricks spread over two or more suits. For   this reason, the combination A K Q is only counted as 2 tricks in the early   rounds of calling. In an average deal, 3 out of the 13 tricks are won by honors, and the re- mainder by low cards. The number of low card tricks you make in attack is directly depend...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
POLO SECRETS Told by The HORSES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

POLO SECRETS Told by The HORSES By ETTA COWAN, who interviewed the ponies before the play started at Kensing- ton this week. "MY Dear Palato, what a perfectly lovely monogram you have on your modish polo coat!" "Yes, it is rather sweet. Wallace Horsley is a most thoughtful man. He knows I understand all my duties in life, and. of course, when he whispers to me 'Go,' I always do my best." "By the way, have you seen the 'Silver Queen'? She is a modish woman. You could truthfully describe her as a platinum blonde. Curtis Skene took her ticket from Camden; she really does look very regal, and Camden rather prides itself on her silvery pony-skin coat." "You should watch out, too, for the smart creature wearing the latest thing in flea-bitten-grey suiting. Will let you into a secret. His owner makes a great friend of him, and they will be seen together at Kensington." "Coramal is a pony with a clean, white face. At the word 'chukker' one ear is pricked up; almost the same effect as the wo...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

LOVELY HAIR is the key to feminine charm . . . An adorable face, faultless skin, sparkling white teeth . . . how often these girlish charms are spoiled by hair that falls woefully short of perfection! And how often the plainest of features are glorified . . . made truly beauti- ful by lovely hair! Indeed, the most important secret of feminine charm is lovely hair, as every skilled beauty expert will tell you. Permanent Waving DONE WELL will create naturally wavy or naturally curly hair, increasing its lustre and lending to it the fresh, glamorous tints of youth. . . . Much de- pends on the operator. Buckinghams only employ senior skilled operators, and in their sachets use only the best ingredients — Aqua Pure Oil costs three times as much as the Oil generally used—none other will do us—it is the attention to such details that give such satisfactory results. So next time let Buckinghams give you a perfect wave—ring F 3141. Amazing Offer—Expertly waved—& guaranteed &n...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
NEW GUINEA THROUGH a WOMAN'S EYES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

NEW GUINEA THROUGH a WOMAN'S EYES IN the territory the menus are marked thus:— 1. Soup. 2. Chicken and ham. 3. Plum pudding. If two of us wanted soup, we would ask the boy "to catch 'im two fella number one." One has always to ask for the number   on the menu, as the "boys" cannot re- member soup. Among the natives, brunettes are very plebeian. Even cannibal gentlemen pre- fer blondes. The "boys" do all house work, garden and cook, but ironing— O ye gods! One of the men gave them his shirts and pyjamas to launder, and they were returned minus buttons—they had taken them off and made armlets out of them ! It is difficult to make the boys boil the white clothes. "Too much cook 'em," they tell you. The funniest sight is to see them play- ing football. I never laughed so much in my life. They just wear lap-laps (loin cloths) and heavy boots, and the match inevitably ends in a hand-to- hand fight. * * * EVERY evening at 10.30 we listen-in for the news from down south, re- la...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
BRAINWAVES! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Conducted by L. W. Lower   "LOUISE, this is the FOURTH time   you ask what is trump!" "But, Charlie dear, you URGED me to take some interest in the game!" Prize of 10/- to E. Osborne, 24 Bou- vardia Street, Five Dock. MA (discovering daughter in the   embrace of the boy friend) : "Well, I never!" Daughter: "Oh, mother! You must have!" THEN there was the girl, who thought that a draft agreement was when two people got up to shut the door. THERE'S no doubt about some doctors being absolute robbers. I read only the other day about a woman who had her face lifted by one of them. "YOU just do what I say, old man, and she'll be eating out of your hand in no time." "I'll try it." said the harassed hus- band— "Well, how did it go?" "You were right. She ate out of my hand, all right. Had to get six stitches put in it, and the doctor says I may lose the use of two fingers." MISS L. MARTIN, of Leichhardt, wants to know why all barristers are nicknamed "Ca...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

—the guest was fidgety— (if only her hostess would offer her a cigarette) You may be only an occasional smoker yourself. All the more reason to remember to provide cigarettes for your guests. There's nothing like cigarettes to put guests at their ease. Capstans, of course—the cigarettes that are smoked by more people than those of any other brand. CAPSTAN CAPSTANS contain only long-matured pure Virginia Tobacco. The blend is exclusive to Capstans.   10 for 6d 20 for 1/- Also in Round Hermeti- cally Sealed Airtight Tins of 50, and in Boxes of 50 and 100.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LOUNGES and KITCHENS can serve DUAL PURPOSE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

