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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE SORROWS OF A SAILOR. TIRED OF LIFE AT THIRTY-TWO. A BROTHER IN AUSTRALIA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THE SORROWS OF A SAILOR. TIRED OF LIFE AT THIRTY-TWO. A BROTHER IN AUSTRALIA.   Before Mr. Chapman, at Southwark, London,   recently, Herbert Arthur Bray (32), seaman, was   charged with attempting to commit suicide. The   prisoner, who was brought from Guy's Hospital,   came into court on crutches, both legs having been amputated below the knees.   An inspector on the L.B. and S.C. railway sta-   tion, Peckham Rye, said that at 2.30 p.m. on   September 3, the prisoner was on one of the plat-   forms, and asked him the destination of an ap-   proaching train. "When the train was only 20   yards away, the prisoner jumped in front of it.   The train went over him; both his feet were   cut off, and his head was injured.   Constable 25, M. R., handed to Mr. Chapman a   letter (written in red ink...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NEW FIRE ESCAPE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A NEW FIRE ESCAPE.     The Boyd patent fire escape was recently given a successful public trial in Auckland (N.Z.). The canvas in the shute was tested up to a weight-carrying capacity of 12cwt. The shute is of a zig-zag shape, and absolutely fire-proof. Several men and boys came down the shute successfully. The corkscrew-like tube prevents the descent being made too rapidly, but the person in it may travel as quickly as he desires. A local syndicate have taken the invention in hand, and applied for patents throughout the world. It is stated that the New Zealand and Australian rights will be reserved. The holder of the rights goes home shortly to make ar- rangements. On a dining car of the New York Central recently, 318 dinners were served without re- stocking the car.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STEERING TORPEDOES. WITHOUT WIRES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

STEERING TORPEDOES.       WITHOUT WIRES.   In last week's "World's News,"' under the   heading "The Very Latest," some interesting   particulars were given of experiments in steer-   ing torpedoes without wires. The following is   also in the same direction, and equally impor-   tant:—   Experiments with the Orling-Armstrong sys-   tem for the transmission of power without wires   have been witnessed at Hughenden by the naval   attaches of Germany, Austria, and the United   States.   These gentlemen are interested in the torpedo   steered by means of invisible radiation to which   the name of "Actinaut" has been given, and they   attended the demonstration at their own re-   quest. The movements of the actinaut's rudder   were ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A WEEK IN A COFFIN. THE VERY LATEST SENSATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A WEEK IN A COFFIN.   THE VERY LATEST SENSATION.   There are many curious ways of gaining a live- lihood (says the "Daily Chronicle"), and so Georges Papuss must be given the credit of in- venting one in which it is not very likely there will be much competition. Papuss is a South American, of French origin, and is 34 years of age. His scheme consists in burying himself for a week in a coffin supplied with air and a certain amount of warmth, but with nothing else. He claims to do this by what he calls "auto-sugges- tion," which apparently enables him to persuade himself that things are not what they seem, and that hunger and thirst are non-existent. It cannot be said that the new spectacle which Mr. Ritchie and Mr. Wilkinson have supplied to their patrons at the London Royal Aquarium is of a very elevating or indeed entertaining char- acter. Still no doubt those with a love of the bizarre and the morbid will go and see what cer- tainly has never yet been se...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THEY SCORN FASHION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

THEY SCORN FASHION.   The women of Venice care nothing about stylish clothes, and Dame Fashion's rule is no law for them. Their dress is always dark, plainly made, neither short nor long. The universal open-air garment for all ages and all sizes is the black shawl with a deep silken fringe, folded with a short point above and a low point below. Hats are unknown. The heelless slipper of the East is universally worn. In matters of dress the women of Venice are independent, wearing purely local clothes; but with feminine inconsis- tency they follow the fashion of the outside world in the arrangement of the hair, and coiffures change from year to year, according to the modes in vogue in London and Paris. And this makes one little corner of the world more interesting.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TWO LOVE TRAGEDIES. SWEETHEART MURDERED NEAR SALOP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

