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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MURDER BY A MOTHER. KILLS HEB TWO CHILDBEN AND ATTEMPTS SUICIDE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

MURDER BY A MOTHER.   KILLS HER TWO CHILDREN   AND ATTEMPTS SUICIDE.   A lady named Mrs. St. Quintin was found in her mother's house at Gray-street, Edinburgh, on November 27, with her throat cut, while her two children, one aged eight years and a half and the other eight months, were lying dead with terrible wounds in their throats, inflicted, ap- narently, with a table-knife. It is stated that during the temporary absence of her mother, Mrs. St. Quintin, who had been suffering from melancholia, killed her two child- ren, who were both boys, and then attempted to take her own life. She was removed to the Royal Infirmary. It appears that Mrs. St. Quintin returned from South Africa about six months ago. Her hus- band has been in South Africa for fourteen years, and prior to the war was an Excise officer. He was afterwards attached to the Intelligence Department of the Army, and is now resident magistrate at Vryburg. Mr. and Mrs. St. Quintin have...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Mysterious Murder. SOUTH AUSTRALIA SUPPLIES A DEMONIACAL CRIME. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A Mysterious Murder. SOUTH AUSTRALIA SUPPLIES A DEMONIACAL CRIME. A crime which has shocked the whole of   Australia, and which in its demoniacal details equals any old world horror, is that of the cold- blooded murder of Bertha Schippan (14), at Towitta, South Australia. The father and mother of the girl went away on December 27 for a short holiday. The chil- dren left at home were Bertha Elizabeth, who was murdered, and who would have been 14 years of age on January 16; Mary, 24 years; August, about 18 years; and Willie, about 15 years. The two boys slept in a shed about 100 yards from the house, and the girls shared a bed in the cottage itself. Mr. Schippan, father of the murdered girl, has been a farmer on the Murray Flats for 27 years, and has acquired a nice little property. The people around have always regarded them as a model family, sober, industrious, and affectionate. Neither Bertha nor Mary (her eldest sister) were of the flighty type.   It was...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NURSERY RHYME. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

NURSERY RHYME.   A Baron afflictcd with gout Would have no thin servants about; And they all, without fail, Drank so freely of ale That even the porter was stout. —"Smart Set."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TOASTS AND TITLES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

TOASTS AND TITLES. The after-dinner speaker who declared that, ever since public dinners were instituted, "the Navy and the Army had been enthusiastically drunk," had excellent intentions, but expressed them indifferently. Whenever Britons meet to- gether in public, and indulge in that peculiar form of entertainment known as "toasting," they never forget to honor the forces upon which the safety of the realm and the proud position of their country must largely depend. It used to be, "The Army and the Navy." Then it be- came, "The Army, the Navy, and the Reserve Forces." Later, when people began to recognise the obvious truth—forgotten, perhaps, just be- cause it was so obvious—that the navy is our first line of defence, the form of the toast be- came in a great many cases, "The Navy, the Army, and the Reserve Forces." Now, it seems about to undergo a further change, a change for which there is every- thing to be said, and against which no good reason can be alleged. At the Mansion H...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Great Bank Frauds. THE BANK OF LIVERPOOL LOSES £170,000. HOW THE FRAUDS WERE WORKED. ABBESTS AND REWARDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

Great Bank Frauds. THE BANK OF LIVERPOOL LOSES £170,000. —»— HOW THE FRAUDS' WERE WORKED. ARRESTS AND REWARDS.   One of the most extensive bank frauds of   modern times was recently committed by a clerk   in the employ of the Lank of Liverpool, who   absconded after helping to defraud the institution   of something like £170,000.   The first public intimation of this extraordinary   robbery was received by the chairman of the   Liverpool Stock Exchange, to whom the following   letter was addressed by the manager of the   bank:—   "Dear Sir,—I am desired by my board to in-   form you that through a bookkeeper in the em-   ployment of this bank the bank may lose £170,000.   "It is believed that this large sum has been   lost by him in betting transactions.—Yours faith-   ful serva...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE OLD POPE AND HIS BROTHER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE OLD POPE AND HIS BROTHER. The Christmas number of "Household Words"   has for its principal feature an article on the   Pope, by Mr. Hall Caine, which contains many   stories and sketches of the personal life of Leo   XIII.   One of the anecdotes is of special interest, as   it shows in a vivid manner the ties of kinship. Since the Italians entered Rome in 1870, the attitude of the Vatican has been one of protest against the power which has arrogated its sove- reignty. One form of this protest has been the absolute retirement of the Pope within the limits of his ex-territorial domain. It is held by the Catholic party that for the Pope to go out of the Vatican for an hour, or for even so short a journey as the width of the Piazza of St. Peter's, would be to compromise his claim, to acknow- ledge the supremacy of the usurping King, and to expose himself to the insults of an unbelieving and rebellious pop...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INTERESTING GENEALOGIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

