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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,990 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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COLUMBIA COLLEGE, NEW YORK CITY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

COLUMBIA COLLEGE, NEW YORK CITY. SCHOOL OF ARTS. Examinations for admission are held on the first Wednesday in June, and on the Wednesday next preceding the first Monday in October, and at any time during the term, but not during vacation. Candidates from other colleges must present certificates of dismission in good standing. The annual tuition fee is one hundred dollars, payable at the beginning of each scholastic year. Provision is made for free tuition in certain cases. The first term begins annually on the first Monday in October; the second, immediately after the intermediate examination in February [February 5, TBBO]. The next scholastic year will begin October 4, 1880. Examinations for admissions will be held June 2 and September 29, 1880. SCHOOL OF MINES. There are five regular courses of instruction, viz.: Mining Engineering, Civil Engineering, Metallurgy Geology and Paloeontology ; Analytical and Applied Chemistry. Candidates for the first class, at its formation, must be...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Current Topics. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

Current Topics. THE time for the question of Goodwood is drawing near, and, as affairs now look, Eighty-one will not abolish. A word, therefore, to the juniors : If you must have the Goodwood, let there be no ill-feeling about it. Let everything be done openly and squarely. By all means discountenance trickery, even if it should be parliamentary. You can accomplish all the above by determined effort, and in the name of the college we ask you to try. HE fall meeting of the C. C. A. A. will be held Nov. Bth, 1879, at Mott Haven, and promises to be of unusual interest. The action of the Association in making all runs and walks handicap, thus ensuring to all an equal chance, is very commendable, and we prophesy that numerous entries, large fields, and exciting races will be the result of this wise policy. The introduction of a bicycle race will lend additional interest, while the reduction of the price of admission to twenty-five cents cannot fail to be popular. We are informed that Mye...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Class Day. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

Class Day. question of the revival of Class Day is being vigorously discussed among the members of the Senior Class and the project seems to meet with but little opposition. After having been in college for three years, the class of 'BO have at last found something upon which they can unite. Thus it is probable that one of Columbia's oldest and pleasantest customs will this year be resurrected from the grave of oblivion to which it has been consigned for four long years. The advantages of such a celebration are manifold and this seems a most favorable time for its revival. The completion of new buildings marks an era in Columbia's history and it would be appropriate that this era should be made memorable by the reintroduction of class-day. It has so many agreeable and interesting features, and is so distinctively a student's celebration, that it is a great shame it was ever dropped. It is the only opportunity afforded the students to invite their friends to visit, examine and admire...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Education and the State.* [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

Education and the State.* a copy of an address by President Barnard, which has been kindly furnished us, we make the following extracts. In re.gard to the multiplication of colleges our President says: " I do not object to many colleges because they are many, nor to small colleges because they are small. If they are all equally good, and are really good, it matters not, educationally speaking, how many there are. We cannot have too much of a good thing. But that a college may be a good college, it must be well endowed ; for without ample resources it can neither possess the instrumentalities which are indispensable to thorough instruction, nor command the men most competent to use the instrumentalities. * * * With an undue multiplication of collegiate instructions, the human probability is that quality will not remain the same. And if it does not, then the public suffers not only in an economical but also in an educational sense. " But the evil resulting from this cause would not be...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A Dreadful Warning. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

A Dreadful Warning. YE Freshmen ! gather round, And unto this story list, For the moral that it contains Is a valuable one, I wist. A many years ago When the College was new and trim, There was a student here Who studied with a vim. He didn't study with a view, His examinations to pass, But to scoop a fellowship or two, And stand at the head of his class. His uniform mark was maximum And the blue eye glass he wore, And his diet was said to consist Of oatmeal and classic lore. One morning he came to College With a cold, and his throat was sore, As badly used up as a walkist When the "go as you please" is o'er. That day a Prof, made an annual joke. For the class to howl with glee Was the prehistoric custom, But our freshman no laugh gave he. To a dreadfully low position That freshman straightway fell, And the rest of his mournful story The College records tell. He was flunked in fourteen studies. And suspended for years a score, And departed for Northern Africa, And never was heard of...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
On Shaking Hands. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

On Shaking Hands. nrHERE are shakes and shakes. How many people are there who shake hands in what may be called an agreeable manner? We all shake hands because it is the thing to do, and it is the customary way of greeting a person, but there are very few who perforn this delicate operation in a way which would make' the "shakee" desirous of having his (or her) hand grasped again in a similar manner. It is said " cold hand, warm heart," but shaking hands with warm-hearted people is an unpleasant duty when the coldness of their hands indicates the amount of caloric contained in their hearts. The cold hand sends a chill up through your spinal marrow, causing you to imagine it had suddenly congealed, and was taking the form of an elongated icicle. There is also the toad-like grasp, which some are fond of bestowing on all whom they meet, and which gives you the impression that an animated corpse had risen from the grave to salute you, or else that the owner must be some sort of a gigant...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
A Song of Note. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