THE KITCHEN SITTING-ROOM is the latest   innovation. It was introduced at the Ideal Home Exhibition, which was opened at the Olympia Hall, London, by Mrs. Stanley Baldwin. This exhibition is held every year, and reveals improvements in the modern home during the past year. —Air Mail photo. LOUNGES and KITCHENS can serve DUAL PURPOSE By Our Home Decorator ADVENT of flats and the less commodious dwellings that are the general rule to-day have been the means of completely altering the character of the actual rooms themselves. Kitchenettes and bed-sitting rooms, breakfast porches and sleep-out verandahs are more or less commonplaces among the amenities of life. FOR instance, it is not so long ago since every home comprised a draw- ing-room, a dining-room, and a kitchen, each entirely distinct, both in purpose and appearance. They have been super- seded by the lounge or the living room, both of which terms often cover a mul- titude of omissions. Living rooms can serve a dual...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The DEATH Scream READ THIS FIRST [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

The DEATH Scream READ THIS FIRST KATHERINE LACOMBE is staying with her uncle, Professor Philip Lacombe, an Egyptologist, with a private museum of ancient tomb relics in charge of an Arab servant, Haj Ibn Mayyud. Guests of the professor are Dr. Kyne and Stewart Merriton, who are helping him in his work. Harrison Berkely is the Professor's assistant. The household is awakened late at night by an unearthly scream. Katherine 'phones DAN CORY, son of a police sergeant, against wishes of her uncle and his friends. She overhears their conversation in which they refer to the cry as the Death Scream, a Bedouin battle cry. Cory arrives and discovers that Merriton has been found by Dr. Kyne, stabbed to death in his bedroom. The weapon is miss- ing, and the windows of the room are locked. The door is not. Cory notices hos- tility between Kyne and Katherine. As he is questioning them, the scream is heard again. He searches outside the house, and finds   marks of a boat and footprint...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
FEAST of PRIZES FOR READERS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

FEAST of PRIZES FOR READERS An avalanche of mail poured in to the offices of The Aus- tralian Women's Weekly again all the week. All of them acclaimed ihe second issue of this paper as bet- ter than the first, and the first, judging by the way it sold, was a remarkable success. 'THIS is just what The Australian Women's Weekly aims to do—to make every issue just a little better than the one before. The "Best Letter" competition was organised with this end in view. We want the constructive criticism of our readers, and are prepared to com- pensate them with prizes for the trouble they take in helping us to make The Australian Women's Weekly just what they want it to be. Last week's first prize goes to Miss Barbara Goode Matthews, 145 Macquarie Street, Sydney. Here is her letter. It is brief and to the point: "I like your Women's Weekly. It is alive and promises growth from the impetus of its kick-off. "I like best of all its humor. Lower's ludicrous sayings give a tang of salti- ness,...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
ENGAGEMENTS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

MISS JILL ILIFF, third daughter   of Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Iliff. of Lucretia Avenue, Longueville, who has announced her engagement to Mr. Clive Neely, youngest son of the late Mr. Neely and Mrs. T. H. Neely, of Hunter's Hill. MISS MARGARET GORDON, second daughter of Mr. T. S. Gordon, M.L.C., and Mrs. Gordon, of Ourimbah Road, Mosman, has announced her engage- ment to Flying-Officer R. A. Holmwood, eldest son of Mr. A. P. Holmwood and Mrs. Holmwood, of Singleton, New South Wales. Flying-Officer Holmwood is at- tached to No. 3 Squadron. Richmond. AN INTERESTING engagement just announced is that of Miss Freda Chambers, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Chambers, of Kensington, to Dr. Irwin Smith. Dr. Smith is the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Smith, of Woy Woy and Narromine. He is a graduate of the Sydney University, and is now attached to the Western Suburbs Hospital. Miss Chambers is an enthusiastic tennis player, and is a popular member of a large circle of friends...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
WEDDINGS Douglas—Thomson [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

WEDDING/ Douglas-Thomson gT. JAMES' CHURCH. King Streel was chosen for the marriage, oi June 12, of Miss Ivy Thomson only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomsor of Artarmon, to Mr. Fred Dougla4 second son ot Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Doug las. of Cremorne. The bride, who was given away by he father, wore a lovely gown of ivory ange skin velvet, showing a high neck an( long cowl sleeves. A plaited halo o silver velvet held in position the long vei of cut tulle. The bridal bouquet wa: composed of hyacinths and pink rose buds. Miss Lola Douglas and Miss Billie Williams BS bridesmaids, wore frocks of angel skin fla crepe, finished with capes of silver sequin and their hats were of the small, smart variety In matching shade. Shower bouquets of pinl carnations and mignonette made a charmin] finish. A reception was held at the New Cavalier where the mother of the bride received thi guests in a frock of black georgette and lace The mother of the bridegroom was in blacl Mtin and gold embossed lace. Singl...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

lucky! by Matt Moore HER SECOND WASHÍNG DAY ' i FINISHED THE WASH IN NO TIME TODAY I'M GLAD YOU TOLD ME   DOESN'T IT GET THE CLOTHES WHITE! AND IT'S SO SAFE FOR. COLOURED THINGS I LIKE THE WAY IT SAVES MY HANDS.TOO Extra - creamy suds quickly loosen dirt THE secret of easier washing days, and whiter washes is all in the lather. The rich creamy suds that foam up from just a little Rinso make all the difference on washing day. These lively, long- lasting Rinso suds quickly loosen the dirt—soak it out, with no need of hard rubbing at all. In a very little while you can be hanging out the whitest whites, the brightest colours you've ever had. The Rinso way of washing is just as safe as can be. Let the extra-creamy lather work for you next washing day ! A LEVER PRODUCT Creamier lather . . . more washing power

