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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 31 July 1920

in^r this country, a record kept of their ac tivities and furnished to the court when application for citizenship is made. 21. The time has come when the immi gration of Asiatics should cease. 22. No alien should hold land except under a lease limited to one year, and should nol be permitted to hold stock in any land corporation. 2'A. State hospitals connected with the insane asylums should provide medical treat ment For drug addicts. They should he made self-supporting. The jail is no place for such mentally diseased persons, hut it is the place for those who sell the drugs. 24. Hospitals for the insane can and should partially pay for their maintenance. Two-thirds of the inmates can do some work, and should, as some useful occupa tion will soothe their minds and tend to final cure. The inmates should he seyre iratcd according to their mental and physi cal conditions. 'J;">. The penitentiary and reformatory can and should be made self-sustaining. Prisoners should be taught a use...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 August 1920

Ga^^k^^ee^^ '^^^^ PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEF.KLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE ROSCOB CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 3579 Office 317 22nd Aye. South ABOUT JAPANESE IMMIGRATION One Terrace of Orillia, Washington, urges importation into the country of a million Japanese laborers to be employed in clear ing for agricultural uses large areas of logged-oil:' timber land in the Northwest — the laborers to be returned to their homes when the special job shall be done. This proposal is not likely to find acceptance, yet there is something to be said for it. For this particular work there is no avail able supply of domestic labor; and even if domestic labor were to be had, it could not profitably be employed at ruling rates of wages. Only by cheap labor is it practic able to clear an...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 August 1920

POLITICAL POT PIE Win With Warren!— Joel F. Warren, Re publican candidate for sheriff, is making his campaign for the office on promises of economical administration of the office and systematic policing of the county. "Efficiency and economy in police work go hand in hand," says Mr. Warren. "Dur ing my thirty-six years of experience as a police officer, I have found that men skilled in peace officer work perform difficult tasks with less than half the number required by less experienced officers. At the present time the sheriff's office is using men and money in a needless duplication of work done by the Seattle police department. This practcie will be done away with if I am elected." Mr. Warren comes of old revolution ary stock. He traces his lineage direct to General Joseph Warren whose name was immortalized in American history when he was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill because he stubbornly re fused to retreat. Ilis father was born in North Carolina, his mother in West Virg...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 August 1920

Senator French, the father of the many anti-marriage bills that have been put up to the legislature of this state from time to time, is in Seattle and is raving like a mad dog in a thunder storm in his en deavor to convince the voters that he is the right man for lieutenant governor. French has traveled in the legislature with the I tickle you and you tickle me class, who have wished upon the taxpayers of this state more vicious legislation than a dozen honest legislatures can relieve them of. With Lamping as governor and French as lieutenant governor, Harding of Geor gia and Vardeman of Mississippi would be a thousand times more acceptable. Under a Republican governor no colored man in the state of Washington has ever held an appointive position either from the governor or any appointee of the gov ernor and that too despite the fact the colored men have all but unanimously voted the Republican ticket. It remained for a Democratic governor, Ernest Lister, to cause one of his appoint...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 7 August 1920

what in the damnation is this? She is now more Btrongly fixed in her efficacy of prayer belief, but says, the next time I pray to be woke up I will add, but do not do it with a cold shower bath. • # # Last Wednesday was red letter day for the Seattle Branch of the National Asso ciation for the Advancement of Colored People as it acted as hostess for between 500 ;tiul 1000 persona at Fortuna Park where a picnic was hold. I do not think I ever mcl a more pleasing crowd, every one of whom enjoyed himself or herself every moment he was in the park. Community dinners were spread where friends of long standing renewed former pleasant relations. Jones and his bunch sold goo.d barbecued meat a 1 two bits a smell and I hear it was all smelt away. Winston was pate keeper and the lady that had a poodle got real mad when she had to pay for it entering the park, but Winston informed her that he had no more respect for a dog than he did for a human. Joe Warren, candidate for sheriff, also peeped ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 August 1920

