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Title: Dunmunkle Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,667 items from Dunmunkle Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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High Temperatures and the Eye. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 17 April 1914

High Temperatures and the Eye. The naked -eye has always been tho moans omploj-od for indicating high temperature, such as the melt ing of metals or healing them for rolling or forging. Until the py rometer niado its appearance (says the "ITardwarcman") tho eye was the only method omployed for de termining the temperature. While more or less inaccurnlc and suscep tible to the personal equation, tho eye is still used in the majority of cases. The following table will serve to indicate the temperature of a body as shown l>y its colour :— Dog. C. "Peg. l'\ First visible red 525 977 Dull red heat 700 1292 Turning to cherry ... 800 1472* Actual cherry red ... 000 ;1652 Bright cherry rod ... 1000 3832 Dull orange 1100 2021 Bright orange 1200 2192 White heat ..; ... ... 1300 -''2372 Bright white heat ... 1-100 2552 Dazzling white heat ... 1500 2732 This table is after that of Pouil let, and the colour will depend upon tho person, as judged by the eye, and, which is more important, the s...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO CLEAN STRAW. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 17 April 1914

TO CL15AN STRAW. | To clean while straw luils rub I willi a slice of cut lemon, rinse j with cold water, anil stiffen by j brushing with a brush dipped in I a weak .solution of gum aiui i Wider. Black straw hats .shouti^be I horuiighly brushed to remove dust, then painted ovet with a mixture of equal portions of gum and ink. l'olitienl Candidate : "Gentlemen, my opponent luiun't got a leg to stand on.". Voice : "All the more reason why he should have the seat, mister

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EMERGENCY MAGNIFYING GLASS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 17 April 1914

EMERGENCY MAGNIFYING ' GLASS. When in need of a microscope, for the study of botany, ono may bo, made in tlio following manner : Bend a small wire or the stem of a leaf so as to form a small loop Loop Enclosing a Drot> of Water uot larger than the ordinary drop of water. When this is done place a drop of clear water ill (lie loop nml the microscope is complete. This temporary device will prove valu able where a strong' magnifying glass is not at hand.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Food of the Kestrel. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 17 April 1914

Food of the Kestrel. , : During a peregrination (says a correspondent) iir (he island of Mull I was attractod by a kestrel hawk flying out, from a rock. After a .somewhat diligent search, there being many rock?, I discovered the eyrie, and in it wore three young kestrels at that atngo when tho brown feathers arc showing fairly well among the white down. Think-' ing this was an admirable oppor tunity of seeing what nro the food supplies of theec birds, I hid at a distance to note what tho pnrotits brought to their nestlings. Even with my binoculars, however, I was unable to discover, and the follow ing dny I adopted different tactics. Shooting some young rabbits llagnin ; approached tho oyrie, when the pa rent birds were away. As in tho habit of these birds of prey, the young ones faced mo with open beak and claw's, but after I had dropped bits of warm meat into their open mouths they naturally, after feeling and tasting tho tit bits, swallowed them, and, liko Oliver Twist, were read...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
You Cannot be "Strong" Armed without "Strong" Jaws. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 17 April 1914

You Cannot be "Strong" Armed without "Strong" Jaws. — (By LEONARD K. HTHSHBERG, A.M., M.r>. In the primeval days, when the present and before the present me mories of man runneth not to tho contrary, of the Pleistocene man, tho anthropoid, and homo^imlan pre cursors, if not ancestors, (lie ques tion of pabulum varied according to j the progress of tho animal kingdom] toward tho .superman. More and raoro steadily it approached the j much-coveted animal victuals, con sisting of Insects, grubs, reptiles, eggs, birds, and smaller game. Gradually flesh-eating replaced the non-carnivorous diet, and soon hunt ing and fishing vied with the tilled soil and tho vineyards. Finally lifts was really made worth while by the inventor of cooking. The in troduction of cooking, like all new inventions, even of the present day, led at once to an over-consumption of the thing thus plnce.l enticingly within the reach of nil. Man soon and since then began eating himself into liriglit's disease, cirrho...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOME-MADE POT COVERS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 17 April 1914