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Fairfax Musicale [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Fairfax Musicale Mrs. Walter Swinson's bright idea of reviving music as a means of entertain- ment in the home, had a high polish pot on it last Friday by the musicale given by Miss Fairfax at her residence, "Ginahgulla." HE would have been a reckless artist who dared do any musical rollicking in an atmosphere so austere, but what fun it would have been if, in response to some such mad Pied Pipering, the marble statues in the hall had stepped off their pedestals to foot a merry mod- ern measure. Diana jazzing with Apollo and the Laocoon telling his serpent to buzz off and do a spot of flirting with Eve, as he had a date with Psyche! Alas! No such bright mischief was done. Instead, Gerald Walenn, Athos Martelli and Stanley Clarkson kept their respective gifts with bow and bari- tone within classic restraints, and there was nothing in their numbers calculated to stir a quiver of protest in the hearts of the walled ancestors-in-oils. They were good numbers, though, and each of the trio...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

TO be full of pep—a-tip-toe with energy to surmount the difficulties of the day, your body must be free from poisons—clear of uric acid—unhampered by the embarrassing discomfort of constipation. The little daily dose of CARLISTA keeps you at the top of your form — clear-eyed, confident, buoyant with sheer animal spirits. That is because CARLISTA keeps the intestinal tract free from clogging poisons, clears the system of uric acid, keeps the body functioning normally and thus insures you against head- aches, bad skin, pimples, rheumatism, neuritis, and all the dread ailments that arise from an impure blood stream. Get a bottle of CARLISTA to-day and begin a new era of health and happiness. There are at least 64 average doses in a jar, so you can readily see how little it costs, to acquire this wonderful habit. CARLISTA   MINERAL SPRING SALTS LARGE JAR OBTAINABLE AT ALL CHEMISTS AND STORES Postage extra Write for Free Sample. And at WASHINGTON H. SOUL, PATTTNSON &...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

ASTHMA WONDERFUL DISCOVERY AUSTRALIA'S ASTHMA PLANT COM- POUND has proved absolutely to be Na- ture's greatest Asthma Remedy. Send stamp for long list of genuine testimonials. Bottle of 40 doses, 5/-, postage 6d, or 2 bottles 9/-, postage 1/-.   The GUARANTEED Asthma Remedy. A. WILLIAMS, 38 Burwood Rd., Burwood, N.S.W.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
BIOLOGIST Hits Back AT AUSTRALIAN Feminists [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

BIOLOGIST Hits Back AT AUSTRALIAN Feminists By DR. BURTON BRADLEY. IN the first issue of The Aus-   tralian Women's Weekly, Mrs. Linda P. Littlejohn sum- marises the pro- ceedings of the Women Voters' Federation. Among other things, she men- tions that the conference af- firmed that all positions in the Civil Service should be open to women as well as to men, that there should be equal pay for both sexes,   and that all laws, measures, or regula-   tions dealing with public morals should be so framed as not to differentiate be- tween the sexes. This attitude on the part of some rep- resentative women in our community, which insistently stresses the desirabil- ity of equal rights of the sexes in all eco- nomic, social, and moral matters, seems to me to be founded on a very incom- plete understanding of biological prin- ciples. "We cannot replace the architecture of a thousand million years' evolution in a day," says Dr. Burton Bradley, a disting...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The Romance In House Names Strange, Intriguing Stories in Them [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

The Romance In House Names Strange, Intriguing Stories in Them Lions rampant, gules, and all the jargon of heraldic lore are one way of expressing family traditions. There's another—and you need go no further than Brighton-le-Sands to see it, on the simple nameplate of a house. It is as richly symbolic as any coat-of-arms. T'HIS nameplate commemorates one Peter Moginie, an ancestor of Mrs. C. Moginie, of Brighton-le-sands, who settled in 1069 A.D. in sleepy Avencum (now known as Chezales), in Switzerland. Ever since 1740 members of the family have used this name for their homes. The Moginies claim that they can trace their descent back to B.C. 517. This fascinating story was brought to light recently by the curiosity of Miss Dorothy Vautier, one of Sydney's youngest woman an- nouncers, who wanted to know how people came to choose the names of their homes. She asked her listener friends recently to tell her the story of their house names. Here are some of the many other interesting r...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
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