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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

109 THE MINER'S NOVENA, AND WHAT CAME OF IT. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. "Mary," called Mrs. Treherne from the top of the stairs,, "Do you know what time it is ? Nearly seven o'clock; and the chapel will be crowded to-night, as Father Gerald is going to preach. Come up at once, child, and put on your things." "Very well, mother, I'll come if you wish it; but indeed I've no heart, you know, for going to-night," answered Mary, loth to leave the kitchen fire, by which she sat. "Nonsense. It will do you good to go; and maybe you'll find there the strength you so sorely need to bear your cross, Mary dear." Thus urged, Mary rose with a sigh to do her mother's bidding. But, as she had said, she had no heart for going out that evening, not even to the chapel. She had been to High Mass that morning, and the news which she had heard on her way home had filled her with grief and anxiety. Mary Treherne was twenty years of age; a comely, rosy-cheeked, bright eyed young woman; the only child of a widowe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

"T?,?"j t ;,"'5!ep"ipwP! 110 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. wait for j'ou if it were twenty years, for I could never love another. But oh! how I wish you could get work here; it is hard," cried the poor girl, unable to control her emotion. And John thought so too, if the tear that glistened in his eye as he shook hands with Mary at her cottage gate, spoke truly. No wonder the girl's heart was heavy that day: it was the first time her lover had ever hinted at the probability of having to go away. She knew how bad the times then were in Cornwall; that mines were stopping all around, so that hundreds of men were out of employ ment. But John was still engaged, and so long as he was at work she had thought there was the hope of some thing good turning up. But now that even his Uncle Peter had decided that it was better to start for America while they had still money enough to pay their passage out, she saw that it would be useless to oppose John's going. Mrs. Treherne and her daughter managed to r...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

'PWrlfJTgPPPtl!lPIIWPiiil,li' i; "''," j " i- ' ttl''?'-T-y.yBi THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ill old bargain closes and new ones are agreed to is called setting-day, which is generally payday also, the men being paid at the end of the month for the work done during the four weeks since the previous pay-day. Uncle Peter and his nephew were working together a pitch or piece of ground on tribute at fifteen shillings in the pound that is, for every pound's worth of metal they raised and made ready for sale they would receive fifteen shillings. This would have been a high tributo if there had been much mineral in their ground, but it was known to be very poor. The captains and overseers had been anxious to have all the ground explored, because, according to certain calculations, there ought to be a good lode somewhere thereabout. There was a rich vein of ore on the level above, and the captains, feeling confident that there must be more below, had offered the high tribute to induce some one to s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

112 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. won't you ? It can be no good to go on any longer like this." "No; I have determined to try it on another month or two," replied Peter in such a quiet firm tone that his wife knew well that it would be useless to urge him further; and when she put into his hand the little packet contain ing his dinner, he surprised her not a little by saying, "You can boil that ham you have in pickle, Sarah, for to morrow's dinner, and don't be afraid. I expect there will be another coming sooner than you imagine." When he arrived at the mine, he went down as usual with John, who had come straight from Mass. There was the hard granite rock on the north side opposite where they worked, looking as he had seen it in his dream. "What are you going to do to-day, uncle?" asked John. "Have you had any answer yet to our novena do you think?" "Yes, I believe I have, and so I am gaing to take again, and shall drive in here on the north side " "What?" cried John. "I hope you are not in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

A THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. llfj "Eighteen shillings!" repented the mained as unshaken as ever; and, captain in a tone of surprise. Don't encouraged by his example, the others you want the pitch again? Fifteen felt they could not draw back. Mary shillings you know is our highest Traherne, who had passed a most price." anxious week, went with John and his "Cappcn," replied Peter, ' 'tis a poor uncle to Holy Communion next mom piece of ground as it is, and no good to ing, after which they spent the day us at that price. But if you will lotus together more calm and trustful, go four men for two months, we'll take On the Monday it was Peter and it at your price, and put in a bit of ' John's turn to work the afternoon core, cross-cut north.'' when, just as John was beating the "Do you mean in that piece of hard, borer that his uncle held in his hands, rocky ground ?" ask :cl the captain in ' the latter cried out, "Hold!" astonishment. "What's the matter?" said John. "Yes, cappon," answered Pe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

