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Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857) Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 8 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 May 1846

rRNAPSt OTT’S GENERAL EMIGRATION OF.1. FICES, 73 South street, corner of Maiden Lane, New York, ami 90 Waterloo Komi, Liverpool. Arrangements Jor 1 Sill. In calling attention tp their arrangements for 1646, the subscribers cannot hut express the pleasure they feel in acknowledging the unexampled success they have met with during the past year, and beg to assure their friends and the public of the United States and Canada, that the same untiring industry and marked attention to the comfort of those entrusted to their care for the purpose of being conveyed across the Atlantic, which have gained for their House such wide spread popularity will be their constant study to sustain. The Lines for w hich the subscribers are Agents consists of the New Line or Ltvehroot. Packets, viz: Quee.v of the West, (new), 1250 tons burthen, Capt. P. Woodhouse , suils from New York, Jan 21st, May 21st, Sept 21st; from Liverpool, March tith, July tith, Nov 6th. Shehidan, 1100 tons, Capt. G. B. Cornish, fr...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 8 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 May 1846

WILLIAMS & «LI OX’S ESTABLISHED PASSAGE OFFICE. ARRANGEMENTS FOR I S4(>. Passage from Great Britain and Ireland. The Subscribers be* leave to inform those persons aboutsendin* Ibr their friends, that they have completed extensive arrangements Ibr the year lido, for bringing out passengers from England, Ireland, and Scotland, in a comfortable manner, and on the most reasonable terms, by the regular packets, sailing every five days throughout the season, aud by other first class American ships, commanded by the most experienced musters in the trade, sailing from the port every week. Their agents at Liverpool will attend personally to the embarkation of all passengers engaged for at their office, and at their agencies. They are determined to spare neither money nor expense to promote the comfort and convenience of their passengers; and to tatrry this more fully into effect, they wish to announce that a person from their olfice will reside in Liverpool during the ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 8 Advertisements Column 3 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 May 1846

JOHN HERUMAX iSc CO.'S Old Established United States and Great Britain and Ireland EMIGRANT PASSAGE OFFICE, No. G 1 South street, New \ ork. HERDMAN, KKENAN & CO., Liverpool. And by their Boston Assent, MR. MICHAEL MOONEY, tit the Catholic bookstore, Federal street,—the sure good old stand. Passage to and from Great Britain and Ireland, via Liverpool and London, by the regular packet ships, sailing on the Ist, tilh, lllh, loth, 2lst, and 26th of each month to and Ironi Liverpoo, and to and from London on the Ist, 10th, and 20th of each month. The Liverpool United Line is comprised of the following superior ships-. SHIPS. CAPTAINS. TONS. SHIPS. CAPTAIN’S. TONS. Independence, Allen, 750 Henry Clay, Nye, 1300 Waterloo, Allen, 1000 Fidelia, Huckstaff, 1000 Hottinguer, Burnley, 903 Roscius, Eldridge, 1331 Europe, Furber, 030 Ashburton, Howland, 1000 John H. Skiddy,Skiddy, 980 New York, Cropper, Siddnus, Cobb, 895 Liverpool, Eldriilge, Shenandoah, West, 800 Yorkshire, Bailey, ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 8 Advertisements Column 4 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 May 1846

RO< HE. BROTHERS & UO.’S ARRANGE ME N'tB FOR 184 0 Remittances to, and Fas sage to and from Great Britain and Ireland, by the “Black Ball, or Old Line oj Liverjlool Rackets,” sailing from JStw York and Liverpool on the Ist and lotA cj every month. And by First Class American Ships, sailing weekly. Persons scuoiiig to the “Old Country” tor their friends, can make the necessary arrangements with the subscribers, and have them brought out in any of the Eight Ships comprising the black Ball, or Old Line of Liverpool Packets, from Liverpool on the Ist and ltith of every month,) also by First Class Ships, sailing from thut port weekly, which our Agents, Messrs. James I>. Roche A Cos there will see are sent out without delay. Should those sent for not come out, the Money will be refunded without any deduction. The Black Ball, or Old Line of Liverpool Packets, comprise the following magnificent ships, and will sail from Liverpol on their regular appointed d...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 8 Advertisements Column 5 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 9 May 1846

