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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

forcibly that the leaves of the tree are the laboratory where the crude sap is worked over into elaborated sap consisting largely of sugar and starch. Of course, if the laboratory is impaired the sap will be deficient in these ingredients and the growth of the tree as well as the quality of the fruit must be impaired. * * * In some sections of the Northwest the green aphis is quite troublesome and does considerable damage, especi ally to young trees. It must not be forgotten that it is worse in some sec tions than in others. In our hot val leys where the codling moth does its greatest injury the green aphis does but very little harm. In the higher and cooler regions it is in some cases a serious pest. As the Puget Sound country is cooler than the valleys east of the Cascade range, here it is quite harmful. This rule may be accepted as practically correct, that where the codling moth is very bad the green aphis is not bad and the reverse is true. How to successfully combat this insec...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

6 THE DAIRY Competition and Value of Cream. Editor The Ranch: As announced in The Ranch of March Ist, Mount Vernon is getting or has now got a creamery. The most of the cream from this valley used to be shipped to Seattle creameries. The express charges, which amounted to about one cent per pound for the butter fat, had of course been paid by the farmer. Now at least one Seattle creamery is offering to pay the express charges. In other words, this means one cent a pound more to the dairyman for his butter fat. This gives us a good rea son to think that the Seattle creamery business has not been such a losing proposition as Mr. H. I. Weinstein is trying to make us believe. Has such an offer been made to the dairymen all over the western part of the state, or is the butter fat from Mount Ver non worth one cent a pound the most? A. J. HANNESDALB. Mount Vernon, Wn. Problem of Better Dairy Cattle. The breeding of beef cattle is a comparatively easy matter. Given the right ideal the selec...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

Whatcom creamery, now known as Smith & Company's creamery. This es tablishment has thrived so well that it has paid two annual dividends. The second dividend of five per cent has just been declared, and A. Pancoast, tieasurer of the company, is passing substantial checks around among the shareholders. It is interesting to re call that the majority of those who subscribed for stock in the original concern did so from philanthropic mo tives and never expected to get returns in the shape of dividends. One local firm which has kept account of its subscriptions to industrial enterprises arranged the money thus expended in two columns. One was designated as stock from which dividends were ex pected, and the other was called do nations. Strange to say, out of about twenty subscriptions to stock com panies, the money which was put into the Whatcom creamery, and which was assigned to the donation column, is the only one of them all that has returned dividends. The creamery business in th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

8 Ranch Legal Department Edited by R. J. BORYER. This department is open to all the patrons of The Ranch. Inquiries on legal matters will be answered free in these columns. If a reply by letter is desired enclose a fee of One Dollar to R. J. Boryer, care The Ranch, Seattle. C. G. 8., South Park—Please tell me through your paper if there is any law in this state prohibiting me from building a barb wire fence near South Park. —Ans.: It will be lawful for you to build a barbed-wire fence, provided you build it exactly as the law provides it shall be built, how ever if you are going to build it in a town that is incorporated, you must consult the town ordinances, other wise not. Bellevue—Where the community property is in the wife's name can the husband will the property to their children legally?—Ans.: The hus band can only will one-half of the community property as a general principle. If property is in the name of husband or wife it will depend upon the circumstances of how it happen...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

I" 1 It looks as \WA «jy if a man's | VL/& 1 back is the M^ 3* .1.:. center of s7?^^X | strength when >^y^y^\ I he is straining I to lift or haul a A^ I heavy weight. \&sX\\V'^ I But the center iMg»v\x£ aof strength is iB&SBk&r 1 not the back, i**&\s h but the stom ■ ach. There's no strength in I the back of a giant if he's • 1 starving. All strength is made I from food, and food can only 1 be converted into strength | when it is perfectly digested • I and assimilated. When the 1 stomach is diseased, the nutri -1 tion of food is lost and phys | ical weakness follows. I Dr. Pierce' Golden Medical 1 Discovery cures diseases of the I stomach and other organs of ■ digestion and nutrition. It ■ makes' men strong and mus- I cular, by enabling the perfect 1 digestion and assimilation \ of the food eaten. \ "I suffered from a very obsti lS nate case of dyspepsia," *\ writes R. E. Secord, Esq., of v 13 Eastern Ay., Toronto, On _^x s\_ tario. " I tried a number mxNar Ji...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

