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Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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with me the Pilot of the vessel. Hi [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

with me the Pilot of the vessel. Hi was a Pennsylvanian. Some little difficulty was at first experienced in finding the entrance to the creek, which you will remember is very narrow, but having tound it, we pulled up this crooked channel —within pistol shot of either shore—till we discovered the schooner.. She was close to the shore , in charge of a sentry, who fled at our approach and alarmed the camp. She had a new suit of sails, and all the furniture complete, which was collected together in the cabin and fired, producing a beautiful conflagration, but, unfortunately, revealing our position to the enemy, who commenced a rapid fire from both banks of that narrow and tortuous stream, until we were beyond their range. Our crews returned a random tire from the boats and two steamers, gave cheers and pulled for their vessels. The li ght from the burning schooner, guiding them on their way. Her destruction was complete, and although the clothes ofthe men and the boats were perfor...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Federal Blockading Fleet Attaoked-Ee- [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

Federal Blockading Fleet Attaoked-Ee- ported Sucoess of the Confederates—The Preble Eeported Sunk and the Fleet Grounded. -B ALTIMORE, October 15.—The Norfolk Examiner of Monday , received by flaw of truce, contains a dispatch from New Orleans, dated the 12th , stating that a naval engagement had taken place at the head ofthe passes on the ni ght ofthe 11th, lasting one hour and afterwards renewed. It also contained the following dispatch : FORT JACKSON , October 12.—Last night I attacked the blockaders with my little fleet. I succeeded , after a very short struggle, in driving them all around on the southeast pass bar except the Preble. Which 1 sunk. I captured a prize from them, and after they were fast in the sand I peppered them well. There were no casualties on our side. It was a complete success. [Signed] HOLLINS. NKW ORLEANS, October 13.—The force of the Federal fleet was forty guns and nearly one thousand men. while the little Confederate mosquito fleet, was sixteen ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
life trf %t f ftg. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

life trf %t f ftg. Further About the Fight t» Jit. Hattetas A correspondent of the2j[. Y. *Poat," on board the U. S. steamer Monttcetto, writes as fallows of the late engagement «t Hatteras: On the evening of the 4th of October intelligence of the retreat of some ©f dur troop* was received here , —the Indiana regiment , —and that they were surrounded by three thousan d six hundred rebels. Of course, the Monticello was off at once. She would have burst tier boiler to have lain still when there was any prospect of a fig ht.— We ran up to JElatteras Lig ht and at daylig ht we found the Indiana regiment B-d retreated tothe light-bouse before a force of nearly four thousand rebels. We ran around Ilatteras Point close into the inner shoal and stood up the beech to the north, looking for the rebels. At 1:80 p. m. we found .them retreating up the beech to where their steamers lay, they having discovered our approach.— There was a regiment of Georgia troops and about eight hundred un...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

The Providence (B. I.) Press says: —One of those terrible accidents which teach but too vainly the inexcusable folly of sporting with deadly weapons, occured on Fast Day afternoon. The victim was Miss Henrietta Pease, an estimable young lady of Edgartown. Mass., in her 17th year. She was visiting the house of Mr. Benjamin Tilley, on Hig h street, and was standing at the window, when his son, a lad of 15, who was in the street playing with a gun, pointed it at her after placing a cap upon it to startle her by the explosion. On his pulling the trigger, the charge which was in the gun unknown to the lad, went through the g lass and into the Joung lady's head, instantly killing er. It seems that an elder brother who is now an officer in the army, formerly used the gun, and left it loaded with the exception of a cap, and the result is truly harrowing, plunging the two families into life-long g rief J Miss Pease was an only daughter, and previous misfortunes render this one peculiarly t...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Shocking 0lity in Bristol. E. I. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

Shocking 0_ni_lity in Bristol. E. I.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Important Balloon Eeconnoisance. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

Important Balloon Eeconnoisance. The balloon department in the army serfice on the Potomac is becoming one of considerable importance. Iia Mountain, the boldest of our serohauts, has just furnished valuable information to the government and General McClellan by his late daring flight. On Friday last, it may be remembered a balloon was seen passing over Washington, and it was ^noug ht by many to have started from the rebel camp on an aerial reieonnoisance; but as it subsequently descended in Maryland, it proved to "be the air ship of La Mountain, which had ascended from the Union camp ©f the Potomac. It appears that when La Mountain rose to a certain distance he cut the rope which con nected his balloon with the earth regardless of the danger, and sored up to an elevation of a mile and a half, and got directly over the rebel lines. Here he was enabled to make a perfect observation of their position and all their movements, the results of which he has comunicated to headquarte...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Advanoe of the Eebek. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

Advanoe of the Eebek. WASHINGTON, Oct. 12.—During the day the rebels advanced in large I forces in the direction of Prospect' Hill, driving in our pickets to that point. The result was that the Divi - jrion of General McCall was soon formed into line of battle, with orders to advance. It was supported by cavalry and artillery. Several snots were fired by the rebel batteries, but being out of range, no injury was sustained by Our troops. The Divisions of Gens. Smith, Porter and McDowell were also soon prepared for any apprehended emergency, but nothing farther, in addition to what is already stated, occurred to induee an adverse hostile toovement.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Latest from Jefferson City. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