@agtfcft&^Me&fifa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE ROSCOE CATTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 3579 Office 317 22nd Aye. South PLAIN TALK In his speech accepting formally the Re publican nomination for the Presidency, Sen ator Harding, on July 22nd last, had the fol lowing to say with reference to the problem most particularly interesting and all import ant to our people: 1' I believe the Federal Government should stamp out lynching and remove that stain from the fair name of America." "I beileve he Negro citizens of America should be guaranteed the enjoyment of all their rights, that they have earned the full measure of citizenship bestowed, that their sacrifices in blood on the battlefields of the Republic have entitled them to all of free dom ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 August 1920

THE PASSING THRONG Some one handed me a folder one day this week which was issued by Ed. T. ('oman. candidate for the Repubican gubernatorial nominal ion, and here are some of the pertin ent points thereof: Agriculture is the foundation of our na tional greatness and we should encourage and foster the development of improved farming methods and devote our time, energy and money to aiding the fanner in working out his marketing problems so that the producer will receive a fairer share of what the con sumer pays. We must conserve the great natural resources of our soil and reclaim the thousands of unimproved acres lying within ■our borders. Education is the surest guaranty of good government. Educate the youth of today along the right lines and we need have no fear for the government of tomorrow. Tf the present school revenues were raised on some uniform plan and the proceeds equitably dis tributed in accordance with the needs, the schools can be properly supported without materially ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 August 1920

is now conneced with Ed. T. Coman's gubernatorial campaign and she is again showing her cleverness as a politician. "You were a loyal friend of Gov. Mead and I believe if you would get acquainted with Mr. Coman you would soon be just as loyal to him for he, like yourself, is absolutely loyal to his friends. From what I have seen of Sena tor Coman he is not much on the bullcon, but he is strong on the square and in the open plaform. He will do exactly what he prom ises to do, but he will promise to do nothing that he thinks is not on the square and in the open, and that, in my opinion, he would not do even at this time, though to not do so would cost him his opportunity of being nominated on the Republican ticket for the state's chief executive." Next Sunday afternoon John F. Miller will address the members of the King County Re publican Club a its place of meeting, 21st and Jefferson and President Cooper is desir ous that a full house be on hand to greet him. The club will hold a bu...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 14 August 1920

STOLEN FROM THIEVES "Kivers," said the Aineriean, "why your riven are nothing to ours. Compared with our Hudson and Mississippi, your Mersey, Severn, and Thames are sleepy, sickly streams." "Oh, come!" protested the Eng lishman, "I think your rivers are just as sickly as ours." "How do you make that out?" "Well, they are all confined to their beds," replied the visitor. General Peyton C. Harch said at a dinner in Philadelphia, apropos of a military argu ment: "It is hard to argue with our oppon ents. They are more unreasonable than the lady who missed the train. 'We wouldn't have missed it,' the lady's husband growled, 'if you hadn't been so long in dressing.' 'Yes,' she said, 'and if you hadn't hurried me so, we wouldn't have such a long wait now tor the next.'" To the rear door of the house of a lonely spinster in a Pennsylvania town there re cently came a seedy-looking person who, after being given some food, made so bold as to proffer this additional request: "Missus,ask your hu...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 August 1920

@atf£cfi& PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year In advance. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 3579 Office 317 22nd Aye. South THE CARLYON ROAD BILL Perhaps the Carlyon road bill is drawing too heavily on the future or, better yet, drawing too heavily on the present in the interest of the future, but at that, as we see it it will prove to be not only a profit able, but a priceless investment. Of course it is on the installment plan, —enjoy the article while you pay for it, —but it means the rapid development of the resources of the state almost immediately after the com peltion of the proposed highway, whereas, on the other hand, to sit idly by until we have the money in the bank to pay as we go for highway building the present gen eration even to the cradle...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 August 1920