HOME-MADE TOT COVERS. Empty thread spools and the tins used ns extra inside covers in lard cans aro usually thrown a way, but thoso can bo put to good use as kettlo covcrs, if they are made up as follows : Saw the spool in half as shown, make a hole in the centre of the tin and run a screw. or nail through the spool- and the tin ; then flatten its end on . the under side. 'Phis will make an ex-, cellont cover for a pot.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BANBURY BISCUITS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 17 April 1914

BANBURY BISCUITS. In a basin mix Goz. .of 'flour and 2oz. of cornflour, adding to these 3oz. of castor sugar, a quarter _ of a teospoonful of halting powder, and a pinch of salt., With the tips of the fingers crumble in finely ^ib. of butter, afterwards adding 'SJ.oz. of currants, washed; dried, and picked. Moisten these ingredients to a stilt dough with a tfell-boaten egg ; and then turn out, knead well, and roll out thinly.- • The dough cut int.o | rounds the $izc. of a breakfastcup, the round;being jjlftccd on a greased tin, and baked .in a moderate oven until" they become a pale yellow co lour. , As a rule these biscuits take about a quarter of an hour to" fire.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DIGESTIVE BISCUITS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 17 April 1914

DIGESTIVE BISCUITS. For these biscuits the principal constituent is wheaten meal, and ilb. of this meal is first mixed in a basin with a pinch of baking soda, a quarter o_f a teaspoonful of salt, and a dessert-spoonful of castor sugar. Then into these in grcciieuts crumble finely "3oz. of butter, or, if preferred, loz. of drip ! ping and ~ 2oz. of butter will do instead. Work all these ingredients into. a very stjff paste with a little sweet milk", knead well, roll out, and cut into rounds the size of a teacup. Then' placG the rounds, on a' greased tin, "-prick them with a forlc, and bake in a moderate oven for a quarter |of au hour.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SHREWSBURY BISCUITS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 17 April 1914

SHREWSBURY BISCUITS, i Iii a basin beat to a cream 4oss. of butter with 4oz. of castor sugar. Mix in -a plate Jib. of flour with a quarter of a tenspoonful ®f bak ing powder and a pinch of salt1. Having next well bealeu an egg, add to it a few drops of lemon flavouring.' Alternately add to the ■ beaten cx'ca.iiti'"of bullet- and sugar the dry ingredients in small quan tities with the beaten egg until all is used up. Knead the dough lightly, roll out thinly, and cut into both oval arid" crescent shapes. | This is done •'by first cutting out the rounds, theiv^by cutting each round I in two-' with- the-'cutter—a crescent and oval shape .being thus obtain ed from each round. ria/:e those on a greased tin,"' and bake in a very moderate . oven ' fdr a quarter of an hour.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE DAIRY CHEDDAR CHEESE BACTERIOLOGY. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 24 April 1914

THE DAIRY —.—f CHEDDAR CHEESE BACTERIO LOGY. "Tho Bacteriology of Ohrrddn r Cheese" is the title of Bulletin ISO of j U.S. Department of Agriculture. Th~ investigations described were condur ted by 15. G. Hastings, of Wisconsin Experiment Station ; Alice C. TCvans. of tho Dairy Division ; and K. 1>. Hart, of Wisconsin. The effort was to ,throw more light upon.the role play ed l>y micro-organisms in the pre parations and ripening of cheese, nn l the results of the investigations are summarised as follows : 1. From the same - raw , materials, various kind of cheese arc prepared, which differ especially in flavour. Th* factors that determine whether n cheese to. be prepared from a given" mass of milk, rennet, and salt is to be of one kind or another are to be found in the methods of the cheese maker, who is able to vary in one way or another the composition of the cheese, with the result that con ditions are established that favour ,or retard the growth of the groups of micro-org...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE FARM. WESTERN WOLTHS GRASS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 24 April 1914

THE FARM. WESTERN WOLTHS GRASS. (Extracted from the Journal of De partment of Agriculture.) "A great wealth of forage, 15 ton.' to the acrc, is at present being cut for stock-feed at the Ruakurn Farrc of Instruction. It is the Westerr Wolths grass, a variety of *rye-grass said to have originated from apl.int plucked by the wayside by a Dutch peasant. At Uuakura it has undoubt edlj given the heaviest yield of al! rye-grasses, making a rapid dense growth and providing excellent spring feed, admirably adapted for cutting and carting 0ut to stock. Sown or the 14th' of May, it was nvwiv for feeding about the beginning of Octo ber. It Is generally considered t hat n legume and non-legume combination such as peas and oats, is the mo'1 desirable green crop, but this will give but a very poor second cut. Western Wolths, on the other h^n-d. provides several excellent subsetiiipn* cuttings. Undoubtedly a grass whic'i in a very wet season will give an abundance of feed at a critical time for da...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CORRECTING FAULTS IN YOUNG CALVES. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 24 April 1914