INTERESTING GENEALOGIES. Among the 311 descendants of King Charles II. of England and Nell Gwynne are the Duke of St. Albans, the Countess of Warwick, Lord Rosslyn, and the Duchess of Sutherland. The Duke of Richmond is descended from Charles Lennox, the first Duke of Richmond, who was the illegitimate son of Charles II. and Louise de Quercuaille, a French woman, sent over to Eng- land by Louis XIV. of France, and created Duchess of Portsmouth by her royal lover. The Duke of Grafton is descended from the first Duke of Grafton, who was the illegitimate son of Charles II. and Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland. The Earl of Munster bears the royal arms with the bar sinister to indicate his irregu- lar descent from King William IV. and Mrs. Jor- dan, the actress, all of whose nine illegitimate sons and daughters were well provided for, while their unfortunate mother was brutally discarded, and allowed to die in great poverty and dis- tress.—Portland (Or.) "Oregonian."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW TO KILL RATS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

HOW TO KILL RATS. Lisbon has been suffering from a pest of rats, for which the general antidote of cats, traps, and poison proved abortive. As a last resource bacilli were employed, and the municipal doctors were commissioned to inoculate some rats with an infectious disease. A suitable virus, harm- less to man, was found, a few rats captured and inoculated, and then released. The experiment proved a great success, for the bacilli rapidly spread and the rats died with wonderful ra- pidity, so that in a very short time the city was freed from the rodents. It is now proposed to clear vessels from rats in the same way.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DEVELOPMENT OF TELEGBAPHY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

DEVELOPMENT OF TELEGRAPHY. The enormous strides that have attended the   development of telegraphy during the nineteenth   century are strikingly illustrated by some sta-   tistics recently issued by Sir W. H. Preece,   K.C.B., late electrician to the English Post-office.   In 1870 the number of words transmitted per   minute was only 80; in 1890 the number had been   increased to 450. In 1870, 9,850,177 messages   were despatched throughout the United King-   dom, at a cost of 3,061,505 dollars, while in 1900   89,576,961 telegrams were sent, bringing in a   revenue of 17,296,765 dollars. The total number   of Government and private cables encircling the   globe is at present 1624, covering a total length   of 187,353,172 nautical miles.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TREMENDOUS STRENGTH OF THE BEETLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

TREMENDOUS STRENGTH OF THE BEETLE.       Scientists have been telling us that insects are proportionately much stronger than animals. The beetle furnishes a striking illustration of this, for if it were possible to get one two-thirds the size of a horse 12 full-grown horses would in vain contend in pulling against it.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE "HACTRESS." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE "HACTRESS."   Pantomime Child (to admiring friend): "Yus,   and there's another hadvantage in bein' a hac-   tress. You get yer fortygraphs took for   noffink!"     The United States has now the third largest     Hebrew population of any country in the world.       One in every 70 is a Jew.    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE OLDEST SHIP AFLOAT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE OLDEST SHIP AFLOAT. A ship dating back to the time of Christopher Columbus, yet still sailing the seas, may well be considered a curiosity after a life of several centuries. The Anita, as the caravel is called, is, oddly enough, engaged in the carrying trade between Spain and the United States. She re- cently went to Baltimore with a cargo of Spanish wines and other articles of a non-perishable character, and has started on her return voyage to Spain. It goes without saying that she has been frequently repaired during the course of her   life, but the original style has always been pre-   served, and she still presents the high bow and stern and the elaborate carvings of the old days.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BRITISH NAVAL GUNNERY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

BRITISH NAVAL GUNNERY. The Channel Squadron, which has been en- gaged in prize-firing at Portland since the Ophir's return, has dispersed, and will not as- semble again until the crews have had Christ- mas leave. The official return of the firing with the heavy guns was made known just before the last mail left London. At times the weather was rough, while the ships had also to contend with such disadvan- tages as thick and hazy atmosphere and bad light, all of which conditions were unfavorable to good shooting. The battleship Mars appears to have done best with her four 12-in. guns. She made 11 hits in 26 rounds, or over 42 per cent. The other ships each fired their four 12-in. guns, and the record was: Magnificent—23 rounds and 7 hits. .Majestic—22 rounds, 7 hits. Hannibal—22 rounds, 6 hits. Jupiter—20 rounds, 6 hits. Prince George—26 rounds, 6 hits. With the 13-in. guns the Repulse scored 10 hits in 25 rounds, and the Resolution 9 hits in 28 rounds. The firing with the 6-in. guns...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MOTOR CORN MILL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

