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Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Our Weekly Golf Hint [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Our Weekly Golf Hint IT is weil to remember that the most important and useful club in your bag is the mashie, and no op- portunity should be lost in practis- ing with this club. Take a few balls and com- mence with short chips from about 20 yards from the flag. Concentration   is absolutely es- sential. The re- ward for mastering this stroke-saving shot will be worth the mental effort. Gradually increase the distance by easy stages up to 80 yards, and then drop balls at frequent intervals in the reverse order. There are many ways of playing the mashie, and the ap- proach to no two greens is alike; some are downhill, others are on the slant, ground in cases very hard, and in others very soft and spongy. The best shot for each of these approaches should be practised until when any green is approached the particular type of stroke necessary should au- tomatically come to your mind.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Personalities In GOLF Noted Visitor [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Personalities     In GOLF   Noted Visitor AUSTRALIA'S champion woman golfer, Miss Susie Tolhurst, was in Syd- ney last week, and enjoyed a round with Miss Nixon at N.S.W. Club, La Perouse, in the open foursomes. This was Miss Tolhurst's first visit to the greatly-im- proved New South Wales course. Silver Medal Winner THE winner of Roseville's L.G.U. silver medal, Mrs. C. C. Hilderbrandt, is a former club champion, and has been a popular and capable associate captain for the past two years. The winner of the bronze medal, Mrs. Ron Sharpe, is the most improved player in the club. Reduced Handicap CLUB champion of Cammeray in 1931, Mrs. Harry Clarke-Smith, with a splen- did score of 75 in the second qualifying round of the championship last week, reduced her handicap to 12, and is now eligible to play in the State champion- ship next month. Coming Star NOW fully recovered from her illness early in the season, Mrs. J. T. Cush, of Kogarah, is back o...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
COUNTRY CARNIVAL Will Test WOMEN GOLFERS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

COUNTRY CARNIVAL Will Test WOMEN GOLFERS By DOROTHY KEARNEY At N.S.W. Club, La Perouse, commencing on Monday next, the annual country week carnival will be held. THE country section of the N.S.W. Ladies' Union consists of 164 clubs, with approximately 5000 odd members. It is divided into nine separate district associations as follows: The Western (Miss M. Mackenzie, presi- dent), Blue Mountains (Mrs. Allerton, presi- dent), Central Northern (Mrs. A. A. Rankin, president), Northern Rivers (Mrs. R. D. Lang, president), Central Southern (Miss M. McLeish, president), North and North-West (Mrs. A. A. Cohen, president), Riverina (Mrs. Lethbridge, president), New England (Mrs. Ewing, presi- dent), and Central North Coast (Mrs. Chad- wick, president). CHIEF EVENT The principal event, the country championship, will be decided over 36 holes stroke. Miss Muriel Phillips, of Lithgow, the present champion, will de- fend her title. Miss Vedas Ebert, the tall, long-hitting left-hander from River- ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
HIGHLY COMMENDED [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

HIGHLY COMMENDED     Constance Russell, Mosman; Warren     Coombes, Crow's Nest; Beatrice Rush,     Gladesville; Victor Ralph Marott, Can-   terbury; Connie Caley, Wellington;   Louie Brown, Marrickville; Kenneth     Smith, North Sydney; Madeleine Sel-   den, Bexley; Nuri Mass, Ashfield; Jean     Fortescue, Marrickville; Marguerite   Wagner, Swansea; Clare Smithers,   Hurstville; Isabel McKay, Petersham;   Joyce Rogers, Croydon; Brian Kear-     ney, Northbridge; Dorothy Gray,   Brighton-le-sands; Joan Griffiths,   Mayfield; Charmian Shiress, Mosman;   Rene Stuart, Marrickville; Daphne,     Ronnie and Mavis Hill, Queanbeyan;   Anita Allen, Hornsby; Anne Perry,   &a...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
CRICKET TEAM PLANS COUNTRY TOUR [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