CORRECTING FAULTS IN YOUNG - CALVES. • One of the most difficult habits to overcome where a number of young [ calves are running in a loose box is that of sucking one another, writes an English correspondent. There is a wide difference of opinion regarding the: results which may occur. . M^any claim that small quantities of hair are taken into the stomach, and this is, finally matted into a firm ball, which may clog . in the stomach or bowels of the calf, resulting in death. The reason .for this .habit, of sucking may . in some measure suggest av re medy. When we feed calves with milk" from the -.pail,- they .drink so rapidly that they fail to relieve the mouth of the saliva which naturally mixes with the milk, while thej are suck ing. In order to relieve their mouths of tlie sccretion which organs of di gestion demand, they will seek some thing to suck which will rid their mouths of the saliva, which has been retained to a largo extent, and their favourite object is .some portion o...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FRIGHTENED HIM. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 24 April 1914

FRIGHTENED HIM. Ho was a sewing-machine agent of the most aggressive typo.' For twenty minutes the liuly ot the hoi;se had been awaiting an oppor tunity to say . she already possessed one. At last he paused. Only long enough, however, to thrust a card into the lady's hand. The bit of pasteboard was certainly a novelty. "My name is Sellum," it read, "of the firm of Blang and Company,, sew ing-machine manufacturers, and I in tend to prove to you that it is mad ness to defer purchasing one of our unequalled machines." -After a long description ol the machine carac the following: "You may plead that you are unable to work a machine. I will remove that objection in fifteen min | utes, or in three lessons. Will call inext Wednesday." When the agent called again a six foot man opened the door and bland ly remarked :— "You're the sewing-machine man, I suppose "Yes ; I called last week, and"—— "Yes, I know," interrupted tlic big man. "You don't know me, I sup pose ? My name's Bury, of Bury a...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXV. THE GARDEN ON THE CLIFF. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 24 April 1914

CHAPTER XXV. TI-IE GARDEN '.'ON'.THE CLIFF. It was 110 safe or:i!casy , task on which Hick now adventured forth, and he realised this as vlie passed from the housc- into the moonlit street and turned in the opposite , direction to that taken by Captain Volborth for his purpose was nothing less than to try to steal an interview with Mary Ferris—to enter tly; dangerous pre cincts forbidden to him by Jason Gore. I-Ic liud made the resolve long, be fore, but had failed to find tho op portunity, since tile. Russian was with him every evening through thoso hours that were most suitable for the' attempt. And heretofore lie had been merely actuated by a fierce desire to see the girl, with no definite idea of what he would say if he was success ful while to-night, after the conver sation with Volborth, he felt that urgent reasons "existed, for' seeking the interview, and that he had tid ings of hope and cheer to communi cate. • : ;Nor •'wsis>Mary,i"thc sole object of his thoughts. Another...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XXIV. A VISITOR AT THE ADMIRALTY. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 24 April 1914

CHAPTER XXIV. A VISITOR AT THE ADMIRALTY. About two weeks prior to Dick's arrival on the island, and while the King of Troy was still off the South American coast. Lieutenant Geoflrey Granville stood one morning at the window of his hotel, looking inootlily down on the bustling Strand. He liad long since learned the worst, for the Malta had remained in New York un til the return there of the two Ameri can men-of-war — the' crippled one bringing the crew aud passengers of the Juno—filled the papers with sen sational and thrilling news.. There had been columns and columns des cribing, it all—the loss of the mail steamer Tropic, 'the rescue of some of licr passengers by the Juno, the Tjoarding of the latter by Gore and liis ruffiaus, and the sinking of the ship after Luke Radford had been murdered and Mary Ferris abducted ; then the lucky falling in of the Juno's "boats with the man-of-war, and the subsequent chase and dreadful fight that ended with the destruction of the yacht and the...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BURIED CITIES. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 24 April 1914

