ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Mountain Laurel Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
2,606 results
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

Continued from page 20. little fresh water springs trickling down the bluff supplied ample drinking and cooking water. The chemical plants hadn't destroyed South River at that point in time and it was loaded with perch, sucker and big english carp. I've seen my Dad lie down near the edge of the river and run his hand up under the embankment and throw out a big half frozen sucker. South River provided the Hobos with all the fresh fish they wanted. Some of the songs the Hobos sang as they cooked over open fires along South River still run through my mind as I remember sitting on top of the bluff with my Dad. As I grew older, I would go to the bluff alone and listen to the Hobos until late in the night. One particular song comes to mind more than fifty years after I first heard it. I'm sure there are many more verses to this song, but the following is all I can remember. I hope the words are right. "In the Big Rock Candy Mountains, There's a land that's fair and bright, Where the hando...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

PAGE 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1985 MORE GYPSY STORIES Editor's Note... Here are a couple of responses we received after Mr. R.M. Janney's story about his childhood experiences was printed. It seems that the "fear of gypsies" was a common one. Few actually ever saw gypsies, but all had heard vague warnings from their parents or grandparents. They were a part of the lore of yesterday. THE LAST OF THE PLAYHOUSE GANG By: Eunice N. Harrelson The doll house was on display in the bank's lobby, sitting under the Christmas tree. A magnificent creation, a tiny mansion with flawlessly appointed rooms filled with hand made furniture. Some lucky person would draw the winning ticket and take it home to gladden a child's Christmas . It brought to mind the happy time we had spent playing "playhouse" in the late twenties. But what - a difference in the playhouses! Mine was a rural family living on a farm in Caswell County near the old Walter's Mill. Our nearest neighbor was the Gregory family. Every ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

MEMORIES OF MOUNTAIN MOTHERS Continued from page 2. TRIBUTE TO MOUNTAIN MOTHERS By: Ann H. Winebarger My Mother's paternal grandparents are the only great grandparents that I remember. The others either died before I was born, or when I was very young. Especially I remember my great grandmother Woodie. Her name was Zora Powell Woodie and the little mountain home of her and my great grandfather, Mae was situated close by the Blue Ridge Parkway near the Watauga and Ashe County line in North Carolina. And located very close to the beautiful Cascade's Waterfall, which is visited by hundreds every year. During the 1950'5, on a pretty Sunday in mid-summer, our family would load up and drive to GreatGrandma's. Sometimes we took Mother's parents, my grandma and grandpa Woodie along, because they had no car or other way of going very often. After we left the Parkways we'd stop our vehicle and walk the rest of the way. There was a fairly good dirt road to travel, but too many gates to open an...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

PAGE 24 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1985 SPRING PLANTING AND MAMA'S GARDEN In the springtime, I always relate back to Mama's garden... On our little hillside farm, there was very little power equipment to farm with. We had a young mule, a plow or two, a drag harrow made from the top of a pine tree or maybe some slabs from the sawmill, a sled with homemade runners - Anything beyond that was hard to find, so for the most part, the power equipment was six kids with a hoe in hand. With the eyes of two parents on us and the limb of a tree so close at hand, we could clean out a fair sized new ground and make it ready for planting in most any 12 hour day. Many of our fields were on the side of the mountain where mule and plow could not go. But as long as it would grow corn (most mountain soil would), we would have it planted by the time the dog woods were white with blossom. To be sure, this was no easy task, digging among stumps, rocks, thorns, briars, or whatever else might be growing in those ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

BENFIELDS STORE Continued from page 24. only a nickel, too. I reckon the men talked about the same things they talked about later, in stores owned by Price, Teague, Bowman and others in the mountain area, long after Benfield's had been torn down in order to widen the road. If it wasn't how the weather was affecting crops, it was about politics and religion. "Dad", as I called my grandfather, was a strong Republican. He and a handful of others were outnumbered by their Democrat neighbors. The Depression hadn't given our side much support. Religious arguments, it seemed, centered around whether you went straight to Heaven when you died, or stayed in the ground to await the Lord's return. My grandpa hung relentlessly to the latter, convinced that the only people who lived on after death were those Democrats who always came back at voting time. If the store had a radio I don't remember it. But my grandparents had one of the few radios thereabouts. It was a Philco or Emerson or possibly ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

