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Title: Seymour Express And Goulburn Valle... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,508 items from Seymour Express And Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook And Yea Advertiser, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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EATING BEFORE SLEEPING. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

EATING BEFORE SLEEPING. I All animals except man eat before sleep and there is no reason why ian ishotld form an exception to the rule. Fasting during the long interval between supper and breakfast, and epuecialy the complete emptiness of the stomach during sleep, add great lv to the amount of emaciation. sleep lessness and general weakness so often met with. - it is well kIown (says the *"'atn dy Doctor') that is the body there is a perpetual isintegratiou of tissue- sieeptg or waking. It is, therefore, natural to believe that the supply of nourishment should be somewhat con tinuounas epecially in those in whom the viita fit i lowered. As bodily ex erc-e ise suspended during sleep, wita wear and ;ear correspondingrl dimin hshed, while digetio assimilation, and nutritive activit continue as nsual, tie food furnished dturing this peroi iai more than is de`rouyed, and increased weight and mpr-oved gen eral viyour is the result. If the weakly, he emaciated, and the sleepless were to ta...

THE WHEEL OF FORTUNE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

THE WHEEL OF FORTUNE. An interesting article in 3MClure's is one by Mr U. N. Williamson on -"S~st ;s and System-Players t Mon i.. :itilre- d resort has been de sc=_... a i Arden of Eden and lik e.s.tI usto a Hell upon Earth. The spitr- of evil may be the only-nexus, buh w:hether for pleasure or excitement, M3tert. CaroT continues to attract an maz:ing tasnrmrnent of men and wormen froat rih four corners of the earth. rChe r.:ots no~ble, if not the most pic tlures-ec, almongsit these are undoubt cd.y the system-players. Ir Williamson -:ws *:s an odd glimpse of these hope Sul o,:- .A little after nine'o'clock in the = -rnr:ng a stranger wou!d besurprised to see a crowd, composed mostly of man. s~oemnly assembled on the pave: ment across the road opposite the Ca sino. They look more like business men wiciting for a suburban trin to take them .to the city than gay Riri era idlers. Their faces are intent, thoruh nct visibly anxious. They talt little to their neighbours, and laugh TIcs. 1...

DISCRIMINATION IN CULLING. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

DISCRIMINATIONJN CULLING. The only profitable course to take where the dairy does not yield a fair proft is to fEn out whether the cows are inherentlr., and consequently hope lesly, inferior, or whether their low rate of production is due to the condi ticai under which they are kept. If the conditions are not favorable, the first thing to do is to improve them. Then if the cows seem to be well and are contented with their surroundings bot still fail to be productive, care.ul examination in changing their food should be made. The present rations may keep them in good health, ye; mnay not enable them to produce large quantities of milk. Or the kind of feed may be right, but the Quantite may not be sufficient to maintain the cow and leave a surplus from which, mink can be made. It is from liberal feeding that a large part of the profit of the dairy c mes. If one has cows that are onlyr paying their way, or perhaps not quite doing that it will be well to try all that in 'most cases the ...

FIGHTING TUBERCULOSIS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

FZGUrflNo T3saRCULOSm The wise man who has any reason to fear his own susceptibility to tuberca losis will elirivate a liking for outdoor reoreation. > Gardening. perhaps is the best of all. on however humble a scale it might be. The town worker, when he can afford it; should make a practice of going into the country for teek-eCds. All ill-ventilated and-stuffy places-as, for example, pubiL meet irA of all kinds, musc halls and pub Ih houses, etc., and in many cases, too. friends' houses-should be avoided. The consumptive is warned against taking another's advice as to the cli mate which will suit him best. For some a bracing air is the best erd icr others a relaxing climate. Som. are best at sea, others are better :n land. While there is no panacea in any particular place or climate, the thing to avoid is a damp-holding or ill drained subsoil or clay. A soil of gravel or sand should be the objective. The main point, if the consumptive needs idvice on this point. is' that he h"ni...

800 DOLLARS FOR A UTILITY HEN [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

8.00 DOLLARS FOR A UTILITY IEN "The Reliable PouRter Journal" (Am erican) prints the following: - "Lady Show You." a hen which won the na tioal egg-laying contest at the" State Poultry Station at Mountain Grove 3Mo., this year, was sold here (Spring ield) for b00 dollars (£:160) by J. A. Bickerdike, of Millersville. 3.. - The hen hr a a record of ~SI fnll-weight eggs this year. "Lady Show You" is a white Plymouth Rock." The above lispatch was clipped from a daily news paper. We are not sure about the 5O0 dollars feature of this news item. but, strange to say, the other points -eem to he correct. The hen referred to is a white Plmouth Reeock. She bas been named ~Lady Show Yon," and ini the en-laying contest at Monn tain Grove, Mo.. she produced ,27 no linal-sized. normal-shaped, marketabhle gs in 365 consecutive daysa Whether ar not a hen with this record of egg preductiveness is worth 00 dollars ii a question. It is a question of who is to own tEr, of what he is to do with her, or h...