CRICKET TEAM PLANS COUNTRY TOUR WITH the idea of fostering women's cricket in country districts, and at the same time, partaking of a unique and interesting trip, members of the Kuring-Gai Women's Cricket Club are arranging for another tour of the coun- try in August. THESE trips are delightfully planned. A comfort coach and driver are hired, and with the top overladen with tents, mattresses, pots, pans, and   other useful things that go with camp- ing, the team of twelve or more     players leave for their destination. Matches are played at all the towns visited. Pitching tents, and cooking their own meals, the players live in an entirely different atmosphere to our International Cricket tourists, who look for the best accommodation and chefs. Nevertheless, the enthusiastic girls enjoy their cricket as never before. The untimely arrival of a bull on the field, or the fact that a ball has to be chased through a barb wire fence, does not in the ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
A Venetian EVENING In a strange comradeship the noble and the kitchen girl went gaily forth upon their great adventure.... [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

A Venetian EVENING In a strange comradeship the noble and the kitchen girl went gaily forth upon their great adventure . . . . THE Marchese Barbetta     had left his palace for       the last time. In front         of his doors the State   barge which had borne   his coffin rocked on       the slow tide of the     canal, which swelled           between the blue and             white striped posts                     showing his gorgeous           ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
BAD DANCERS may take HEART Geniuses Have Been Failures In The Ballroom [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

BAD DANCERS may take HEART Geniuses Have Been Failures In The Ballroom By CONNIE MARSHALL SOME men who cannot dance, or who dance badly, affect a contempt for dancing, and most women believe that their contempt is genuine—simply an aversion to a popular amusement. But this is not always so. Behind this dis- like for dancing is often keen envy for the man who can dance well. IT is not only the every-day young man who feels like this. There are many instances which show that an in- ability to dance has caused great dis- tress even to men of genius, and, in some cases, has had an ever-lasting in- fluence on their entire outlook. Take Balzac, for example. When he was quite young he wrote to his sister, Laure (the one person whom he con- fided in at that time), that he had "two immense and sole desires—to be famous and to be loved." To win love he took dancing les- sons! On his first night on the ball- room he slipped and fell to the ground. This naturally won the smiles of all the women...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

If the Recipe says MILK use TRUFOOD     H0¿ Rainbow Milk Jelly 1 pint mixed Trufood milk 2 ozs. Sugar 2 dessertspoons pow- dered gelatine Vanilla essence Stir milk, sugar and vanilla in bowl until dis- solved, then stir in the gelatine (dissolved in a little boiling water). Divide the mixture into three parts ; colour the first part with a little cochineal and pour into mould. Leave the second portion plain and pour into the mould when the first portion has quite set. Colour the last portion orange, yellow or brown with a little yokine, yokova, cocoa, or other suitable colouring, and pour it into the mould when the rest of the jelly has set. TRUFOOD is real country milk with only the water and portion of the butter fat removed. TRUFOOD enables you to make all your cooking twice as delicious and nourishing. Use Trufood powdered milk in every recipe you can and you'll have lighter cakes, nicer sauces and the most appetising desserts imaginable. TRUFOOD is a s...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Some OLD ENGLISH Recipes CURLERS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Some OLD ENGLISH Recipes CURLERS For your next party, or for the delec- tation of your family circle at afternoon tea or at supper, try these dainty bis- cuits. Ingredients: 4 ozs. Butter or |1 gill of Milk Margarine |(¼ pint) 4 ozs. Caster Sugar |½ teaspoonful pow- ½lb. Flour |dered nutmeg or 1 teaspoonful Bak- |cinnamon ing Powder |Frying fat 1 Egg |Pinch salt. Beat butter and sugar to a cream. Add egg and beat well in. Sieve baking powder, flour, salt and spice. Stir into butter mixture alter- nately with milk. Turn on to a floured board. Knead slightly. Roll out about ½ inch thick and stamp into rounds about the size of top of tumbler. Cut out small round from centre of each round. Make fat hot. When faint blue smoke arises, put in some of the curlers. Fry till pale golden brown and puffy. Lift out with perforated spoon. Drain on soft papers. Dredge with sugar. Fat must be hot, and do not fry too many at once. FARMER'S LOAF CAKE The little folk will appreciate a gener- ous slice...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

. . brings Healthful Cleanliness Old Dutch Cleanser is best for your home . . . because it cleans safely . . . use it on any surface on which water may be used. Old Dutch con- tains no harsh grit; it doesn't scratch. Old Dutch has no equal for cleaning porcelain and enamel, kitchen utensils, floors, ice chests, painted walls, woodwork—in fact it is your biggest help for all house-cleaning. Old Dutch is best for your hands, too . . . because it is free from caustic and acid . . . It doesn't roughen or redden the skin. More econ- omical than rough, wasteful sandsoaps. It is economy to use Old Dutch Cleanser . . . because it goes further and lasts longer. Keep a tin of Old Dutch in the kitchen and bathroom —save yourself time and steps. MADE IN AUSTRALIA SINCE 1915

