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Title: Illinois Farmer Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,057 items from Illinois Farmer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Facts abont Forest Trees . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

Facts abont Forest Trees . For the Illinois Farmer . VIRDEN , May 9 , 1857 . Among the- many kinds of trees of rapid growth , comprising the forests of Illinois , there is one kind in the cultivation of which I have had some experience ; it is valuable alike for useful , and ornamental purposes . I allude to the soft maple . It is of very rapid growth and is easily propagated by seed . The seed falls in this country about the sixth ot June ; they should be gathered immediately and planted in the same manner as Osage Orange or garden peas . If they are well cultivated , and the season is favorable , they will grow to the height 2 J or 3 feet the first year , and will be ready to transplant the following spring , for artificial groves or nursery stock . Plants one year from seed are best to use in making new timber plantations , because they are cheaper , more apt to grow and easier to haniie . Last year , although the drouth injured other crop 3 , the maple seed sprouted finely and c...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
¦ « . The Coining Corn Cron . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

¦ « . The Coining Corn Cron . Editor of the Farmer : We have had the best kind of weather for putting in our corn ; The season has been cool , so that our teams could do a great deal of work , and the ground is in the best order . But I am told that the corn used for seed is not in many cases good , and that it will be likely to rot in the ground . This would be a great calamity , considering the lateness of the season . It may be too late now to cry for spilled milk , ^ but we may learn some facts , b y dear experience , which may be Useful to us . We shoujd secure our corn for seed in the fall . This can be done with little expense ; and it should not be neglected . Cora will germinate if gathered from the field when in the dough . The process is simple . Go into your field and select the largest , finest , earliest ears , when the corn is in the dough . Take off the ears , leaving on them some of the inner husks . Hang them or place them where they will dry without moulding , and...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
< o » The Orchard . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

&amp;lt; o » The Orchard . Mr . EDITOR : I passed by an orchard the other day—a beautiful and promisng one , too—audit was calling out to its owner for help , to enable it to live under the attacks of an eaemy . It spoke as plainly as trees could speak . Caterpillars were upon the trees and were spreading oat their nets over the youBg leaves and blossoms , apparently with the determination to rob them of their beautiful foilage and fruit , and if not kdl them . There was no voice in the air except that still , small voice addressed to the reason of man , to his love of the good fruit that God bad proffered to him , as a reward of his care and industry , and which ought to find a responss in every man whose heart is in the right place . The caterpillar is an enemy which can be seen and can easily be destroyed . They disfigure the trees—destroy the fruit ; and seriously injure , if not kill them—and , besides they pronounce the owner slothful —too much so to save his fruit , thoug...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Yonng Orchards . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

Yonng Orchards . EDITOR ILLINOIS FARMER : The last winter was hard on young orchards . Probably the trees if set out this spring , they may have been injured the winter before . If the young trees show unhealthful limbs or heads , they should be cat back ; that is , the would should be . cut off until you come to healthy wood . This is lees to be regretted in our open prairies ; because low headed trees will do better there than it suffered to grow high and thus be exposed to heavy and destructive winds . Peaches do better also by being cut back , and many think that they do better as a large spreading shrub from the ground than as a tree . Indeed , a tree suffered to grow high , with a lsng naked limbs , will be either be broken down by heavy winds orwill bedestroyed by heavy loads of fruit , which act as a weight upon a lever . There is a great deal of bloom upon the apple trees ; and where , there peach trees alive , they promise fruit . The wild apple and plum are . full of flow...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
. »> Prepare in Time . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

. »&amp;gt; Prepare in Time . EDITOR or THE FARMER : Many of our . farmers would save themselves much bother , anxiety and expense if they would prepare for contingencies in time . Our seasons are uncertain and we should prepare for contingencies . Last winter was a lm . c- winter . As a general fact there was not sufficient grain and fodder saved for stock . . Many farmers and cattle suffered . The same , state of things may recur again . Let us prepare in time Many farmers have but little meadow . Fodder can be made of corn by sowing broadcast , and cutting and saving it early before the time of seeding is come . Millet can be managed in the same way , producing heavy crops . Euta Baga , it sown early , often produces a plentiful crop ;; and the Maquel Wurlzell , a large beet for stock , can always be made to grow on good land—producing an immense amount of roots . Straw should be saved—everything that vill answer for fodder should be saved—and you will find your advantage in ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Sheep-Wool . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