PAGE 26 MOUNTAIN LAUREL MAY, 1985 BACKROADS Continued from page 28. are just a few of the highlights of this month's tour. A leisurely afternoon, a camera and a picnic lunch to be enjoyed along the way will combine to make this drive a perfect way to enjoy the Blue Ridge at its best. 00.0 Traveling north on the Blue Ridge Parkway, we will begin counting our mileage at the Parkway overpass crossing Virginia Route 8. This junction is located between Parkway Mile Post 165 and 166. 00.1 (0.1) Turn left off of the Parkway (if you're heading north) onto the exit ramp, leading to Route 8. 00.2 (0.1) At this stop sign, we will turn right onto Route 8, toward Floyd, Virginia. 06 l 1 (5-9) This traffic light marks the intersection of Route 8 and US 221, in the small town of Floyd, Virginia. Floyd, with a population of approximately 450, is the county seat of Floyd County. Folks who like a small town atmosphere where window shopping and smiling faces are abundant will love this charming commun...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

BACKROADS Continued from page 26. MFaHjHB Wk '■■ < .<• lm^'' The ruins of the old Sowers Mill. Mile 20.3. into Floyd County. 18.7 (0.1) Just after crossing the bridge, we will turn left onto state road 663• 20.3 (1.6) We are now at the end of state road 663 and on our left is the old Sowers Mill. Not much is left of the old mill now, but once it was a thriving mountain business. From here we will turn around and backtrack to state road 617. 21.9 (1.6) At this stop sign, we turn right onto state road 617 22.0 (0.1) At this stop sign, we turn right, continuing to follow state road 617 across a small steel bridge. 22.6 (0.6) This high ridge area is known as Laurel Ridge and the views are beautiful. 23.6 (1.0) A typical old mountain store building is on our left here. 24 • 1 (0.5) State road 616 turns right here, but we go straight, continuing on state road 617. 24.2 (0.1) State road 617 bears to the left here, but we will go to the right on state road 677 and re-e...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 May 1985

th y $3 HEARTOF THE BLUE RIDGE r\ounmn vmi w *•"'' j. Copyright 1984 Laurel Publications Inc. 1985 jigt&UFSl' Monthly Journal of Mountain Life A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads MBACKROAI^ mountains never get to see the really pretty places that are hidden away on mountain back roads. As residents who love and appreciate a stream gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite spots with you. This month our BACKROAD tour will begin and end at the junction of the Blue Ridge Parkway and Virginia Route 8 at Tuggles Gap, Virginia (Parkway Mile Post 165.2). We will travel a total of 61.7 miles and will need to alot between two and three hours for the entire drive. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total distance we've traveled from our point of beginning to that point on our tour. The numbers in pare...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 June 1985

JUNE 1985 Monthly Journal of Mountain Life THE DAY GRANDMA GOT HER NEW WASHER Grandma's mind was made up. She was going to buy a washing machine. Since she could remember she had gathered the dirty clothes, carried them across the road down under the hill to the creek, filled the iron pot with water and heated it over a hot fire. She dropped lye soap into the pot so it would melt and make suds. After the water was hot she scrubbed the white clothes on the washboard first and then she did the colored ones. She washed on the creek bank in the shade of the willow trees so she didn't have to carry water up the hill. Then my grandmother and I carried the wet clothes up the hill and I helped her hang the clothes on the line. One day she confided to me that she had been saving her butter-and-egg money for a washing machine. "Grat's getting tired of helping me," she said. "He says it's women's work. Last week I caught him burning some of his socks in the fire to keep from washing them. " Sh...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 June 1985

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JUNE, 1985 MOUNTAIN MUSICIAN HORTON © COPYRIGHT 1985 I became interested in "old time" music at an early age and taught myself to play the guitar. Recently, I was talking to 68 year old Abe Horton of Fancy Gap, Virginia, a vetran old time performer. He has a room full of trophies, ribbons and awards he has earned over the years. Abe has recorded three albums and I will give information at the end of this story about how to order them. The following story is taken directly from a tape I made of our conversation and the words are written exactly the way they sound when Abe says them to give you a feeling of the flavor of Abe's personality. I hope you will feel like you are sitting there listening to Abe yourself as you read it. I hope this interview will help to revive an interest in old time mountain music. This is his story. Abe, tell me a little bit about when you first started out playing music. "I'z 'tween 5 and 6 year old l un I started playin' the banjer'...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 June 1985