Latest from Jefferson City. JEFFERSON C ITY , October 10.— Lieutenant Colonel E. B. Brown, of ; the 7th Missouri regiment, Provost. Marshall at Tipton, shot a private of the 6th Missouri this morning. The Colonel ordered him to lay down some boards he was tearing from a fence, and upou refusing, shot and killed him instantly. The affair created intense exctitement. The 2d and 6th Missouri regiments rushed to arms, demanding that Brown be delivered up to them. A park of artillery was drawn up in front of the Provost Marshall's office, and Brown was threatening to shoot the 1 mutineers when the train left. A scout hM jost arrived here from Springfield, and reports at headquarters that there were only one thousand rebels at that place. He also learned that Ben McColloch was at t Camp Jackson, with only one bun- tired -and fifty men, waiting reinforcements from Arkansas. A large number of licCulloch's force, who were with him at Wilson's Creek, Were with Price at Lexington, an...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Battle is New Mexico. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

Battle is New Mexico. ST. LOUIS, October 12.—The correspondence of the St. Louis "Re- i publican," from Santa Fe, New Mexico, September 22d, states that New Mexico is still free from invasion by Texans. On the 13th instant, at Fort Fountleray, forty Navejous made an attack on that post and were repulsed , with a loss of twenty killed and forty-four wounded and some taken prisoners. The troops in the fort had bat one man wounded. * The Govenpr's call for the enrollmentof all _oal«i b#tw«en theagesof eighteen and forty-five, does not seem! to elicit much attention from the \ people. I have yet to hear of the; first man complying with the re- \ quirements of the call. j Col. St. Vrain has resigned, and it J is understood that Kit Carson will! succeed him in command. . I !

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
New Eoad to the Pacific. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

New Eoad to the Pacific. A dispatch from Atchison, Kansas, Sept 27, says:—Major Bridger, guide to the surveying party through the mountains, arrived here last ni ght, and reports that the route from Denver West to Salt Lake is a perfectl y feasible one, and will shorten the distance from 200 to 250 miles and also the route from this city to Denver can be shortened 130 miles and greatly improved, changing the road down to the north bank ofthe Republican Forks. As Atchison is now the eastern terminus of the overland mail, and not St. Joseph, as formerly, all letters intended to go by Pony Express should be sent here. The coaches arrive and depart regularly.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Affaus on the Kanawha. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

Affaus on the Kanawha. Intelligence from Virginia by way of the South, as well as from our own army, shows that Gen. Lee has made a junction with Floyd, and both are advancing on the forces of Generals Rosecranzs and Cox. A special dispatch from Lynchburg, dated September 25th, to the K.noxville "Daily Register," has the following on this subject: Intelligence of a highly important movement in Western Virginia has been received. The reports already given, stating that Gen. Lee is about to make a junction with General Floyd, are fully confirmed. Re-inforcements to the extent of sixty-four companies have been sent forward to join Gen. Floyd's Brigade, and a considerable portion of his command has been ordered to Lewisburg. A dispatch from Darnestown, Maryland, states that the rebel forces have disappeared from that vicinity, and conjectures that they have joined Floyd. In that case it seems most probable that the forces of Lee would remain at Greenbrier river to keep Reynolds em...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
California News. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

California News. A new directory of San Francisco, under the supervision of parties regarded as undoubted authority in local and statistical matters, carefully canvasses the basis for estimating the present population of the city at 83,223, composed of 40,000 white males, 37,000 white females, 3,000 Chinese, and 2.000 colored. Considering that the city polled 11,125 votes at the recent election, the estimate ofthe directory appears not too high. The same authority states that 1,013 wooden buildings were erected in San Francisco divring the year ending with August, being oneeight of all the buildings the city contains. It is the general remark from ascertained facts that San Francisco was never so prosperous as at present. Gold discoveries have been made in a tributary of Salmon river, and a large party had left the South Fork for the mines.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Latest from Fortress Monroe, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

Latest from Fortress Monroe, PORTRESS MONROE. October 11.— The S. R. Spaulding returned from Fortress Monroe this morning, bringing further details of the recent engagement, which differs in but few respects from the accounts already telegraphed. The Indiana regiment lost their tents, provisions, and many of their knapsacks. Col. Brown states his loss at about fifty; none were killed by the fire of the rebels. The inhabitants along the beach came in with the regiment. The loss ofthe rebels has been overstated, but it was undoutedlj' large. Brigadier General Williams Will passage for Hatteras in the steamer S. R. Spaulding to morrow.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Decision on Prizes Taken. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