WHERE PRETTY GIRLS ARE UNFORTUNATE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

WHERE PRETTY GIRLS ARE UNFORTUNATE. Plitty -irLs are not entirely to be envied. They mar be much admir in. aid all that, but rhete is always a pr-jadiee against them. They are aeldo:n taken seriously? but exvect ed to be frivolous and shallow. A man does now and again honour a pretty girl with serious considera tion: but. in the majority of cases, it .is the pvain girl he settles on for a wife. The pretty eirl is sure to be s:nbjeet to ecnv and a -ood deal of the nmalice *n' other women. An ~ther fearful aandicap is that she is always ex:.ted to look pretty. and does not ?,- any credit for be i. beautiful (tie is on the look out for her- looks to begin to "Ca of." or for an unbScominr dress or hat. In other lords. she is observ ed-when she ,.- s not look her best The plain air! on the-other land. is not expected t- be pretty. and if she does wear a becoming costume everybody comments on it. and she gets more admiration than does the air! who'is" always pretty. There is a lend. too. ...

GOOSEBERRY JAM [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

GOOSEBERRY -JIA Time h--nr_ nth- loaf <,rfac to lib. re-d n herrir s Pick cuff 't.tjks aryl bd ;mm fr H =n=rri~ hruiF the, !fight` hoit them qrijckk for eiclr or te:t minuots. stirrir` adr te time then d. m-iz-. .mindedI and Siited4 to b-o-"* hail *tr !ic remor~inz son as it rises. Pit intn poto w rhie hoat then call cvrer. All jams are mad: munch in the laine wav_

THE DAIRY INSPECTOR'S VISIT. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

(THE DAIRY INSPECTOR'S VISIT. The following squib from a contemu porary is amusing; but in publishing it we do not imply that it is in an sense characteristic: Inspector: "I have called. Mrs. D to inspect 'your dairy herd Hou many cows are you milkinn?" Mrs. D--: "Let me see. T'Jre i Peagy, and Blossom, Beauty, and Roany. Spot do have two blind teats; so she don't count.' Inspector (impatiently) : "I am nol interested in the names of your herd. I wish to know how many cows yot Mrs D-: "I don't milk; Jim does the milking." Inspector: "Well, how many cows does Jim milk-?" Mrs. D- : "Four, if you count 'Spot." Inspector: "Are you aware if there is any infectious disease in your dairy herd-cancer, tuberculosis, o staggers?" Mrs. D- : "Now, when I come to think of it, Jim told me Blossom had pendicitis' from eating green guavas. lie said she had the staggers.' Jim advised me to get a bottle of square sin; it was a certain cure. Now, would you believe itt Two hours after Jim gave the cow ...

THE LARGEST ICE CAVE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

TI1L LAnGEST ICE CAVE. A few years ago some members : the Austrian Speleological Society dis coverer] in the "Dachstein mountains some oaverns which airo amongst the largest in Europe. One of these grot toes, the longitudinal axis of which is fully 6500ft. long, moreover, turned out to offer additional interest by its truly enormous ice masses, and 'was found to be the largest known ice cave in the world. Though a scorching sun may be burning outside on. the bare mountain rock, there is always an icy wind blowing through this underworld, freezing everything within its ieach. Only sometinmes, when the outside tem pcrature ranges between 32:and 41deg. iCnt., aind-a comparatively \arin rain penetrates through the. fissures of the rook. enterirg right into the cavern, will there be a temporary calm and dis tinctr melting of the ice. The Dach stein ice cave comprises several domes filled with ice, which communicate with one another through a number of fro zen galleries. mAn ice crevice '...

Rheumatism. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

Rheumatism. Rihe?uatism. tradition says. can be r-e:rc-e by earrzn-_ig in the po.-ket the Lsne of the hirddoek that ies runder the mar:- of Christ fingers-the two rotrud bacek tinrks on each side of the body s-uppc--?d to hare been caused by our I :,i's fin=ers when He itfted the F-h out: of the water in order to take thir tribute-mtoney from its me-nti'. Thi Lane has many other -irtn?, and always w-ork; rooed to its owner; br;t it nm::` not be e'xhitited. and t s ts:I:li. never he brit or toueh e:?. or eve: -evr:c-y i;n:y after the poe -essor gets it T i rdi-ns of La , -mdor L: e:e ct-t they can cure i?nth-c'he by rwe:,ri haddoc k' none aro:und the neeCk. - while Lord Bcra say ---t "-we::rina on the ite ger ri-- :;e of se:-horse iFeth" tit: cIustnr ef the t-:i:aitft of Asi ':e Turkey to cole- t cr?yryil at the time o the yearr Then they were in the est -aonto ,tin-"'.,i place them in .-:rt,, pits in the re:mnd. Here they w- erec rken no and allowe- io re mi:: -rIl t-e rwint.-. It t...