»COMB MANUFACTORY & FANCY STORE, A. S. JORDAN, No. 2 Milk (street,, two doors from Washington street, Boston Manulacturer of all kinds of COMBS, which he offers to the city or cohntry trade by the package oy otherwise, on the most favorable terms. Also, importer of every description of ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN FANCY GOODS. Has on hand the following:—A large assortment of wrought and plain Shell Back Combs, olhis owumunufac, ture. 500 dozen Shell Side Combs, 1000 do Loggerhead Shell Side Combs. 600 gross Wrought and-Plain Horn Hack Combs, 350 do Finished Horn Side, on Cards, 450 do Unfinished do do, 500 do Old Sides, OOOdozen Horn Dressing Combs, 400 do Ivory Combs, sss, ss ands fine, 300 do Pocket Books, embracing over 500 different fatterns, lair, Tooth, and Shaving Brushes. Also a largd assortment of FANCY GOODS, at wholesale or retail, consisting of Knives, Razors, Scissors, Needles, Pins, German Silver Pencils and Spectacles, Bead Purses, Silk Purses, Fancy Boxes,...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

BOSTON PILOT. I*. D OVA HOE, < EDITOa, • > T. I>. M’tjrkOE, ( IKISIt CORRESPONDENT. } BE JUST, AND FEAR NOT - LET ALL THE ENDS THOU AIM'ST AT, BE THY GOD'S, THY COUNTRTS, AND TRUTH'S. < OFFICE, > t No. 1, Sprino Lake. ) $2.30::::1it Boston, Satnvbon, JHaji IG, ISSG. bolumc 9::::5fo. 29.

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SONGS OF EXILE. AIR—Aileen Aroon. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

SONGS OF EXILE. AIR—Aileen Aroon. IRLANDAIS. For Ike Pilot. Serfhood the arm of industry quells, Freedom the might of the forest ouk fells, Slavery branded is, ‘ Freedom how graud it is!— In a far land it is, liberty dwells. • I know her dwelling, triumphantly said Hope, so we followed the path where she led,— Rocked by the wintry gale, Over the seas we sail, Leaving poor Innisfail sleeping or dead. Exile! thy weariness what can relieve? Exile ! thy silent heart ever must grieve: Country and countrymen ! Your rudest hill or glen, For “ promise ” land again, ne’er would I leave. Bright at a distance is liberty’s flame, Even tho’ nearer it burn the game, Many, its light has woo’d Into a solitude'.— OU ! our .nationhood ! that is the name. That is the polar star, that is the ray, Cheering the eyes and the minds far away, When all our land is bright With its enlarging light, Then will the exile’s night change into day. Exiled from Erin, that vigil we keep,— Yet from her thraldom our nat...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
LITERATURE. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

LITERATURE. The. Poets and Dramatists of Ireland. By Denis F. M'Carthy. Dublin: James Duffy, Wellington-guay. One of the great causes of national complaint is the unwholesome character of our export trade. We send off our raw material, partly to pay the absentee—partly to be worked up by the British manufacturer, and resold in our own markets at an immense profit. As it fares with the material, so it does with the intellectual trade, only with triiis difference, which, however, is more apparent than real, that the exportation in the one case is compulsory—in the other voluntary. The reason why London attracted the genius of Ireland depends on the common principle of demand and supply. At home there was no encouragement for native intellect, or if any, it was that of the poor poet in Juvenal, “to sing and starve.” Now poets, it is universally admitted, however fond of song, are also fond of sustenance; and having no means of procuring it at home, very naturally went in quest of it el...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
INDIA—IRELAND! [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

INDIA—IRELAND! We ( Freeman ) have been favored with the perusal of a letter which has been received in this city from a medical officer who has been engaged in the struggle on the banks of the Sutlej. The letter is daFebruary 1, ant! was written before the fourth battle; an extract will be found below. After describing the battle of Alii—wallah, the particulars of which have been already placed before our readars, the writer adds—“We are raising a subscription for the distressed poor fellows in Ireland, and more munificent contributions 1 never heard of. The sum collected will be immense; all the soldiers are subscribing. The Irish were the boys who beat the Sikhs—every Queen’s regiment swarms with them. Tell your friends that Ireland did her duty in this campaign: many a brave Paddy I saw get his death wound, and Irish blood flowed profusely and ungrudgingly—what reward will England give— Repeal?” The writer of this feels like a man, but knows little of the weight of obligations t...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE JESUITS. From the Waterford Chronicle. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