THE BURIED CITIES. 4 (Jly REV. E. V. WADDY.) Aii Australian vi«iling Ceylon cannot but be impressed hy <-''0 an" iirjin'ty and historical romance of much that he comes across there. In his own country -lie can point to no monument dating buck more than a century, whilst in Ceylon the age of everything is counted by the thousand years instead of the hundred. One explanation of the giant footprint on Adam's Veak takes hiin back to the very beginning of the World's history, and If he is sceptical about accepting \this, he is on surer ground when he visits Galle, where for thousands of years the merchants of the world have come to tra.de, and if lo-dav the harbour of Galle is descried for that of Colombo, it is practically certain that Galle is the site of the ancient Tarshish, from which Solomon drew ninny of his treasures. If something more recent is wanted, Galle again provides it, for the old Dutch fort still stands as it was built three centuries ago, and its walls, in s...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
(All Rights Reserved.) THE Secret Island. A Story of a Strange and Exciting Adventure. PART 9. CHAPTER XXIII. THE TWO TOWNS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 24 April 1914

(AH Rigirts Reserved.) THE . Secret Island. ft Story of a Strange and j Exciting Adventure. i By W. Murray Graydcm, Author of "Matthew Quia," "The Curse of the Cardews," etc., etc. PART 9. CHAPTER XXIII. THE TWO TOWNS. During the afternoon there was great excitement and noise in the town, and from a front window Dick watched the motley groups of people who passed up and down the street. After dinner Jason Gore came in, and held a private conversation with Dick. "Although our laws forbid it," he began, "I am going to give you two more months of grace. At the end of that time you must take the oath of allegiance, or suffer the conse jquences ot refusal. Meanwhile you will have plenty of freedom, and can ob serve for yourself the sort of life we -■?*" lead Iierc." Dick was too prudent to reply to this ultimatum. It would be bad policy, he reflected, to ruffle the pir ate at such a time, "Will; I be permitted to sec Miss Ferris ?," he asked. "Not until the two months have expired," was ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Roosevelt Story. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 24 April 1914

I Roosevelt Story. | < I Many good .stories nre told in Mr. Roosevelt's autobiography published recently. Mr. Iloosevolt wished io appoint ail ex-Houglirider marshal of ■ aj Ifocky Iklountoln jjut' filrSt questioned him ns to his past. "Now, Ben," asked Roosevelt, "how did you lose that half of your ear ?" • To which, looking rather shy, Ben responded :— "Well, Colonel, it was'bit oil:" "How did it happen ?" "Weil, you.see, I wa:; sent to ar rest' a gentleman, and him and mc mixed it up and he bit off my ear." "What did you do 'to the gentle ma n, lien V" And Hon, looking more coy than ever, responded ; "Well, Colonel, we broke about even."

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Slippery Mystery. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 24 April 1914

A Slippery Mystery. .• —♦ After years of study scientists are still in ignorance as to the -origin of the'eel, which is in niany ways an exceedingly puzzling creature. I*"or instance, he will reside for years in the dark depths of the ocean, and then suddenly adjourn to the surface for a couple of years. He is a born wanderer, and appa rently quite indilTerent to changes of climate; for lie will warm him self in the Gulf Stream for a time, and then, all of a sudden, make tracks for cold - water. vAfler that he may decide to try fresh water, and proceed to take -up - his abode in the river, travelling sometimes 3,000 miles to do so ! Neither does the eel mind very much whether he is in the water or not, for he will make his way over damp grass, even when quite young, to a pond or lake miles. 11 way. Here lie may stny for years, but event ually he will pro bably return ovciaml to the near est river, ;i i nt from thence <-.co more to the sea. Miss (.Jrace Tyson, an American ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SMART BOY. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 24 April 1914

SMART BOY. II wns (lie lesson, and (he teacher was i-x.iluioin^ the dif ference between a common and ab stract noun. "An example of a common noun is dojr." she said, "for you can see it, while \ oil raimot sec anything that is an abstract 'loiin. For instance. have any of you seen abundance ?" There was silence for about u mi nute. Then a little hoy tfot tip and said— "Please, ma'am, I have never seen a bun dunce, but J hnvo seen n cake walk."

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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