MAN-EATING FOXES. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

MIAN-EATING FOXES -..; That the fox say be a man-eater appears from experience iii' 'Uppei *Piedmoni;. Italy,: A; young woman, ao customed, to wander in the minountaiha gorges, disappeared; and after n titme somergrtioles of. clothidj belonging to. her, surrounded with footprints of foxes were discovered at a point nearly- a mile above sealevel: As there were, n.o other tracks, it.was concluded that, while'sttpefied by cold or fatigue, the woman, mist have been attacked. and eaten by these animals. Fond Mamma: Isn'.t balby gettihE big? ' Just see how-solid lie is!" Papna: "He does-seem solid this- morning, .and it's remarkable, because he appeared ti be all 'holler' last nigb.t;"

HUMUS IN THE WHEAT AREAS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

EUMUs IN THE WHEAT AREA. Speaking at the Tnenty-fourth An nual Congres of the AgrienItural Ba. cau of South Australia. Professor Low rie sail: "It r-ed ze te argued that if plety rof phosphate: were put on the !nd,- srch a wealth of herbage would ntrio? that the or-ane natter or hu urn would I kept up. That. however, fa_ not proved to be the ease with the r ca who faleko- clean. When the ?rop i-- cut for ha the Q.is??ion of snIply ig hmuns is not a diceult one. The - sbbIe ean be ploughed and worked •-tu. and. a crop q own for feed. It myr be barley cats, rape and mustard. peas, end in somre di trietf?ltalian rye gass If the tractors which are being intro duccd will enable the farmer to plough, roerk up anr prepare for sowing about 15 or '? acres a day, they are the im pi-sents which South Australian con ditic:s require. These owuld enasle the farmers to go over the stubbles at the s~oe time that the tears are sowing If the faHowling i done to ntre there is not the addition of organ...

FOR THE FARMER'S WIFE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

FOR THE FARMER'S WIFE. Folding Skirts for Travelling.-Fas ten the waistband and pin the 'middlh of the back to the 'centro of tihe front. Thenou lay the skirt out flat on the table, and, with two pieces of. tissue paper as foundritions, roll the skirt over and over towards the ontre, first .f rom tli right side of the skirt, then from the left, so forming two rolls thri lio parallel to each other. If lthl garment has to be folded crosswiso tt adliit of its biing packed in suit-case or trunk, place a wad of tissue paper or newspaper underneath the creases. Skirts so packed take very little room, and show no traces of travelling -in. a small c0:,mpass. BAKED FISH AND TOMATOES. lButter a piedish, and.:put a layer of filleted haddock, plaioe, or solo in it. Sprinkle over the fish a little peppe, and salt, and a few drops of lemon juice. Cut someine tomatoes in slices, and put a layer of these, next edding a little pepper and salt. Fill your dish in this way, finishing wivh a good layer ...

HENS AND COCKERELS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

BZES .-AD X £CKERIAB. There are two factors in the fattei-= ing of poultry. First. the need of a "contents spirit? and: second, the use of such foods as most quickly add the desired fat. The real object .-of fattening poultry is to make the mar keted product - more tender. The birds need to be fattened as quicklv as possible. Delay in selling, too long feeding of tie fat-makinfg for-d, is likely to injure the bird. Between two and three weeks is required to p.t the hens and coekerels into prime market conditiop. Reduce amount of required exercise day by day. Linmit range of the hens. Better confine in small pens, or coops, so the birds will to little more than eat and put on -fat. The farmer .will hardly have birds enough to practice forced feed ing. He will get the best market -mdition by the use of a~nash and ,rain. A 'ash mixture of t oee arts cornmeal, two ground 'oats, one hran, to be fed wet mixed for sevent days, then -ieaing out the bran forthe se rond week. If'Feb can get p...

FEEDING CALVES. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

FEEDING CALVES. Clover blay is the best to keep before the young calf es soon as it will beg:n to eat. Pea and oat hay is also good. :When the' calf is fuir' or- five months old-- a little lucerne imay be given, but care should be taken not to feed too much, as there is danger of thi lucerne causing scours. ' To raise calves with- out any skimmilk is not very satisfac toiy, althologh there are some good c:ili meals on the market, but will .not take the place of skim-mnilk entirely. it has been suggeste&tliat after a calf is tivw or three weeks old, -a bean soup may. be givcn, which. is prepared as follows:--Parboil the beans in soda, then drain off the water and boil again until .soft; squeeze through a colander ind "aild salt until the soup has a de cidedly brackish taste. Then stir in some pollard. arnd linseed-meal, and add lukewarm' water until each calf receives about three quarts of the mixture. Of course tlioheamount to be given will vary with the different calves. Wh...