TWO LOVE TRAGEDIES. SWEETHEART MURDERED NEAR SALOP.   Love tragedies have of late been occurring in England with startling frequency. Another such tragedy took place in the vil- lage of Westbury, Salop, the other morning, when a barmaid named Eliza Bowen was alleged to have been murdered by her sweetheart, Richard Wigley, of Shrewsbury. Wigley walked from Shrewsbury to Westbury, a distance of nine miles, in the morning, and on arriving at the hotel called for a glass of ale. Just as Miss Bowen turned away to get the beer the young man followed her threateningly. Miss Bowen called to the servant to take the jug from her, but seeing a knife, and, being fright- ened, the girl ran out and called for assistance. Meanwhile the young man, it is alleged, almost severed Miss Bowen's head from the body. He then sat down, and quietly scribbled a note to deceased's sister, which ran: "Dear Kate,—I have killed your sister. I did it for love." The girl was discovered lying in a pool ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BOY'S LETTER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A BOY'S LETTER. A small boy, says the "Week End," was seen   by his father to go one evening mysteriously   into the garden, and bury a piece of paper as   deeply as he could. When he had gone to bed,   the father dug the paper up, and read the fol-   lowing:—"Dear Devil,—Please come and take   away Nurse Jane. Your loving Tommy."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A COLD, WET NOSE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A COLD, WET NOSE.         It was at the time when Shem, Ham, and   Japhet were rounding up a very mixed mob of   beasts, etc., while Noah was busy cutting out a   pair of each, assisted by his dog.     Dogs' noses stood at the same temperature as   the rest of their features at that time, and Noah's   assistant's nose was very hot with his exertions.   By dint of a great deal of shouting, barking,   and "heeling," all the couples were got on board   at last, and every available inch of space was   occupied in the animals' quarters, so that when   the dog—("and 'Bingo' was his name, O!")—came   panting aboard the Ark, Noah found that his   faithful friend had been—as is usual with faith-   ful friends—overlooked in the planning of the &a...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A WOMAN POLICE SERGEANT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A WOMAN POLICE SERGEANT. The only woman in the world holding the office of police sergeant is Mrs. Mary E. Owens, of Chicago. She wears sergeant's badge No. 97, reports regularly to Chief Colleran, of the detec- tives, and is on the regular pay-roll. Sergeant Owens has served under six Mayors, having begun her career in 1889, when she was forced by the death of her husband to support herself and four children. She now acts as a police official for the Board of Education, and is well known among sweating shops, factories, and department stores, where it is her duty to hunt up violations of the compulsory education and child labor laws.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SUNDAY TRAMS IN EDINBURGH. "UNCO' GUTD" SHOCKED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

SUNDAY TRAMS IN EDINBURGH. "UNCO' GUID" SHOCKED. About a month ago the cable stated that Sun- day trams were being run in Edinburgh, and that the people of that city were greatly shocked. Papers by the mail which arrived last Tuesday show that the "unco' guid" of the city are up in arms over the Sunday tram question, and a bitter fight has begun with the corporation and the Sabbatarians on the one side and the populace and the tramway company on the other. First blood has been drawn by the tramway company, who, taking the enemy by surprise, in- stituted a service of Sunday cars on December 1 for the first time in the history of the Sabbath- observing city. For some time past there has been consider- able friction between the company, who are merely the lessees of the line, and the corpora- tion in regard to certain points connected with the lease. When the system was converted into one of cable haulage the lessees contracted to pay 7 per cent. on the capital outlay, amounting to ove...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHY RIGHT-HANDED? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

WHY RIGHT-HANDED? Why are we right-handed? Because, one may reply, right-handedness is a matter of habit and custom. But, then, some people are left- handed, so that habit and custom have had no effect in their case. A physiologist thus solved the problem:— "In the average human being," he said, "the left hemisphere of the brain is better supplied with blood than the right. And, as the left side of the brain governs the right side of the body (and vice versa), the superiority of the right hand over the left is thus explained. "In a few exceptional instances the blood supply is better on the right than on the left of the brain, and in these cases the subjects are left-handed. "It is a curious fact in this connection that left-handed people as a rule sleep on the left side, being led unconsciously to adopt this atti- tude in order to relieve the right half of their brain, which is under a higher blood-pressure than the left. For the majority—the right handed people—the proper position...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ILL-DRESSED PEERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

ILL-DRESSED PEERS.   The lords as a class dress in a manner which scarcely does justice to themselves or their tailors. We remember attending a House of Lords Commission. With the exception of the chairman, Lord Dunraven, and one or two of the younger lords, they were about the worst-dressed body of public men we ever saw assembled to- gether. —"Tailor and Cutter."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Amateur Professionals in Cricket. MR. MACLAREN'S POSITION. AS CAPTAIN OF HAMPSHIRE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

Amateur Professionals in Cricket. MR. MACLAREN'S POSITION. —*— AS CAPTAIN OF HAMPSHIRE. At the annual meeting of the Hampshire   County Cricket Club at Southampton a month   ago, the president, Mr. Moberley, drew attention   to a matter which appears to us ("St. James' Gazette") to concern the welfare of the great   national game much more gravely than the suc-   cess or failure of Mr. MacLaren's team to defeat   their opponents in Australia. He mentioned the   fact, which has been known to cricketers for some time past, that Mr. MacLaren, instead of captain-   ing, as heretofore, the Lancashire County Eleven,   with which he has played ever since he left school, will next year give his services to Hamp-   shire.       We say "give" his services, because the old   Harrovian will play in the county eleven...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANAEMIA AND THE MOUNTAIN AIR THEORY. RESULT OF THE PARIS BALLOON EXPERIMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