Decision on Prizes Taken. In the U. S. District Court, Judge Betts has rendered his decision in the eases of the prize barks Hiawatha. Pioneer and nine other vessels, seized by the blockading squadron.— This decision disposes of the great questions of law upon which all cases in the Prize Courts must depend, and hereafter these cases will be settled with summary celerity. All vessels and cargoes condemned will be sold at auction, the proceeds of which will be reported to the Prize Commissioners. The council for the captors will then hand in the name of the vessel that made the capture, and the name of each of her crew.— The Commissioners will next make final report ot the proceeds, after which the Court will enter a decree distributing the money among the captors. By the above decision, eleven vessels have been condemned, which, with the confiscated cargoes, will yield nearly a quarter of a million of dollars.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
No Immediate Fight in Prospect. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

No Immediate Fight in Prospect. The excitement washigh on Ihursday, telegraphs Col. Forney, under the impression that General McClellan was about to commence an extensive engagement with the rebels. It was increased during the evening by rumors brought in that a battle was in progress. All this, however, was without any foundation in truth. It is not part of General MeClellan's plan to inaugurate a general engagement. He will advance steadily upon the enemy, as he has been doing since the afternoon of Saturday. September 28, and will so arrange his forces as to be able to hold and defend each foot of territory recovered from the enemy. Gen. McClellan has given himself jew hours for rest during the last ten days. He returns to his headquarters, in the city, at ten o'clock at night. Several hours are then devoted to the telegraph correspondence with the army, to instructions to his staff oi.'i;ers , and to correspondence. He then snatches a few hours sleep, but is again in the s...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Wilson's Zouaves Attacked. ' [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

Wilson's Zouaves Attacked. ' BALTIMORE, October VF.—The Norfolk Day Book, received this morning, contains a despatch from New Orleans, giving an account, of a surprise and attack made on Wilson's Zouaves, at Santa Rosa Island, on the 8th instant. Detachments from several Mississippi, Lousiana and Alabama regiments landed in the ni ght, drove in the pickets and had a fierce battle. The Zouaves are credited with having fought with great bravery, and the rebels admit a loss of forty killed and about double that j number wounded. They claim to have spiked the guns of the Zouaves and destroyed all their camp equipage. They claim to have committed i great slaughter among the Zouaves, but gave no numbers of the killed.— I They also carried off several prison- ; era. I

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Quakers at the South. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

Quakers at the South. The comparatively conservative character of North Carolina, wedged in, as she is, between disunion States , has long been remarked , and is unquestionably attributable to jthe large Quaker element still retained among her people, Recent events, however, have well-ni gh overpowered this element, in consequence of which many members of the Society of Friends are preparing to leave the State. In fact, many of them have already gone. The latter express their conviction that their mission as a religious people among slaveholders has ceased—that the door of their further usefulness has closed, and that the time for them to retire has come. From South Carolina they have long since entirely disappeared for the same cause ; and from Tennessee, where they have now but three yearty meetings, they are also said to be rapidly removing.—Philadelphia Press.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The British Steamer Bermuda. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

The British Steamer Bermuda. the steamer Bermuda, which recently escaped the blockade and got into Savannah with a valuable cargo, was purchased in, England bv the Confederate Government, on the condition of her delivery in the port of Savannah. Immediately after a storm -which compelled the blockading fleet to move out to sea, she ran into port. The Bermuda is an iron clad vessel, and of about 1,500 tons burden. She sailed from Liverpool on the 28th of August, and arrived at Savannah on the 16th of September, being twenty-nine days on the passage. Her cargo consisted of 18 rifled cannon, 32s and 42s, and two 168 pound Lancaster guns, with all the necessary carriages and equipments, powder, shot and shell, all ready for immediate use.— Also, 6,500 Enfield rifles, between 200,000 and 300,000 cartridges for the same, 6,000 pairs of army shoes, 20,000 blankets, 180 barrels of gunpowder, large quantity of morphine, quinine and other medicine stores, and very many other articles ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Paducah in Danger. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

Paducah in Danger. Exciting times are apprehended at Paducah, Kentucky. It is reported forty thousand rebels, under Johnston are advancing towards that place.— Our troops are preparing for their reception, and women and children are being removed from the place in anticipation of a severe struggle.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
|jni aito §mmt. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 23 October 1861

|jni aito §mmt. THE SOLDIER'S GRAVE.—The War Department has, with wise forethought, issued a series of regulations for military burials, and the registration of deceased soldiers and their graves, showing date and place of burial, transfers of corps, and other records, so as to enable friends to find the graves of their dead loved ones. Each grave is to have its number, in the order of interment, distinctly indicated upon a head sign of cedar, or some other enduring wood , the name of deceased, date of death , and his company or regimental corps initials being engraved thereon.— These various records are to be preserved in the Surgeon-General's office in Washington, and are to be forever open for the .inspection of friends of the deceased. There is a deep pathos in the soldier's grave far away from home—tombs in the battle field, overgrown with grasses and flowers ! And those left behind will find consolation in the fact that the tenderest humanities are to be observed toward ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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