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Let's Talk Of INTERESTING PEOPLE... [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Let's Talk 0f INTERESTING   PEOPLE . . . LADY GORDON —Dorothy Welding LADY GORDON, wife of Sir Alexander Gordon, who looks at you from this Dorothy Welding photograph, is small and dark and vivacious. She is intensely interested in the arts, and there is sel- dom an audience at any concert or play in which she is not included. Lady Gordon is one of Sydney's best organisers for charity, and her enthusi- asm for every cause for which she works is such that everybody she comes in con- tact with feels compelled to help her make it a success. Daughter Anne is well known in amateur dramatic circles. MISS G. B. FRENCH MISS FRENCH, although still in the early twenties, has the distinction of having had three of her scenarios produced. In conjunction with her brother-in-law, Mr. Miles Mander, she has worked on the floor of the studios of London. Long Island, and in Ger- many. Though an Australian. Miss French has spent most of her life abroad. Miss French is flat-hunting for her...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
AUSTRALIAN Gives LONDON It's New THRILL [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

AUSTRALIAN Gives LONDON it's New THRILL LONDON. WEATHER plays an extremely impor- tant part in the calculations of the promoters of this novel scheme; and, from statistics already available, they have worked out that, out of 120 days, they may reasonably expect 90 without rain, even in the English climate. As well, they will have a special "weather man" installed before and dur- ing every performance, in direct touch by telephone with the Air Ministry and the Greenwich Observatory. He will be able to warn them exactly of any ap- proaching rain squall—and the audience may then be drafted into a covered-in area opposite, for which another stage has been banked up in readiness. A complex system of canopies which may be rigged up at a moment's notice has also been devised. A carriage drive has been specially constructed for the convenience of visitors arriving in cars at this remote spot, situated right in the middle of the inner circle of Regent's Park. People who do not own cars and c...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
SO THEY SAY! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

SO THEY SAY! WOMEN decide the larger questions of life correctly, and quickly, not because they are lucky guessers, not because they are divinely inspired, not because they practise a magic inherited from savagery, but simply and solely because they have sense. —From H. L. Mencken's "In Defence of Women." Prize of 10/ to Miss Beth Haywood, 26 Norfolk Street, Paddington, N.S.W. THE BOY who "stood on the burning deck whence all but he had fled" was a moron.—Professor H. A. Overstreet, in an address before the Child Study Association of America. "I APPEAL to you to co-operate for the sake of the ultimate good of the whole world. It cannot be beyond the power of man so to use the vast re- sources of the world as to assure the material progress of civilisation."—His Majesty the King. "THE PRACTICE of white settlers in the tropics of bringing black boy ser- vants to Australia when on furlough is just snobbishness." —Mr. C. W. C. Marr, Minister for Territories. "THE ETHICAL behaviour of ma...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
RADIO Items That Are Wrongly PLACED [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

RADIO Items That Are Wrongly PLACED By SARABANDE ONE of the things that strike the observant critic of radio programmes is that a woman has no place in drawing some of them up. No woman would be so foolish as to forget that meal-times are times for music and not for talks. IN the average suburban home, father arrives home about six and tea comes on the table between six-fifteen and six- thirty. That takes about half an hour, and, while a little subdued music might help to fill m the gaps in family conversa- tion, it requires a good deal of concen- tration and an effort to silence the children to listen to anyone giving a fifteen minutes' talk. A woman would think of practical points like that, but a man seems to be concerned with "fit- ting everything in," irrespective of whether the time is suitable or not. It is too often forgotten that the wire- less is a family instrument, and because one person in a family happens to want to hear a particular talk, it doesn't fol- low that the ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
MUSIC FAREWELL CONCERT [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