10 Poultry Interests . BY H. L. BLANCHARD. _ To Cur- Egg-Eating Habit. (Mrs. M. O. Tibbits, Mission.) I think that I made a discovery last week, which will be of interest to all poultry raisers. It is a cure for egg eating fowls. Perhaps it is a well known receipt, but as I never heard of it, I am sure there are many others to whom it will be news. I founfl a scarcity of eggs in one pen for several days in succession, but did not guess the cause, until that pen was acci dentally left open and the twenty-five hens became pretty well mixed among several other pens. Then the troublu began. Half the eggs were eaten in the nests, and in despair of a remedy I threw the china nest-eggs on the floor and watched developments. The hens pounced upon them for an hour or so, "then gave up in disgust, and now they will not look at a genuine egg put before them, much less try to break it. If care is used that they lay no soft-shelled eggs, hens are not likely to learn egg-eating, but a few soft sh...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

Washington a Sportsman's Paradise. With an equable climate, a summer of sunshine seven months long, and woods stocked with large and small furred game and also numerous varie ties of wild fowl, waters teeming with myriad finny tribes, Washington offers peculiar attraction to the hunter, the angler and the pleasure seeker and the tourist as well, says a writer in Col man's Rural World of St. Louis. In Europe men travel the length and i readth of an empire after sport that < annot compare with that which hun dreds of settlers find every morning at their very doors in Washington. The city man with a taste for angling or hunting takes a ride out the length of the street car lines, walks a mile into the woods, and enjoys sport which is only secured in the preserves of the nobility in the old countries. Fifty miles distant from any of the large cities he will find sport that men cross and recross continents and oceans to find. Elk, deer, wild goats and wild sheep and bear abound in Was...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

12 FRUIT PROSPECTS OF THE STATE rContinued from Pace Om.) much as possible i* done with ma chinery, and the i>ig timber is fast disappearing from both hills and val leys. More farms are cleared, also with machinery and powder, and pleas ant homes are how found where but a few years ago was our largest tim ber and where deer, bears and cougars wandered at will. All this land is of the very best fruit soil in the world, and is now planted to orchards, principally apples, but all kinds of fruit adapted to this climate does equally well. There is at the present time about 2,500 acres in fruit in Cowlitz and 4,000 acres in Lewis county. With the importation of nursery stock and fruit from Oregon and California to supply the increased demand, caused by large increase in population, came diseases and insect pests, such as apple scab, black spot, brown mold, woolly aphis, green aphis, oyster-shell bark louse and others, and the orchards have for a time been un productive, but with better...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

Livestock Industry Eradication of Scabies in Cattle. Fhero are a number of names ap plied to what is in reality scabies or mange in cattle. Some call it "range itch," others say it is simply cattle itch, and still others call it "Texas itch." The proper name is "mange." The disease is quite prevalent in por tions of the western range, and meth ods for eradicating it have been given by different authorities, but the best and most practical is dipping. Scabies, or mange, of the ox is a contagious disease caused by a parasitic mite. There are two classes of this mite, but they are much alike and similar treat ment may be prescribed for either. The one which most frequently affects cattle lives on the surface of the skin and gives rise to great irritation and itching by biting. It is most frequent upon the sides of the neck and shoulders, at the base of the horns and at the root of the tail. From these points it spreads to the sides and may invade nearly the entire body. Its principal m...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