THE JESUITS. From the Waterford Chronicle. These famous men are now, ns ever, but more particularly now, since Young Switzerland and Eugene Sue, and Michilet, and the Morning Chronicle , and the Daily News have, vented their spleen against them—the best abused people in the world. Their holy mission is proved by the opposition given to them by bad men. They have no place on which to lay their head—like Him whose name they bear, and like His followers, the poor exterminated Irishmen. Some men are blamed for being viscious and proud, and worldly ; but, actually the Jesuits are blamed and cursed because they subdue the passions. They are abused because they make the novices go through a strict vovitiate ; but does it not appear that they do right, by the very existence of the Book which is the object of our notice? We have the authority of Sj. Paul for it, that “ he that was born according to the flesh, persecuted him that was after the spirit—so also is it now.” Yes, and now it is so....

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ESTABLISHED CHURCH-PLURALITIES. From the London Globe. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

ESTABLISHED CHURCH-PLURALITIES. From the London Globe. The Ecclesiastical Gazette of yesterday announces the preferment of the Rev. Francis Dawson to the vicarage of East Peckham (Kent.) The emoluments derived from this vicarage are respectable: on a moderate computation they amount to 750/. per annum. Had the preferment been conferred as a reward for distinguished merit, or had some worthy man, well nigh worn out by years of toil, as a recognition of Ins devotion to the duties of his vocation, under circumstances which precluded him from receiving even a competency for his support; the church would have gained a character, and many a desponding “workingclergyman” would have lifted up his head with hope. Nay, had some unbeneficed clergyman been selected for this preferment—even though he were but recently invested with priest’s orders —there would have been nothing to commend. The church would have been preserved frofn scandal, though the system of providing parochial clergy could n...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Ireland [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

Ireland The following is the speech of John O’Connell, alluded to in our last:— Mr. John O’Connell next presented himself and and was received with loud and long-continued cheering. He said — My Lord Mayor and gentlemen, I shall, take the libertv of addressing a few words j to the meeting in the joy of my heart, at | finding myself once more in old Ireland, and amongst my beloved countrymen (cheers). But first I have to hand in some money—3/. from Magherfelt, county Derry; from Callen, in the county Kilkenny, 31. (The hon. gentleman handed in some other sums, which will be published in the weekly returns.) He then continu- I ed—l have to express my warm and heart- j felt thanks to you for the kind manner in ! which you have received me; but I will j not delay you with a long expression of my thanks and joy, if I even could give | expression to the emotions of my heart, at feeling myself once more among my true j and noble-minded countrymen, after battling with the euemiesof our coun...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
TROUBLE IN THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

TROUBLE IN THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH. A Pastoral Letter, addressed by the Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State of V ermont/ to the people of his diocese, on the subject of his correspondence with the Rev. William Henry Hoit, late Hector of Union Church, St. Albans, Burlington: Chauncey Goodrich, ls>4ti, pp. 48. The Right Reverend author of this letter is the most celebrated pamphleteer ia the United States of America. As Jack in the box, when the lid is removed, pops up his head and looks all around him, so doth this Bishop sally forth with some new catch-penny production, whenever he has a chance of obtruding himself upon public notice; as if, forsooth, he was heartily tired of the quiet and repose of his Green Mountain solitude, and‘panted for notoriety. The subject of attack in the aforesaid letter is the Rev. William Henry Hoit, an estimable, devoted presbyter in the diocese of Vemnont, who, not approving of the course pursued by his own diocese, in the a...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
WAR WITH MEXICO. MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

WAR WITH MEXICO. MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT. JAMES K. POLK. Washington, May 11. The fact which absorbs in its importance all incidental occurrences of the day at Washington, is, that the President has transmitted to both Houses of Congress declaring that Mexico has commenced war with the United States, and recommending that measures be taken for prosecuting it with vigor and effect, both by land and sea. The floor of the House of Representatives at the opening of the session, was covered with members, and the space without the bar, by persons having the privilege of entrance. The galleries also were filled with male and female spectators. A message from the President was delivered. It was immediately read. The President refers to the passages in his annual message relating to Mexico, in which he had described the existing relations with that country. In describing the origin of the mission of Mr. Slidell, the President states that in September last he directed the American Consul at...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
PUBLIC MORALS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