ANAEMIA AND THE MOUNTAIN AIR THEORY. RESULT OF THE PARIS BALLOON   EXPERIMENTS. Whether the number of the red corpuscles of the blood is increased by an ascent into the higher regions of the atmosphere, as has been suggested, or whether the undoubtedly appa- rent increase is an appearance only, was one of   the questions which Parisian savants hoped to solve after the recent aerial investigations. The importance of the question, of course, centres round the fact that it has been believed that a residence in mountain air was one of the   most efficacious remedies for anaemia or tuber- culosis. "The first impression of the medical aeronauts was," if the Paris correspondent of the "Daily Mail" is correctly informed, "in accordance with the accepted theory that the blood was en- riched in proportion to the height attained; but now that the doctors have had time to submit the specimens of blood taken during their aerial trip to the searching light o...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MURDEROUS ASSAULT. IN A GLASGOW HOTEL. WHAT WERE THE EMPTY TRUNKS FOR? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

MURDEROUS ASSAULT. IN A GLASGOW HOTEL.   WHAT WERE THE EMPTY TRUNKS FOR? An extraordinary outrage took place recently at St. Enoch Station Hotel, Glasgow. A man who was staying in the house decoyed another man to his bedroom, and, after seriously assault- ing him, endeavored to rob him of a large sum of money. He failed in the attempt; and when he found that his scheme was frustrated, jump-   ed through a window, and sustained injuries   which necessitated his removal to the Royal   Infirmary. It appears that a Mr. Taylor, having answered   an advertisement for a cashier, was informed   that the vacant situation was in a London bank,   and that, as large sums of money were dealt   with, it would be necessary that he should     lodge a sum of £235 as security for his integri-   ty. An appointment was made at St. Enoch's   Hotel, a...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SLY MOVE BY RUSSIA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

SLY MOVE BY RUSSIA.     A sensational report has reached Vienna from the Russian capital via Lemberg to the effect that a Note will be addressed by Russia to the Powers proposing an alteration or modification of the treaty closing the Dardanelles to the war- ships of all nations. "The Russian Government, it is reported, con- siders the present time most suitable for reviv- ing this question, which has hitherto proved a dangerous cause of dissension among the Powers.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LEGLESS HUMANITY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

          LEGLESS HUMANITY.   According to a Philadelphia paper, an English   professor foresees a legless humanity. He can   see no reason for thinking that the present ten-   dency of people to use artificial means of pro-   gression will not continue, and even increase.   The whole theory of evolution rests on the prin- ciple that the persistent disuse of members will end in their loss; just as the blindness of the fishes in the subterranean river in Mammoth Cave has followed the habit of living in darkness.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
One of England's Historic Piles. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

One of England's Historic Piles. BATTLE ABBEY The notification that Battle Abbey, whose his- toric associations date back to the time of Wil- liam the Conqueror, was to be sold at public auction brought together so large a gathering that the mart in Tokenhouse-yard, London, was not equal to the demands upon it, and an adjourn- ment was made to the Great Hall of Winchester House, which itself was crowded in every part. The property offered comprised not only the   historic abbey, founded in 1067 by William the   Conqueror, on the site of the battle of Hastings,   to commemorate his victory over King Harold,   but the adjoining domain, including dower house,   farms and woodlands, with a total acreage of 6118,   and a rent roll of about £5500. The magnificent   buildings, which have been placed on the market   in consequence of the death of the Duchess of   Cleveland, m...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PUT IN HIS TIME. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

PUT IN HIS TIME.   Master (to journeyman joiner): "Do you call yourself a workman, and turn out a job like that? Have you ever served any time at the trade?" Man: "Aye, I served a proper apprenticeship long afore you ever started in business." Master: "Well, what have you been it since?"   Man: "Well, I've been out on strike pretty well   ever since."        

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MICROBE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 11 January 1902

A MICROBE.   Teacher: Tommy, in the sentence, "A microbe   is a minute living organism," parse "microbe."   Tommy Tucker: "Microbe" is a common noun,   possessive case—   Teacher: Possessive case?   Tommy: Yes'm. First person, microbe;     second person, your crobe; third person, his—   Teacher: Thomas, go and take your seat.   "Chicago Tribune."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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