Sheep-Wool . The late severe winters , the high price of mutton , and the very great inducements which farmers have had latterly to go into the raising of wheat , have probably lessened the number of sheep in this country , and the result will be that our wool growers will obtain very high prices for their wool the present season . It is doubted whether the clip in Illinois the present year , will equal that of the last . In the article we copy below from a New York paper , it is said that the coarse wooled sheep in New York , are taking the place of the fine wooled , and that there coarse wooled sheep are grown for mutton . In our own State we do not think this is the case . Fine wooled sheep make excellent mutton , but the coarser wooled are selected and killed and the fine preserved . In Illinois , fine wooled sheep pay much better than the coarse ; and we do not know of any persons , who made themselves acquainted with the business of growing sheep , and who have steadily contin...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
THE GRAZIER [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

THE GRAZIER Green Food for Stock . It is often the case that farmers and others would find it a convenience to keep up some of their stock , at least in portions of the season , when there is poor feed in pastures . Especially would this be a convenience in the case of mileh cows . July , August and September , are the most trying months with them . Corn sown broadcast in June , and plowed in , makes a-capital food cut green . Many farmers in the northern part of Ohio every year sow fields for this purpose , and the practice is constantly increasing . From the little experience that has been had with the Chinese sugar cane , it is believed that it will furnish a richer and better article for green food than corn ; and besides being by far a richer plant , has this advantage—it may be cut at least twice in the season . We trust our farmers will not only try this plant for the purpose of making sugar and molasses , but for forage , green and dry . A few seed , a pint or more , will fu...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
AGRICULTURAL . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

AGRICULTURAL . Sweet Potatoes . Messrs . J . W , Tenbrook &amp;amp; Co ., are large and successful cultivators of the Sweet Po- • tatoe , in Rockville , Ind . They have a variety , called Early Nansemond , which we have not seen surpassed for beauty or excellence . His experience gives « o the following article great value : Brief Directions for Planting and Cultivating the Sweet Potato . Select land for this crop that is loose and dry , that is either sandy or a light clay loam , and not too rich , or the crop will run too much to vine ; wet prairies , rich bottom and black walnut lands are . the most unfavorable . Rolling land , either in the prairies , or timber , is preferable , and in the north , should be selected if possible sloping to the south or southeast , and if elevated would be less subject to white frosts in the spring aud fall . To avoid cutworms and weeds , the Sweet Potatoe ground should have been cleanly cultivated the season previous , and plowed late in the ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Drill Seeding . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

Drill Seeding . &amp;lt;« From the Country Gsntleman . In the fall of 1853 , 1 engaged . a man who owned a drill to oonie and sow six acres with wheat in a field of ten acres . The part sown with the drill was the poorest and farthest from the barn ; consequentl y had not received-so much manure as the other . , The remaining four aores were sown broadcast . At the time of harvesting , the drilled wheat was much the best—prooably four or five bushels to the . acre . The same season , ( some time the last of Sept . ) I had another piece sowed with a drill clover sod , second crop ; the green clover turned under would hay probably lj tons to the acre ) r ^ of a long triangular form . The outside was sowed with a drill . A strip nearly the whole length of the piece in the middle , of about three-quaf-ters of an acre , was sown broadcast . At the time of harvesting , the drilled wheat would yield 25 bushels an acre , while that sown broadcast would only go about three or four , and ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Use of Arsenic in Steeping Grain for . Seed . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

Use of Arsenic in Steeping Grain for . Seed . Boussingault has oomruunicated to the Annates deChimic some experiments on the use of arsenic in steepinggrain for seed . The process has two objects , the one to protect the harvest from disease , the other to prevent the seed from being devoured by vermin . The . substances generally used are salt , glauber salt , lime and sulphate of copper . But although these may hinder the development of cryptogamie sporules , they have little effect in preventing the seed from being eaten . Tbe greatest part of the substance used remains in the husk , which the animal rejects . The most effectual means is the employment of arsenic ; this not only preserves the seed from decay , but if eaten by the vermin , it destroys them , being so strongly poisonous . By using arsenic in a soluble form , such as the arsenite of soda , it may be added to the grain in perfectly definite proportions . Boussmgault s process is as follows : —A solution of arsenite o...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Over-Feeding Plants . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