14 same distance apart, and 1-inch cracks are in the floor to allow the free escape of the liquid as the cage is being raised. One of the blocks mentioned is attached to the cage by means of six 14-inch iron rods securely fastened at corner tops and one each midway on the sides. Gate at each end is strongly hinged and barred when closed. The animal goes in at one end and out the other. When the animal goes out it steps into a dripping chute 14 feet long, with 18-inch slope. The floor of this chute must be built tight so the liquid will run down and into a small trough to catch the drip. This trough should have a pipe to carry the drip back to the heating tank. For heating purposes a thrashing engine may be used, by connecting a I^4-inch pipe to the whistle intake, the whistle being removed and the pipe joined to the union. In lowering the cage when loaded one person can easily perform the operation by taking a hitch around a post, and it may be raised either with engine or horses. T...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

through the Palouse country the most favored amusement in the fall is an arrangement for a neighborhood coy ote hunt in which a dozen or more farmers with their dogs meet at a certain point and round up the coun try. This sport is destined to become very general throughout eastern Wash ington as the farmers become pos sessed of coyote hunting dogs and we hope to have the pleasure of joining in some of these coyote hunts during the coming season. Sheep from State at St. Louis. Commissioner Johnson, of the Wash ington commission for the Louisiana Purchase fair, has suggested a novel plan for impressing upon visitors to the fair the high standard of excel lence attained by the sheep of this state as to texture and weight of fleece, etc. Mr. Johnson says it has been suggested by many friends of the wool industry of our state that the size of our sheep, texture, weight of fleece, etc., could be cheaply and practically demonstrated by showing at St. Louis in taxidermy a family each of our...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

16 LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP!! I I f^ \A / L 10 Why> look for the rig-ht kind of a Cream Separator, before you lilpil LOOK TO WIIPIT* *caP n*lo buying *ke first make of machine that maybe is of jfy }, L.wWi\ l>/| IIIIULi fered you. This is leap year anyway; so you may be a little jL w> more apt to leap than usual. It is the year of the woman's choice. Let her have a say in the <^\M^ji§l matter. Let the housewife make the choice. It's her option, this 1904. No agent can talk her £\/^2j^^^^^^k ■ *n*° buying one of the "other kind" of Separators if she ever got her eye on what is inside their \^^^^^^ jfn ||\y|k bowls, and had it taken out and spread out on the table; it would be all off with them, for they l^^rßßf/' Biliil all neec* washing"* whether they are cylinders full of holes (every hole should be cleansed), 111 \£tt(l l Nmß knuckle scarring graters, multitudinous discs which need to be gone over twice, once to cleanse yffl!st4 111 an( once to dry ' or they will rust" The...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1904

THE RANCH 7<^^ m~"-*T^*-*7^*.^1."*~'SVy^2ss£'4.> 0f..'f^..'*t»'' *f' • «°J." s . "''.. ' '#•"*»**• *" VOL XXI. No. 8. SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, APRIL 15, 1904. H. L. BLANCHARD, Associate Editor The Ranch and Author Blanchard's Poultry Book. Subscription 50c. per Year.

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1904

2 School of Experience This department Is by and for the sub scribers of The Ranch. Contributions of not over 300 wards are asked of all who have anything valuable and of practical utility to relate. No definite subject Is named, but It Is desired that what Is written for this de partment be pertinent to farming conditions In the Northwest. All are at liberty to write and no restriction Is placed on the number of articles you send in. For each accepted article credit will be given on our books for 30 cents, to be taken out in either subscription or advertising. Write on one side of the paper only, and always give your full name and address, though not neces sarily for publication If not desired by the correspondent. Increasing Size of Hens —Last spring we had eleven Barred Rock hens that weighed from 4Ms to 6 pounds. We bought a thoroughbred Barred Rock cockerel that weighed 9 pounds for two dollars, to mate with them. This spring fifteen pullets taken at random from a flock of fift...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1904

THE RANCH Wltb which is consolidated Thf Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. PHIL. L. AXLINO, EtolTOB Associate Editors: F. Walden. H. L. Blanchabd. MILLER FREEMAN - - Publisher Editorial Offices : Seattle, Wash. Tel. Main 1265—Long Distance Connection. BUSINESS OFFICES : Seattle, - - Third Floor Downs Building. Spokane, Alexander & Co., 521 First Aye. Subscription (in advance), one year, 50 cts.; six months, 30 cts. If on time, sub scription will be one dollar. Seattle sub scribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and sala ries paid. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue Is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1904