PUBLIC MORALS. A writer in one of the sectarian Jou~ nals published in this city, endeavors to awaken public attention to the great and increasing evil produced by the circulation of certain immoral and obscene books. One of the statements in the communication of the writer ought to alarm all who have the direction of youth, and who wish to preserve from utter ruin the morals of the rising generation. In any work of this kind, the sectarian will find the Catholic willing to aid h : rn with all his strength. Immoral books are an enemy of such a horrid nature, that all who truly believe in God, will unite for their suppression. It may be well for those who are now so justly terrified by the flood of impure literature which is overspreading the land, to consider how far they have contributed to its existence. When sin can succeed in covering its deformity with the veil of religion then is it most to be dreaded, because it becomes almost omnipotent in mischief. Who have led the way in t...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
The Farmer FARM WORK FOR MAY. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

The Farmer FARM WORK FOR MAY. May has come, bright May, apd yet we are not prepared. May is our planting month, say what they will at Cape Horn and Cape Good Hope. May is the month of promises as August is of performance. Wake up, oh sluggard,and you may see a May sun just rising from the ocean; clean, and bright, and mild. Yet can look him in the face at rising without a smoked glass. Now the ploughman looks anxious while he drives his team into the field. Now the dung-fork and the spade are active in preparing nutriment for plants—the decaying matter that has done its office and returns again to mother earth to assist in rearing her children. Rotation, all; the sun hirn-j self revolves, his planets wander round [ him. Comets change; seas roll; and plants turn again to plants, with new organization and for new purposes. Animals, too, take their turn in 4 the rotary dance. Animals are fed by plants, | and in turn are the food of plants. All things are changing and “all will be | cha...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
A Little of Every Thing. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

A Little of Every Thing. Thoughts for the Ladies. Sweet young ladies, married and to he married, please read the following: A woman may be of great assistance to her husband in wearing a cheering smile continually upon her countenance. A man’s perplexities and gloominess are increased a hundredfold when his better half moves about with a continual scowl upon her brow. A pleasant wife is as a rainbow set in the sky, when her husband’s mind is tossed with the storms and tempest; but a dissatisfied and fretful wife, in the hour of trouble, is like one of those fiends who are appointed to torture our lost spirits. . The last number of Punch has a capital hit at the exquisities. A nice young man is represented in confab with a cab driver, and the following is the outline of the conversation: “Drivah! have you gat a very good, easy ’oss?” “Yes sir.” “Avery gentle, fine animal?” “Got a weary fine ’oss, sir.” “Well, ah!—drivah! “Sir.” “Drive me next door!” “Ceesar, what’s dat they mean abou...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
IMPORTANT FROM MEXICO! [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

IMPORTANT FROM MEXICO! In the New Orleans papers of May Ist, we have more exciting news than we have v’et had from the army' in Texas. Our latest advices were that Arista had superseded Ampudia in the command of the i Mexican forces at Matamoras, and hostilities would be postponed till June. But by arrivals from Brazos Santiago to the 25th ult., it appears that on the 24th General Taylor sent an express stating that the commander of the Mexican forces had made a formal declaration to General Taylor that if he did not move his army from the position he then occupied within 36 hours, the Mexican batteries would be opened upon them. The same express also said that a body of 2000 Mexicans had crossed the Rio Grande near Boretta, a small town about eight miles below Matamoras,*on the west bank of the river, and taken up a position between Point Isabel and General Taylor’s camp. The Picayune says:— “ The design of this movement is evidently to cut off from the American troops their suppli...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 16 May 1846

DR. LACERTE, No. 35 Bench opposite the United Stales’ Hotel. street, nearly niyS tf JOHN W. COLLINS has opened a BOARDING HOUSE in I’orterstreet, Hast Boston, where those in want of good fare may rely upau being well accommodated. mya JOHN HORAN, Canal street, Boston, is authorised to receive subscribers for the Lives of the Saints. He can also supply anv Catholic book published, rah 14 JRLILLI, 41) Carmine street, corner of Bed- • ford, Hew York, LAMB MANUFACTURER, has on hand a constant supply of Lamps, Lanterns, Globes, Glasses, Wicks, and Campheuc, ut the lowest market prices. A liberal discount given to the Trade on Lamps and Lanterns. MhH DR. S. STOCKING. SURGEON DENTIST, No. '£ (>ti Washington st, comer of Avon Place, Boston, still odors his professional services to the community, ill all the various departments embraced in practical dentistry; whether surgical, mechanical, or curative. His long experience, extensive practice, well adapted instruments, and period f...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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