ABE HORTON Continued from page 2. style Abe uses]. In clawhammer, you usin 1 your thumb and all your fingers. Some people calls it frailin 1 the banjer, but that's the wrong word." Abe laughs, "I just call hit clawhammerin' the banjer." You've played for a lot of square dances, etc. Anything you'd like to tell me about the differences between the style of dancing back then and the way it is now? "Well, now, when 1 1 ze just a kid, my mother and daddy would let me go if I'd just stay in the corner and just play music. That 'uz back when they danced the Virginia Reel. This square dancin' they do now is not like it was back when I'ze young and makin' music. I've played for many a square dance. I wouldn't want to start in to try to count up how many I played at. Back then, if you won'nt a good flatfoot dancer, you just won'nt in it. [Yeah, Annie Mae adds, because when you went around the reel and you come down through and you got down here to the end, you had to dance, and if you couldn...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 June 1985

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JUNE, 1985 JOHN HAYES HOLLOW © COPYRIGHT 1985 By: Hazel Hedrick Aunt Texie, my daddy's only sister was a natural born comedian and prankster. She was the youngest of a family of six chaps. She was picked on constantly by her five mischievous brothers, but was Grandad' s pet. She had to learn how to protect herself at an early age. I heard her tell many stories of her brothers trying to get her in trouble and how she turned the joke back on them. One day in the fall of the late 1800's, Aunt Texie was about six, seven or eight years old then, Grandad told Uncle Flate and Belo (my dad) to hitch up the steer to the cart and go up on the mountain and fetch a load of apples. Little sister wanted to go along and ride in the cart. Gandad gave his approval and Aunt Texie crawled in the cart. Her brothers didn't wish to be bothered with her, but they knew there was no use to tell Grandad, so they drove the steer through briar thickets and over rocks and ditches until th...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 June 1985

GROWING UP ON TOGGLES CREEK "LIGHTNING STRIKES TWICE" On the hot muggy morning of June 22, 1910, my father rose early and prepared to make his rounds of delivering the mail on what was then Route 2 in Floyd County. There was something ominous and foreboding in the atmosphere even as early as six o'clock, but the mail had to be delivered. As the morning wore on, dark thunderclouds began to bulge up in almost every direction. Higher and higher they grew and darker and more threatening. Toward afternoon, the lightening began to play back and forth between those enormous clouds and deep rolls of thunder grew and grew into a great crescendo of rumbling sound. Dad had completed the first half of his route and was only a few hundred yards beyond the Bill Boyd place [located on what is now state road 609 in Patrick County], when he saw a huge THE COUNTRY l STORE By Wm. Axley Allen None of life's experiences can quite compare to that of sitting on a stool or straight back chair in a country ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 June 1985

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JUNE, 1985 ROBERT M. SIZEMORE 1879-1939 AN INDUSTRIOUS MAN The Sizemore family has been traced from Lunenberg County, Virginia in the 1790' 5. From there, John Sizemore moved to Stokes County, North Carolina, near the Patrick County, Virginia line in 1796. His son, Levi (born 1828) moved to Carroll County, Virginia in the Center Valley Community. Levi's son, Daniel was born in 1853- Daniel's son, Robert M. , better known as Bob, was born September 30, 1879- Bob married Laura A. Frost and they eventually had four children. In 1914, Bob moved to the Laurel Community of Carroll County. In 1915, his son Everette was born. Today, Everette Sizemore is 69 years old and tells his father 's story. "My father was a big, strong man. When he moved here to Laurel Community in 1914-, he bought this piece of land, about 70 acres. It already had an old house, a steam powered grain mill and a sawmill and orchard on the "property ." Bob Sizemore was an industrious man who kept ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 June 1985

ROBERT SIZEMORE Continued from page 6. hillside. They would dig holes there, line them with oak leaves and fill with apples. They would keep crisp that way til May. The worst thing Everette can remember happening to his father had to do with an apple tree. It was the middle of February and an ice and snow storm had uprooted one of the apple trees. Bob Sizemore decided to try to get it back in the ground. He was cutting off broken branches to reset it when he made a mis-lick and cut one of his fingers completely off except for the skin on one side of it. He held -it together with his other hand and rushed into the house. While Bob held his finger tight to his hand his wife put Cloverine salve on it and wrapped it around and around with a clean white cloth. That cloth was not removed until the finger was completely recovered, which it did. So completely in fact, that it worked like his other fingers and wasn't even stiff! If Bob Sizemore was hardy, he was also strong. At one time, he ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 June 1985