114 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. return 'thanks: our novena is ended, our prayer is granted." The lode turned out rich beyond all expectation proving, as Peter had called it, a very lane of ore." The joyful news was soon carried to Mary Treherne, and most thankful was John to abandon the idea of going to America. So diligently did they all work the next seven weeks of the en gagement that a good sum of money was handed over to each on the next two setting days. John took a small farm, and devoted part of his earnings to the purchase of stock and the im provement of the place. He had a natural taste for farming, but had never till now had the chance of follow ing it out. In a few months the day was fixed for his marriage, and it was arranged that Mrs. Treherne should give up her cottage and live with her daughter. The evening before the wedding Mary and John went to see Peter and his wife, when the good old man told them of his dream, which they had not yet heard, for he was a man of few wor...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

mmmmtm'm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, 115 chew up herbs and blow them on the patient. The successful doctor first imbues his patient with much supersti tion and keeps him or her as ignorant as possible. The so-called music of a tom-tom is very weird and dismal, and very much out of place in a sick room. The Indian doctor, when treating a patient, paints himself in dazzling colors, and arrays his body in fantastic garments and furbelows, which are dosigned to, in a measure, increase the awe inspired by his presence at the bedside of his stricken brethren. The part played by medicine men in war or on raiding expeditions is an important one, for to them is attributed the suc cess or failure of the foray. The fact that their predictions usually conform rather closely to the information ought in by scouts does not appear to excite suspicion in the minds of the warriors, or lessen, in their opinion, the supernatural power of the conjurers. Medicine men are aware that white physicians use a black ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

mvmammmmmmmmm 11G THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. THE KIOWA-APACHE. A small tribe of the Athapascan stock, calling themselves Naisha, and popularly known as Apache or Kiowa Apache, has been associated with the Kiowa as far back as the traditions of either tribe go. While retaining their distinct language, they nearly all speak and understand Kiowa, and form a component part of the Kiowa camping circle. In dress and general habits of life they are in no way distinguishable. They have come from the north with the Kiowa, and are mentioned under the name of Cataka as living in the Black Hills country in 1S05. La Salle speaks of them under the name of Cat tacka as early as 1681. There is no reason to suppose that they ever formed a part of the Apache proper of Arizona and New Mexico, but are probably, like the Sarsi, a distinct Athapascan people who have always lived cast of the mountains, and who having been obliged by weakness of numbers to unite themselves with a stronger tribe, have since share...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

v v ' A .'jfatf t & h THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. J17 Wash i la and Rod rivers in south western Oklahoma and numbered J ,0 17 in L893. ' The Kiowa do not have the gentile system, and thero is no restriction as to intermarriage among the divisions. They have six tribal divisions, includ ing the Apache associated with them, who form a component part of the Kiowa camping circle. Although brave and warlike, the Kiowa are considered inferior in most respects to the Co manche. In person they are dark and heavily built, forming a marked con trast to the more slender and brighter eomplexioned prairie tribes farther north. Their language is full of chok ing and nasal sounds and is not well adapted to rhythmic composition, for which reason they frequently use the Arapahoe songs in the Ghost dance, without any clear idea of the meaning or correct pronunciation, although they have a number of songs of their own. THE COMANCHE INDIANS. The Comanche aire one of the South ern tribes of the Shoshonoan ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

mmmmmmm mmmmmgmmm -frr -"'P ' J7"""r f 118 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. had others in former times. Of these all but five are practically extinct. The Comanche were nomad buffalo hunters, constantly on the move, culti vating nothing from the ground, and living in skin tepees. Excepting that they are now confined to a reservation and forced to depend on government rations, they are but little changed from their original condition. They arc still for the most part living in tepees of canvass and are dressed in buckskin. They wore long noted as the finest horsemen of the plains, and bore a reputation for dash and courage. They have a high sense of honor, and hold themselves superior to the other tribes with which they are associated. In person they are well built and rather corpulent. Their language is the trade language of the region, and is more or less understood by all the neighboring tribes, it is sonorous and Mowing, it's chief characteristic being a rolling r. It has no I. Their present...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