Over-Feeding Plants . A correspondent of the American Agriculturist writes : I have found by experience that yonng fruit trees and some flowering shrubs wers often injured by over-feeding . For many years I lost all my cherry trees . I planted them around my yards , and gave them the richest soil 1 could gather . They grew finely ; some bore good crops . In a few years tbey split from the branches to the roots , and in a few years more they died . I fonnd in journals that this splitting was supposed to be induced by the heat of the sun , for tbey generally occurred on the southwest side of the trouk , where the sun shone the hottest . I soon observed , however , that , the cherry trees never split when they grew on a poor soil ; so when I discovered them to check , I at once removed all the soil for five or six feet around them and supplied its place with loam or poor gravelly matter . Since then , not one has split , and I presume they never will . When cherry trees are large and o...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Practical Hints on the Culture of Tines . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

Practical Hints on the Culture of Tines . From the Ohio Cultivator WATER MELONS . SOIL AND LATINO OUT . —The best soil for the water melon is a rich blaok loam , such as our black ash swales , well drained and plowed very deep , and thoroughly pulverized . The rows should be marked out at least ten feet apart each way . I know that it looks like wasting land when planting , and in the early tending of the crop ; but the reverse is true—if you wish to lose the use of your land and also your labor , plow about five or six inches deep , and plant four or five feet apart eaoh way , and you will be very sure to succeed . SEED AND PLANTING . —The next all important point is to select good seed ; which is not difficult , as they can be obtained at almost any country town of any size . But most persons plant any thing , rather than pay fifty cents or a dollar for good seeds . The Mountain Sweet is the best in the list . I always buy tbe Wetherfiald seeds , and have ever found them true to t...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Large vs . Small Beans . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

Large vs . Small Beans . I tried an experiment last season , to satisfynyself ,- which were the better beans to plant , and give you tbe result as follows : The small beans give nine and a half bushels from one of planting , and the large ones thirteen and three quarters from one of planting . The land was light , as you see by the crop , but equal in both cases . I concede that a bushel of small beans will plant as much land as three bushels of large oues , and many will conclude from this that there are four dollars saved in the item of seed . To such I would say , dont be hasty , gentlemen . Dont you have to plant three times as many hills to get oat a bushel of small as you do ol large beans —and then they fall four bushels short of the large ones in product . Here then is a saving in favor of the large beans of one-fourth in product from a given quantity of seed . I plant beans north and south , if possible , roWB three feet apart , and eighteen inches apart in the row , about ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
HORTICULTURAL [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

HORTICULTURAL We have long supposed that the failure of the Heart Cherry in this region was caused by the exceeding richness of the soil . In the same latitude , east of the mountains in poor soil , Heart Cherry trees grow to a large size , and , it is said , will last tor a century . Mulching , This is a term used by horticulturists for shading the ground around growing trees , shrubs and plants . There are many plants so delicate in their structure , that they absolutely require mulching the first summer , to insure their roots a firm hold in the ground . But as most of our summers are so dry . and hot , there are few plants that are not benefitted by mulching . If the ground around fruit trees is cleared of the weeds and grass , and mulched with leaves or straw , immediately after a rain , the tree will be invigorated , and a fine crop of fruit will be the reward . Roses that are wilting , and showing aisickly bloom will be revived , and bloom in beauty , by mulching when the gro...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
THE GARDENER [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

THE GARDENER Garden vegetables will be late in maturing this season . Many of the seeds sown early will be lost , and perhaps even the second sowing . Most varieties , however , do well planted any time in May or the first half of June . The ground is now warm and the temperature such as to force their rapid growth . If the weather should continue favorable , the latest planted gardens will be the best . There is now ample time to plant the seeds of cucumbers , melons , squashes , beets , beans , corn , lettuce , olcra , peas , radishes , salsify , spinach , turnips ; -cabbage plants for . winter use can be put in the three first weeks of June . Hoeing and stirring the ground abont vegetables , greatly accelerate their growth . The man who hoed his cabbages once a day to beat his neighbor , was surprised to find that the plants of the latter kept ahead of his own . The secret was his neighbor hoed his twice a day . ¦ . GARDEN PEAS . —Persons are not generally aware , that these peas...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
THE FLORIST [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