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JUNE, 1985 SOUR WOOD MOUNTAIN My great grandfather Smith lived on the side of Barrett's Mountain, in the south range of the Brushy Mountains. "Grandpa" lived there with a son, Jerry, who was a bachelor, and both of these men were very special to me. As a youngster, I had lived with my grandparents, who were "Mom" and "Dad" to me, and Grandpa was often a guest in our house, or we in his. Grandpa died while I was in basic training as a paratrooper during the Korean conflict. I was unable to get home for the funeral, but they said it was a bitter cold day with heavy snow. He was around 95 when he died - in the outhouse, as a matter of fact. Uncle Jerry moved down from the mountain soon afterwards, and a few years later he died in a tragic house fire. The house in which Grandpa and Jerry lived was a small, fourroom dwelling, perched on the side of the mountain. There was almost as much space under the house as inside. A spring was located about 50 yards above the ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 June 1985

ELIZABETH'S JOURNAL 1842-1848 The following is an excerpt from a journal kept by Elizabeth Cooley McClure of Carroll County, Virginia from 1542 (she was 17 then) until her death in IB4S. Her journal not only reflects the day to day world she and her family lived in, but a young girl's hopes and expectations for the future. A special thanks to the Cooley family for sharing it with us. 21st. [April, 1846] Yesterday we traveled 21 miles, crossed Clinch River crossing Cumberland Mountains, camped on the bank of a creek near a large tree..romantic and beautiful place. Had fish &c. All our baked bread is gone and butter and sugar. We have come clear through Knoxville and Anderson Counties and are now in Morgan, 9 miles from Montgomery. Very warm indeed. All in the burning sun, talking about swaping horses. Think it a long ways to Texas, but tolerable spirits. 22nd. Still on the Cumberland, the roughest road I ever saw. The land is poor here. The sun shines warm, the atmosphere...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 June 1985

PAGE 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JUNE, 1985 GOOD PEOPLE I HAVE KNOWN By: William P. Swart z, Jr. Probably Carroll County gained prominence the quickest of any county in Virginia at the time of the courthouse tragedy. At the same time, the county residents chose to avoid the subject. My mother never wanted to talk about it. This was understandable. It was a traumatic event. The Allen family was not unknown. In fact, my mother attended a summer normal at one time when Sidna Allen was in the class. I came to know him in the years before he died. The first time I met him was in 1927. After he had been pardoned and released from serving the remainder of his sentence. For several years he traveled and exhibited the novelty furniture that he had made during his time in the penetentiary. It was while he was doing this that I first came to know him. He would come to a city, rent a vacant store room, set up his exhibit and advertise in the local newspaper that he would be showing his furniture for a w...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 June 1985

GOOD PEOPLE I HAVE KNOWN Continued from page 10. card down, the two detectives had two pistols against their man's head. The three then went to the boarding house where, with the information newly obtained, they soon had their second man and the case was ended. These two were the last of the participants in the tragedy and there the excitement ended. Their trial, conviction and sentencing was big headline news in all the newspapers, but as Judge Draper said, "By the time Allen and Edwards were brought to trial, a year had passed, things were back to normal and although there was much trial publicity, the actual trial went pretty much in a routine manner." I am sure I knew other details, but years have passed and I am now at an elderly age. Details are not as clear to me as they were at one time. I recount them as best I can. Two of my most cherished friends whom I have mentioned previously, were Mack and Tucker Goad. Their father was the Clerk of the Court at the time of the tragedy...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 June 1985

PAGE 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL" JUNE, 1985 THE VALUE OF LIFE © COPYRIGHT 1985 When I was 12 years old, I would accompany my 20 year old brother and one or two of his friends to a pine thicket across the pasture from our house. The trees were growing so close together that in order to move among them, we would have to get on our hands and knees and crawl. The trees were not over 15 feet tall and each evening at sundown, hundreds of birds of all kinds would descend among the branches to roost for the night. It was at sundown when we would move through the thicket with 22 caliber pistols killing the birds. As it grew dark, the birds would become too confused to seek shelter elsewhere and we could only fire at their silhouettes against the darkening sky. The fluttering wings of dying birds echoed beneath the pines as it grew too dark for us to see our targets and we made our way out of the thicket and headed home. Killing was neither new nor a novelty to me at 12 years old. By the time I was s...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
x
Loading...
x
x