THE RULING PASSIGH. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

THE RULIHG PASSIG?H. - Two women leaned over the backyar" fenre. j - . (The same old fence) as tihe s?u went down. While each told the other, in con - E dnce. The scandals shed gathered about the town. For women must gossip, or they cani't eleep; They think that secrets weren't made to keep; So they lean on the fence in the gloaming. Two women leaned over the garden gate In the evening glow as the sun went down They wondered what made thir hus bands so late, And they sneered at the minister's wife's new gown. For women delight in a friendly chat, Without it their lives-would be stale and flat; So they lean -on the gate in the gloaming. - Two husbands came home from their golfing game, (From the office, they said) a` the s:n: went down. Both ready and eager to hear the same Sweet scandals their wives had hunt ed down. For men. though they work, love nos sip, too; And that's why their wives seek something new, And they meet and talk in the glonm

ACTION OF GRASS ON TREES. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

ACTION OF GRASS ON TREES. In. Lho latest number of Science Flo gross is an article by Mr Spencer r. ering, F.lt.S., director of the Woburn Experimental i'ruit Farm, Engeah.· giving the results of a series of cx haustlve experiments to determinz a :.. olfects produced by growing grass above the roots of fruit trees. In this country, the deleterious efikct of grass on trees is generally recognised, and commenrcial orchards are, as a rule, carefully cultivated, but in England, there is considerable difference of pin ioi and practice, grassed orchards, be ing not uncom?mon, although intensive fruit growing, with clean cultivat.an. the latest liliase of the industry. The chief reason for this divergence of opin ion Mr i'ickering believes to lie in FIe fact that effect produced by grass varies greatly according to the nature of the soil, and, in some few cases, Imay ::. be negligible; the grassing of the land is also generally carried out gradualdy whllicl materially reduces the evil ef f...

A NEW JERSEY CHAMPION. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

A NEW JERSEY CHAMPION. "What is the highest" record we can expect a dairy cow to make?" is a query that has often been made. As it was with the trotting horse, 20 or 3f: years ago, when animals began to. ap pear that could trot a-mile in less than three minutes, for instance, Maude S., making a record of 2.10, many thought that the speed limit of the horse had been reached, and so it was with the dairy cow. When Yeksa Sunbeam, a Guernsey, made her phenomenal' re cord of 857 pounds of fat in one year, it was doubted by many who had not studied the breeding of dairy cows closely that her record would scarcely be equalled, if ever excelled. Not long after this. Colantha 4th's Jolmnna, a Holstein, medo 998 pounds of fat, excel ling Yeksa Sunbealm's record by 141 pounds of fat. Here the world's re cord remained for several years, but it was final:y displaced by. Banostine Belle Do NKl, who made in one year 1058.34 pounds of fat. Jacoba Irene, with a yearly record of 095 lbs of fat held t...

A DEAL IN DALMATIANS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

A DEAL IN DALMATIANS: - A gentlemen went into a shop "i BUirmingham and told the proprietor that ihe wanted to buy a Dalmatian dog to take abroad with him. "Certainly, sir;" said the assistant. "J've got the very thing."' .In a quarter of an hour he brought out the animal; tho customer paid the. money aiid departed. Before his train time, ihowever, a heavy shower fell. The' gentlemen returned with the dog in a state of indignation. "Look at him i" he cried. "You told me he was a Dalaintian. Give me my money back., All his spots are wshedl off in the rain." The 'proprietor apologised. "It's all tlhat:stupid fool's mistake."' He called to his assistant. "James, did you sell this do. - to this gentleman P" "Yes?, sir." : ."Well, you ought to be ashamed o yourself. Don't you know 'an -um brella goes with this dog?"

LUCERNE HAY. HOW BEST MADE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 20 February 1914

LUCERNE HAY. - HOW BEST MADE. To turn green lucerne into good keep ing hay is a matter about which farmers frequently ask for guidance. Accord ing to it Bulletin issued by one of thli -American experiment stations, luoerno intended for hay should be cut when it begins to bloom. The leaves, which are much richer in protein than. the stems, drop and shatter worse in cut ting if the plants are allowed to ma ture too much before harvesting. It has also been observed that when cut at the beginning of the bloom period. about one-tenth in bloom--the next crop,, under favorable conditions, starts quickly and makes rapid headwuy. Tlin most important faotor in making good hay is-favorablo weather. HI.y exposed to excessive rains, especially that from leguminous plants, is greatly injured in quality and feeding value. Every farmer knows that hay is injured by rain and dew, which cause it to bleach and mould, and take from it the natural aroma and palatibility essen tial' in hay of good quality...

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