THE FLORIST The garden shrubbery the present season will exhibit an unusual amount of bloom and beauty . The double flowering cherry , peach and almond , have already dropped their flowers . The lilacs and snow balls are in their glory . Several varieties of the spirae are in flower , and these unappreciated beauties will ere long be favorites in the parterre . The Wieglea Rosea is in full bloom , and its pink flowers show beautifully among the green leaves of the plant : they resemble greatly the Azelias of the green house . The upright honeysuckles are also in flower . and these miniature trees , when properly trained , make a fine show in borders . The season of hyacinths and tulips has passed . The dielytra is now in full flower , and is in our opinion , the most beautiful of all the perennial herbaceous flowering plants . Perfectly hardy , it springs up early in spring and is in flowers with the lilac , and these continue a long time . Indeed , where the ground is rich , it has...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
EDITORIAL NOTICES [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

EDITORIAL NOTICES The Season and the Prospect . The almost cheerless spring , preceded by a long and dreary winter , has closed . The leafy month of June , is upon ns ; and the fine weather , and th &amp;amp; abounding and rapidly advancing vegetation , almost make us forget the past . Most farmers ( and we should be sorry to believe that every one has not done it , ) who under all the discouragements of spring , steadily went forward in the preparation of their . grounds and in the planting of seed for future crops , have a fair prospect of abundant harvests . The . early spring graius are looking well ; generally , the corn is coming up well ; early p lanted potatoes promise a fine return ; meadows are rapidly improving ; the orchards are loaded with fruit ; health is every where ; and farmers are receiving for the produce they have now to sell , good prices , and the prospect in advance is altogether promising . Rarely is it the case that industry , guided by judgment , and a...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
<?? - Emigration . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

&amp;lt;?? - Emigration . The ceaseless stream of emigration from theeast , seems to increase in volume as time progresses . We must suppose that business and the value of property in the east , is seriously affected by this emigration . Long lines of cars on the Chicago and Mississippi road , are constantly filled with emigrants . They are wending their way to Kansas-and Nebraska in such numbers as must soon give to those territories a , large population . These are but a small proportion of the numbers of emigrants who are pouring into the west . Crowds are rushing to Minesota and western Iowa ; and vast numbers are locating in our own State . The lines of our railroads are , being settled by eastern emigrants , who rapidly change , our beautiful prairie lands , into well cultivated farms . An eastern man in two years time , will make of wild prairie a capital farm , and surround himself with many of the comforts of home . Southern Illinois is receiving many accessions to her ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
"In Peace Prepare for War !" [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

In Peace Prepare for War ! And in summer prepare for winter ! Distinguished men who have made meteorology their study , by examining the history of the seasons for the past one hundred and fifty years or more , have come to the conclusion that there is usually a series of warm winters , continued for somo ten years , and afterwards a series of cold and long winters for the same length of time . These savans gave it as their opinion two years ago , that we were entering upon the series of cold uud long winters . The two late winters show that they did not err in their judgment ; and we have reason to believe , judging from the past , that some coming winters may further confirm their opinions . Be this so , or not , we have been sufficiently admonished that farmers should , as a gener al thing , be better provided with fodder for their stock than they were for the two last winters . They should preserve their straw , their corn fodder , hay , aud if necessary , they should go to the ...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
"lake Food !" [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 June 1857

lake Food ! Why is it that provisions , of all descriptions , over every part of the United States , are bringing the present high prices ? This question is being pressed upon the attention of our people every where . There must be a cause for it , perhaps many causes , and it would be well if we considered them . In the eastern States , the soils , never rich , are are to some extent exhausted of their fertility , and they do not produce as heavy crops as formerly . Agriculture , not paying well , farmers sons have crowded into the towns , into the manufactories , into mechan-ics-shops and stores and into the professions . There are far • more producers than consumers . Good business times has thrown into their hands means , and they have lived well , paying such enticing prices for western beef cattle and hogs , that they have drained the west to an alarming extent . In the west , too , men are speculating . There are more loafers in our towns , who make their living by their wits...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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