T TSTZZZSZ 51 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 110 sician and is a man of unquestionable courage. At the battle of Wounded Knee Creek durirlg the last Sioux war lie was in the thickest of the fight and saved the livos of soveral men who would have bled to death had it not been for the prompt medical assistance rendered by him. In the fight he was wounded six times, three times severely, but continued his work until all the wounded soldiers had been taken to the hospital or otherwise cared for. Father (J raft has had an eventful career. Tie served throughout the ten year' war, as a Cuban ollicer, entering the Cuban army as a captain of artillery. He gradually rose to the rank of general, which rank he held at the close of the war. He is, therefore, well acquainted with Cuba and the work that would naturally fall to the lot of his party. The five sisters, being of Indian blood, are accustomed to lives of hard ship ami privation, and would unques tionably be able to render more effective assistanc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

t 120 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. . I t The first Governor and Chief Justice of Maryland was Loonard Calvert a Catholic. The first missionary in Maryland was Andrew White, Jesuit. The discoverer of the Upper Missis sippi and the apostle of the valley of that river was the Jesuit, James Mar quette. The Ohio river was first discovered by De la Salle, a Catholic. The first Catholic Governor of New York was Thomas Cogan, an Irishman. His commission bears date of Septem ber 30, 1082. The founder of San Francisco was the Catholic missionary Junipero Sorra, a Franciscan. The founder of the American navy was John Barry, a Cntholic. The commander of the cavalry in the Revolutionary war was Stephen Moylan, a Catholic. The first newspaper in America that gave accurate reports of the Legislature debates was established by Matthew Carey, a Catholic. Thomas Fitzsimmons, Pennsylvania's signer of the Declaration of Independ ence, was a Catholic. Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, whose signature on the same ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

. V-"" "" ' " '"WfT 'HE TNI) I AN ADVOCATE. 121 Te jp2el of purgatory. How many sweet reminiscences this title recalls to a Christian mind. 4f i". FOR LOVED ONES DEPARTED, One hour with Thee in silent adoration, In the dim quiet of Thy Holy Place, Pleading lor them who wait in desolation, Craving the pity oi' Thy Sacred Face. What joy, e'en though in .sorrow, thus to be One little hour, my God, with them and Thee. One hour with Thee one short and precious hour, Snatched from the rush and clamor of the day. 0, may Thy mercy rain in plenteous shower Upon their upturned faces while I pray, Making all things this side of death to seem A vain illusion, an unhappy dream. One hour with Thee it is the old, old fashion, Hand clasped in theirs, I eeek the Sacred Heart. Unlock the bounty of Thy sweet companion, Keaoh down Thy hands and take them where Thou art! If still my loved ones suffer, set them free In this one hour, my God! this hour with Thee! Mmj E. Munnh'. THE CATHOLIC DOCTRINE OF PU...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

mrnmmimmmzi9zaxirmBammx!mmri 122 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, teaching of Purgatory to the faithful, as wo had fallen upon times, when men would not endure sound doctrine. Purgatory is that state in which the souls of the faithful, who have departed this life in the state of sanctifying grace, but still subject to temporal punishment of sin, must expiate such punishment by suffering. These souls are benefited and relieved by the pray ers and good works of the faithful on earth and especially by the Holy Sacri fice of the Mass. Though the name Purgatory is some times used to signify the abode of the souls departed, yet it is more univer sally and appropriately applied to the state and condition of these souls. Furthermore we say that these souls expiate the temporal punishment of sin, because this is the more correct and accurate expression according to the teaching of theologians and doctors of the Church. We shall have occasion later on to discuss the opinions of theologians and others con...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

"w -ww v,"r'" l'F I' -WflMPW'PW'PV" H. TITE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 12.3 directly rolatod to the doctrine of Pur gatory, is that "On the Last End of Man." Therefore Purgatory is treated of in most theological text books in the chapter "On the Last Things," the "Novissima." We might call Purga tory the connecting link between time and eternity. The souls departed are still in a condition to render satisfac tion for their sins by sufFering, similarly as we on earth. They live as we do in a condition of faith and hope, and have not yet reached their final destiny. In a certain sense we may still say of them that they are "viatores" way farers. On the other hand, these souls are no longer able to gain any merit, because the time of meriting ends with death. Furthermore the souls in Purgatory are no longer in danger of falling away from their eternal destiny, because a special protection of God preserves them from sin. Because theso souls are separated from the body, their knowledge and activit...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