4 Horticultural Notes By F. WALDEN. , Judge J. H. Forney, of Moscow, Ida ho, is a progressive fruit grower. We have published communications from him in these columns before. The following letter from him is instruct ive as well as interesting and especial ly so when accompanied with the dia gram that he incloses: "When in Portland, at the meeting of the Northwestern Horticultural As sociation, I had a very interesting con versation with you in regard to the keeping qualities of apples, with spe cial reference to the time they were picked. After careful observation, I find that all the apples, as a rule, on a tree do not mature at the same time, but like pears and plums, some ripen much earlier than others. And also that after the ripe apples are gathered those remaining on the tree grow rap idly and often become first class ap ples. Here in Northern Idaho, at an altitude of about 2,700 feet above the sea, we pride ourselves on growing a first class winter apple, and one whose keepi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1904

they know it to be such or can know if they wish. If they impose on the people and the fact can be proven, they should be punished. Let no guil ty man escape. ♦ * * The orchardists of Washington will be compelled to study the question of soil fertility sooner or later or be doomed to disappointment. This is es pecially so in all that vast stretch of country east of the Cascade range. The same thing is true in eastern Ore gon and all of Idaho. Just here I shall not now enter into any consider able discussion of the different ele ments of fertility that are needd in any soil. The three chief ones are ni trogen, phosphoric acid and potash. At present only nitrogen will be con sidered. This is one of the elements of fertility that we must have in order to make any plant growth. Some plants have the capacity of gathering the needed nitrogen from the air but others have not this capacity. The nitrogen gathering plants are called legumes, which means that they bear their seeds in pods. Hen...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1904

6 THE DAIRY Steers from Dairy Bred Cows. (Prof. T. L. Haecker.) Cattle experiments have shown that steers from dairy bred cows hold their own fairly well both in the feed lot and on the block with those from cows of the beef breds. It is admitted that buyers of feeders, and butchers as well, are in the habit of shading the price of steers that show dairy mark ings; but that is only a prejudice, or used as a pretext to drive a sharp bar gain. If steers were fed and slaughtered at home for the local market, as they should be, local butchers would soon learn that there is little difference, if any, in the butchering qualities of the two kinds of steers, and the dairy steers would soon sell for what they are really worth. Some who pretend to be honest and truthful say that dairy steers require more feed for a given gain in weight than beef bred sters; that they mature more slowly, and are meager in the choice cuts. There is no warrant for any of these state ments, and those who make the...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1904

into the milk at each feed. Gradually the amount of skim milk and flax meal is increased, so that by the end of the fourth week the calf is getting a heap ing teaspoonful of flax meal and ten pints of milk twice a day. After the first month the calf is given access to a little hay and whole oats with bran or shorts. Under this system the calf always appears more hungry after its meal than before, but it is better thus than to let it have a larger mess and suffer from scours. The International Milk Condensing Company, which operates the factory at Chehalis, reports doing a big busi ness with that plant. The busines is growing fast, but the company is un able to fill all the orders for its pro duct. C. L. Roper is now doing the condensing and his work is spoken of in the highest terms by the owners of the plant. The company could find ready sale for 250 cases of milk a day if it could get the milk with which to turn it out. The formaldehyde dis coveries in the large cities and other c...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 April 1904

H Ranch Legal Department Edited by R. J. DORYER. This department is open to all the patrons of The Ranch. Inquiries on legal matters will be answered free in these columns. If a reply by letter is desired enclose a fee of One Dollar to R. J. Boryer, care The Ranch, Seattle. Deeds. (1) All conveyances of real estate, or any interest therein, and all con tracts creating or evidencing any in cumbrance upon real estate shall be by deed. (2) A deed shall be in writing, signed by the party bound thereby, and acknowledged by the party making it; before some person authorized by the laws of this state to take the acknowl edgment of deeds. (3) The addition of a private seal to any contract in writing shall not af fects its validity or legality in any re spect. (4) All deeds, mortgages, and as signments of mortgages, shall be re corded in the office of the county aud itor of the county where the land is situated, and shall be valid as against bona fide purchasers from the date of their filing...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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