THE PASSING THRONG "You tell me there are two papers pub lished in this city by colored men and yet 1 see neither of the editors here. Tell them to come to se,e me before 1 leave, as 1 want to subscribe lor their papers," said Bishop Fountain in his address on Monday evening. At least (»ne of the editors was present, but no provision had been made for either of them to get in touch with the Bishop and the one present was not even able to get a seat at the banquet table where he could get first handed what was being said by the distinguished and learned speakers of the occasion. Bishop Fountain's words were a severe rebuke to the spirit of this community in frequently overlooking- the press in public functions. It may sat isfy a sellish and sinister motive to over look the press but it's a splendid example 01 cutting off your nose to spite your face. Sensible newspaper men have no desire to be lionized, but they do expect common courtesy and the community that does not accord them th...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 August 1920

CHARLES ETHELBERT CLAYPOOL Candidate for the Non-Partisan Nomi nation for Superior Court Judge or less gush I am convinced that his annual visits to the Northwest will result in in spiring those he comes to visit to strike for a higher level of life and become more es sential to the growth of the community, and cease to be parasites looking always for some charitable hand, to feed them. Representing the local Elk lodge B. F. Tutt left for Kansas City last Monday evening to attend the session of the Grand Lodge. After the adjournment of the Grand Lodge he will journey to New York, Washington City and other Atlantic ports. # # * C. A. Davis of Everett was seen on the streets of Seattle one day this week and when I met him he made no bones in declar ing to me, "I am looking for you with blood in my eyes, and all because you seem to be overlooking our candidate for gov ernor. The colored citizens of Everett are deeply interested in Col. Hartley's con didaey and they are likewise deeply ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 21 August 1920

ployers' Association, that with the year ending November 15, ]!>l7, they had placed about 10,00(1 Negro workers. Questionnaires sent to 111 firms in Now York City employing more than 500 per sons showed thai more than 2 per cent of the larger industrial firms make use of Negro workers. Many more showed a fa vorable attitude. The United Dressed Beef Company has recently introduced colored workers and when questioned, replied that thei resrvices were absolutely "<). K." The American Druggist Syndicate of Long Island City affirms that the work, and also the behavior, of Negro workers is very good. The New York Times, as well as the New Yoik World, are entirely satisfied with their colored employees. The former stat ing, in answer to our questions that ''Ne groes are good workers and should be schooled Tor all kinds of work." The sit Million and attitude is well gummed up by the Washburn Wire Company, Inc., who write: "The Negro workers in our factories are very satisfactory and t...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 August 1920

€ju//v/i&JzejeAfa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year In advance. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, ""Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 3579 Office 317 22nd Aye. South AS HE IS (By William Howard Taft) A trip through the South develops the pleasant fact that the Negroes of that sec tion have shared in tis general prosperity. They are better clothed, they are better fed than they were before the war. Whether the immigration of large numbers to the North has impressed the whites of the South with the need of their continued presence, one can not say, but that they occupy a somewhat better standing in the community than they did before seems ap parent to the casual observer. There is one circumstance in the situation, how- ever, which is disquieting. The South voted for prohibition, both by ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 August 1920

W. W. CONNER Republican Candidate for Lieutenant Governor W. W. Conner, former Speaker of the House, now Re publican candidate for Lieutenant Governor, has had ten years experience in the Washington Legislature. He was first elected to the House in 1011 from La Conner, Skagit County, and served as Speaker of the House in 1015 and now desires to succeed himself as Speaker of the Senate. He is the son of one of Washington's oldest families and considered by his friends as the best known and qualified of the candidates for the position of Lieutenant Governor of this State. He made an enviable record as a Legislator and has been an ardent advocate of all laws pertaining to the advancement and up building of this State. THE PASSING THRONG The withdrawal of Elmer F. Connor from the race for county auditor to an extent simplified the situation. As it now appears the fight is between A. Lincoln Smith and <). M. Spear witli 1). E. Ferguson kinder holding the balance of power. Ferguson see...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 August 1920