ammmmmmmmmmmmBmmmmmmmmmmmm -rw -"Wwum" ' " 124 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. teachers in the Church of Christ, commonly called theologians. ) , from the teaching of sound reason, which is always in harmony with the teaching of revelation, and g) , from tho dictate of the human heart, which is evidenced even in the opinions and practices of thobo outside of the Catholic Church, who thus prove the truth of the saying that the soul of man is by nature Christian. Whilst we theoretically argue tho truth of Purgatory for non-Catholics let us strengthen and actuate our own faith by a zealous and earnest practico of this devotion to tho souls departed. Nothing will more easily dispel all indiU'erence to this article of faith and open up for us sources of purer joy or more abundant consolation. THE END OF MAN. S' I. 0 seers and pages ! ye have read Unnumbered volumes through, And knowledge hides his head With you. Deep-pondering and far-seeing, Ye know the mystery of this being, Its origin and end. T...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of the Indian Missions. Vol. XI. JANUARY, 1899. No. 1. LAFAYETTE IN AMERICA AND FRANCE. By OiiAiUii:s J. O'Malley. Plutarch, in his estimate of the character of Sylla, recites as his chief glory the merit of having preferred the public good to his own. In our day, contemplating the career of the Roman hero, his craft, ambition and vindictiveness, it is difficult to allow the historian's praise justly bestowed. Perhaps to Washington, alone among statesmen, it can be conscientiously awarded, and after Washington to La fayette. Yet we submit that a close analysis of the character of the two men most prominently identified with the American Revolution would reveal an impassible gulf a mighty chasm between the French hero and the American patriot. Removed from the close of Lafayette's career by now nearly three-fourths of a century, it remains true that a correct understand ing of his motives is yet impossible. Our civilization 'is too deeply...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. saint, but his visions possessed the same universal scope. Man, wherever he existed, was his brother. He would make earth free and pure and happ'. Could he have had his will he would have restored the Golden Age, or brought into existence a millenium, gleams of which only in dim glimpses are caught, now and then, by loftiest poets, philosophers and saints. It has been the policy of many of his biographers to assert that Lafayette derived his ideas of liberty from a study of the infidel philosophers of the last century. This analysis is essen tially untrue. Ideas of liberty, as world-embracing as those of Lafayette, existed back in the very ages of faith. They were even held by some of the foremost doctors of the church, as the germ of the American Constitution lay imbedded in the profound mind of St. Thomas Aquinas centuries before the existence of Thomas Jefferson. And Lafaj'ette himself in his life-long strug gle against the oppressors and in favor of the oppr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

hxphp up mn ,. ip ii THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 3 tho Chateau do Chavagnac, in the province of Auvergne, in the central part of the southern division of France, on September G, 1757. Tho chateau was distant one hundred and twenty leagues from Paris, situated in the midst of a picturesque and moun tainous region. Buildod in 1701, on the ruins of one that had for centuries been a family residence, it command ed a fine view of tho surrounding peaks. If "in the mountain-places Liberty hath her habitation," here it was that the future "heroic defender of liberty in two hemispheres," first made her acquaintance. We feel, too, that to his mother he owes much. Full of ardent piety, she possessed the same loftiness of soul, generosity, and scorn of a lie and a liar, which distin guished her son in after years. She was a widow, her husband, a colonel in the French army, having fallen in the battle of Minden. There was intense affection between mother and son. As a child he was frail and sickly, and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1899

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE- L V eyes flashed, his chest expanded, and suddenly he startled the faculty by reaching his peroration in a rush, de scribing the perfect courser as "one who, on perceiving a whip, threw down the rider." He lost the prize, nor did he seem to regret it. Ho had spoken out of his soul declaring that oppres sion was odious. At seventeen he was married to the Comptesse Anastasie de Noailles. In the France of that day early marriages were believed in and practiced in high life and low. His wife stands out in history scarcely less distinct than he. Her courage, piety, virtue and conjugal affection have won her a place among the heroines of the century. Added to these gifts, her own fortune was large. The joint revenue of Lafayette and his wife at this period was 200,000 francs per annum. Notwithstanding his marriage, he still kept his post in the French army, and unflinchingly submitted to the routine of review and drill and march and discipline. He regarded all this as...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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