FAREWELL CONCERT ALTHOUGH there was a gap in her   studies due to a serious accident, in which she sustained fractures of both wrists and multiple fractures of both hands, a Sydney surgeon performed a remarkable bone setting feat ; and Miss Daphne Har- pur, who graduated at Sydney Conser- vatorium two and a half years ago, will give a pianoforte recital at the Con- servatorium on   Thursday, June 29. This will be in the nature of a farewell, for Miss Harpur is going abroad as a result |Daphne Harpur of a conversation she had with M. Moi- seiwitsch in Sydney last year. Miss Har- pur was committee member as well as a performer during Music Week last year, giving demonstrations at several public schools, and at St. Anthony's School, Clovelly, as well as playing in the Newcastle Town Hall. MR. JOHN BROWNLEE will not give   his recitals of July at the Town   Hall. For the first time, except for minor functions, the Presbyterian Assembly...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
April Tricks [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

April Tricks WHEN April one day was asked   whether   She could make reliable weather,   She laughed till she cried, And said: "Bless you, I've tried,     But the things will get mixed up to- gether."

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
POiNTS OF ViEW Seeking a Blackguard [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Seeking a Blackguard SOMEWHERE a blackguard is at large! But the law is on his track.   No woman can fail to note the significance of the District Coroner's remarks in the Mus- wellbrook trial. He said that Irene Marden, the young Glen Innes girl, who is accused of throwing her baby from a train, had gone through a terrible ordeal, and that a man who would get a girl into trouble and desert her was a blackguard. Who the blackguard is, the law will find out. Fifty years ago it probably would not have bothered. In those days it was the women who always paid. * * * Why Not Our Own IN the first edition of your splendid new Weekly a writer deplored the fact that she was forced to buy tinned oysters which were not produced in Australia. No doubt many people are still unaware of the new industry that is rapidly corning to the fore at Port Stephens. Some few months ago an enterprising young Australian leased a large factory right on the shores of Port Stephens and began to tin ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The UNIVERSITY WOMAN as a JOB-GETTER Careers For Women [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

The UNIVERSITY WOMAN as a JOB-GETTER This article upon what the University   offers women in the way of careers is continued from last week. This is the third of our Special Commissioner's articles upon careers for women. Careers For Women MISS IDA LEESON, B.A., is one brilliant University woman who has succeeded; she is now chief librarian of the Mitchell Library.   But very few such posi- tions ever offer themselves. THE University year is only about 30 weeks long, divided into three terms. The first term opens about the middle of March, and the third term ends when examinations commence about mid-November. Examinations are nearly always over by the first or second week in December. Students have the rest of the year free. People (not only men), undertaking studies at the University should realise (a great many never do), that there are two great barriers between Univer- sity graduates and employment: (1) The prejudice and resentment (sometimes justified)...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
HUNDREDS IN SEARCH FOR BEAUTY QUEST Magnificent Prizes Offered [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

HUNDREDS IN SEARCH FOR BEAUTY QUEST   Magnificent Prizes Offered BUSTER CRABBE won the Paramount contin- ent-wide contest for "A Lion Man" to star in the picture, "King of the Jungle." Already hundreds of eager entrants are sending in their photographs for The Search For Beauty contest in which The Australian Women's Weekly and Paramount are co- operating in a quest for Australia's most perfect man and woman. This contest gives young Australian men and women a really wonderful opportunity of winning what everyone must at some time have yearned for—a screen career. But this is not all. The contest winners are offered: 1. A part in the Paramount picture, "The Search For Beauty," at a salary of fifty dollars per week for a minimum of five weeks. 2. Transportation to and from Hollywood. 3. Hotel accommodation during their stay in Hollywood. 4. Chance to compete for special bonus of 2000 dollars, and a wonderful chance of a screen career. 5. Wardrobe of clothes to each value...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LOWER'S IDEA of the Perfect FROCK [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

LOWER'S IDEA of the Perfect FROCK By L. W. LOWER, Australia's foremost humorist. NOW, although married, I am not like that. Nothing pleases me better than to design little things for my wife and her lady friends, and I am never happy unless I am potter- ing about doing a bit of rucking or box-pleating. As a matter of fact, pleating boxes is one of the best things I do, al- though I have done a fair amount of accordeon pleating for those musically inclined. This season's designs are much above anything I have done before. I should say that they are approxi- mately eight inches above. The waist, to be fashionable, must be worn under the armpits. An unique and exclusive model   which I have just finished sags slight- ly at the back, and is a bit short in the front. The even hem-line is ob- tained by the wear- er walking in a slightly crouched position, as though just about to jump. The costume is in a pale cream velvet organdie with black silk goudet (pro- nounced "Good da...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
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