Mrs. John P. Mapps of Spokane spent a few days in the city the past week in the advocacy of one of the many aspiring poli ticians of the state, who is trying to con vince the dear people that he's alright. Mrs. Mapps is a forceful talker and always makes a good impression. EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS Jim Cox got pinched for speeding and he will get skinned for running. "Brew at home and raise hell abroad," will be the outcome of Bob Saunders' wet decision. Rev. Allen of Taeoma visited Seattle last Thursday evening and talked with the politicians. Tennessee's legislature gave the women the full right of suffrage in this country, but. made a damphool of itself afterwards. Evidently the Concrete Trust controlled the late Good Roads Convention as it went on record endorsing the Carlyon Road Bill. Mayor Caldwell may fly to Everett and even to Olympia, but it will be a cold day in August when he flies into the governor's office as the state's chief executive. No one has as yet aeused William How...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 28 August 1920

STOLEN FROM THIEVES There was not even standing room in the crowded electric ear, but one more passenger, a young woman, wedged her way along just inside the doorway. Each time the car took a sudden lurch forward she fell helplessly back, and three times she landed in the arms of a large, comfortable man. The third time it happened lie said quietly: "Hadn't you better stay here?" Dinah was a product of New Orleans, a big, piuin | > "yaller gal," who could cook the tinesi dinners for miles around. One day a new butler appeared upon the scene, and Dinah's mistress noticed that she took a great interesi in the man. At last her mis tress could stand her curiosity no longer and asked. "Dinah, do you know that new man.'" Dinah took another long and scrut inizing look and then slowly and reminis cently replied: "Well, I dunno, Miss Alice; but I think he was mah fust husband." The commercail traveler met Sandy, the canny one, emerging from the postoffice. "Ah, Sandy!" cried the commercia...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 September 1920

@a^ch& PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTONS WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE 3 ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 3579 Office 317 22nd Aye. South SENATOR JONES YOUR FRIEND Whether there be one or ten thousand colored voters in this state it is the duty of each and every one of them to rally to the support of Wesley L. Jones in the com ing primary election. No man since the immortal Charles Stunner ever stood up in the United States senate and championed the rights of the colored man as did Sen ator Jones and that too in the face of the red handed murderers of the South from whose hands the blood of four thousand lynched colored persons was still dripping. Single handed and alone Senator Jones beat down the character assassins—the Till mans and the Vardemans —and placed the color...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 September 1920

Governor Hart's Platform Made Up of Official Acts Gubernatorial candidates attempt to confuse and mislead voters by statements that they will do "so and so", most of whick already has been done or is being done by the governor himself. GOV. LOUIS P. HART Candidate to Succeed Himsalf as Governor of the State That some of the candidates in the gu bernatorial primary campaign are either deliberately attempting to confuse and mis lead the voters, or are themselves ignorant of some conditions about which they are speaking and publishing platforms and newspaper articles, is the declaration made at Governor Louis F. Hart's King County headquarters in the Alaska Building. "When <i candidate for Governor of this great state says in his campaign utterances that he favors a budget law," said one of Governor Hart's strong supporters, "he cither insults the intelligence of the voter or displays a serious lack of knowledge about Stale affairs—because this state has had a budget law for many ye...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 4 September 1920

THE PASSING THRONG I met C. A. Davis of Everett one day this week, who is campaigning for Col. Hartley and he is rather full of his BUbject and said: "II you knew Col. Hartley as I do you and every other colored man in the state would be for him. In my opinion no one now running for the gubernatorial nomination has shown as much genuine friendship for the meritorious colored person as has Col. Hartley and in substantiation of the above statement he will get every colored vote in Snohomish county. As lam talking to you concerning Col. Hartley, so have all of the other colored men in and about Everett talked to me about him and I therefore am voicing the sentiment of all of them, who know him best, when I say to you with Col. Hartley in the gubernatorial chair of this state the colored man has a true friend at court." The last intermarriage bill introduced in the legislature of this state was in 1915 and Avas introduced by a member from Whitman county by request and it was the concens...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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