MOTOR CORN MILL. A French idea is a motor mill to follow armies,   grinding the wheat or other grain of the country   traversed.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Tragedy in Paris. WIFE AND LOVER SHOT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

Tragedy in Paris. WIFE AND LOVER SHOT. That brilliant and fashionable district around the Opera in Paris was the scene of a startling crime about 11 o'clock on the morning of No- vember 26, when a jealous husband fired at his wife and her lover, killing the latter dead. Strangely enough, this terrible tragedy was enacted not very far from the place where the Comtesse de Cornulier was shot dead by her husband as she was leaving the office of her legal adviser, who had a narrow escape on the occa- sion. The Cornulier drama happened on Novem- ber 17, 1900, or a little over a year back, in the Rue de Provence, which is hardly a stone's throw from the Opera. The tragedy of Novem- ber 26 took place right in front of the National Academy of Music. The affair was briefly described by the police- man who was regulating the traffic at the corner of the Boulevard des Capucines and the Place de l'Opera. He had only just stopped the flow of cabs, carts, and carriages, when he saw a rather unkemp...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AT THE GATES OF THE ORIENT. A SHEREEFIAN REVIEW. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

AT THE GATES OF THE ORIENT.     A SHEREEFIAN REVIEW. The Sultan of Morocco held a review of his   regular cavalry in the great square of the palace   at Marakesh recently. No more fitting sur-   roundings for such a typically Oriental scene   could be imagined (writes a correspondent of   "The Times" who witnessed the scene). The   square is enclosed by high turreted walls of   white and yellow, above which appear the gorge-   ous green roofs of the palace buildings and the   tops of olive, palm, and cypress trees, while,   towering far into the sky beyond, are the snow   peaks of the Atlas Mountains. The cavalry,   numbering some thousands, were drawn up   on two sides of the square, leaving a wide open   space down the centre.   At 9 o'clock the Sultan entered the...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AMBITION IN GAOL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

  AMBITION IN GAOL.   "Yes, we get into county gaols occasionally,"   says an American tramp, "but the trouble is,   they don't keep us long enough. A gaol is a   homelike place, with plenty to eat, no work,   and good treatment. We are generally sentenced   for three months, but after about four weeks, the   sheriff picks out three or four of us. and says:   " 'Now, boys, them iron bars on that window   is loose, and it's going to be a dark night. Hev   some ambition about you.'   "An old tramp knows what that means, and he   is ten miles away before daylight. A greenhorn   reckons to stay on, and next morning the sheriff   comes in and finds him there, and says:   " ' What, ain't you got no ambition? Then   I'll give you some!' And he boots him out into &n...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IN CONSIDERATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

IN CONSIDERATION. Delighted Client: "I understand you have won   damages for me."   Lawyer: "Yea, sir; ten pounds."   Delighted Client: "Good! What is your fee?"   Lawyer: "In view of the small damages award-   ed. I will reduce my fee to twenty guineas."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GAIETY GIRL AND WINE MERCHANT. END OF A ROMANCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

GAIETY GIRL AND WINE MERCHANT.   END OF A ROMANCE.   In the London Sheriff's Court, on November   22, an interesting breach of promise case was   heard. The parties to the action were Miss   Louisa Dora Leaver, of Ilford (plaintiff) and   Mr. George Geoffrey Edwards, a wine merchant,   of Colchester (defendant). Mr. Salter appeared   as counsel for Miss Leaver, the defendant being   neither present nor legally represented.   The opening statement showed that the plain-   tiff was formerly upon the stage, and had played   a prominent part in Mr. George Edwardes' com-   panies, touring with "The Shop Girl," "My   Girl," and "The Geisha." In the early part of   1899 the defendant and plaintiff (the former   being also in the company) became acquainted.   The acquaintan...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OTHER WORLDS. THE PLANET VENUS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

OTHER WORLDS. THE PLANET VENUS. (BY "G.B." FOR "THE WORLD'S NEWS.") During the early part of last year the visit of the King's son was marked by the appearance of a magnificent comet in our western evening sky; and the birthday of the King of Kings, this Christmas, is coincident with the presence in the same quarter of the heavens of an exceed- ingly bright and beautiful planet. So dazzling its lustre, that even the brightness of the sun during the hours of daylight fails to obliterate it, and it may be seen on any clear day by anyone who knows its exact position in the heavens. The writer has seen it, and pointed it out to others, several afternoons during the past month. After sunset the refulgent lamp shines with brilliance so great that an opaque object inter- cepted between it and a white background will cast a distinct shadow. The planet has, during the whole of last year, been coming gradually into view as an evening star, increasing in brightness, and in angular distance fro...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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