A Song of Note. MINE name it vas AugustusShmidtz, Und I'm a Charman man ; I sells dose peer und pretzels, Und oysters ven I gan. Mine blace has lots of pissiness, Und also lots of noise, For its agross der streedt from dose Golumbia Goledge poys. Von day some of dose Zophomores Gome over to mine blace, Und orteredpeer und pretzels, Und also Schwitzer Kase. Ven dey had dronk all vot dey could, Und couldn't ead no more, Von of dem gried out do me " Powlie, vot is der schore ? " I guivekly prought it to dem (It was dree sigsdty-nine), But der veller vot asked vor it Vas a grinning all der dime, Und shlapped me on der shoulter Und said : " Powlie olt ploat, Ve aint have got some money Zo ve pays you mit a note." I prought him bens und baper, Put ingk in der ingkstandt, Und he zat down to der table, Mit de bensdick in his hant, Und wrote : "Ve don't got money, Ve don't knowvere to porrow, So ve vill bay Augustus Shmitz Dree sigsdy-nine do-morrow." I voided up dot baper, Mit gare put it a...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
An Interesting Topic. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

An Interesting Topic. T rHAT about Goodwood, this year? is the * question asked of and by the juniors every day. From the numerous conversations on the subject the following has been collated : There are a select few who are most emphatically in favor of it. These, however, were afterwards ascertained to be candidates. Each has at least two backers, who are equally enthusiastic for their friends' sakes. A second class state that their objections are mainly that they could not obtain it for themselves, or their personal friends. They do not openly talk so, but reason that it is unfair to name one man as a standard of popularity. Another number, and these are truly sincere, say that Goodwood has of late years been the cause of so much class feeling and trouble, that they do not want to give it in their class. They rightly add, that it is a poor plan to make enemies among their classmates by the bitter fight which they claim will follow. They state that the former classes being so smal...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
From A. B. C. to (C.) B. A. An Incremental. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

From A. B. C. to (C.) B. A. An Incremental. F AY ' !■ r Fred, f May, ) Ned, j Each girl One loves, Both purl Like doves. Fred and Ned Older grow, Good-bye's said — Off they go. Far College Halls Receive each boy ; All parties, balls, One girl annoy. Sweet May pines for Ned, Whom she seldom sees ; Her heart, which has bled, Now to ice does freeze. Not so coquettish Fay, No lover her can pain ; Believes not what they say, But laughs them down again. Now — : Four years have passed away, Ned the first the stage ascends ; And on this most glorious day, Proudly gazes at his friends. What is it that now makes him stare, Whilst gazing at a box above ? Fie sees two girls ; one passing fair, He knows her now ; his own old love. The " Fall of Empires" a hard-worked theme, Fades from his mind as tints fade by night ; Footlight and boxes, seen in a dream, Nothing is real, save his sad plight. Ideas return. Purpose and prompters aid, Avert the dreadful fall. She sends a rose, And for that rose Ne...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Foot Ball. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

Foot Ball. COLUMBIA VS. STEVENS. PjUR second match at foot-ball was played on the grounds of the St. George Cricket Club, Hoboken, on Saturday, October 25th, with Stevens Institute. The weather was very raw, and the strong wind prevented many from witnessing the game. The teams were made up as follows : COLUMBIA. — Forwards —Remington, 'B3 ; Lawson, 'B2 ; Patten, 'Bl ; Octaviano, 'B3 ; Clarke, S. of L. ; Henry, 'B2 ; Haussling, 'BO ; Francke, 'BO, and Trask, 'BO. Half-backs —Potts, 'BO ; Trowbridge, 'BO, and Weaver, S. of L. Quarterback —De Forest,'B2. Backs —Morgan, 'BO, Captain, and Simpkins, 'B3. STEVENS. — Forwards —Leib, 'BO ; Barry, 'BO ; Moore, 'B2 ; Rilsenberger, post graduate ; Kursheedt, 'BO ; McNaughton, 'B3, and Butler, 'B2. Half-backs —Merritt, 'B7 ; Denton, postgraduate ; Hyslop, 'Bl, and Aspenwall, 'Bl. Quarterbacks —Pracy, 'Bl, Captain. Backs —Coe, 'B3 ; Wright, 'B2, and Howell, 'Bl. B. P. Clark, 'B2, Umpire for Columbia ; F. P. Jones did the same duty for Stevens, a...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Hannibal Ante Portas Est! [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

Hannibal Ante Portas Est! OR, THE CRIBBER'S TALE. (See Cartoon.') TO me, whilst lounging on the college green, Once came a woeful junior, heavy-hearted, Of all the juniors I have ever seen Like this one, none had seemed from joy so parted ; Or showed such mien To me whilst lounging on the college green. For juniors, though they sometimes seem to work. Are seldom (to the naked eye) despairing— Oft come to chapel, lectures never shirk, Leave with the soph'more class their faults most glaring. But dangers lurk For juniors, though they sometimes seem to work. Long stood he there, and cooled his fevered brow : " Sloper," said I, " why do you look so glum ? Take comfort in this weed ; say, what's the row ? Relate what's happened, and think me your chum." I see him now, As he stood there and cooled his fevered brow. " Put not your trust in cribs ; through them I fell ! " So first he sadly spoke ; then told his story: " Four years my father wished me here to dwell, Then, as B. A., to come b...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
About College. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

About College. '"T* HE freshmen have elected Rossiter captain of their crew. GLOVER, 'BI, will play in a concert that is to take place in Brooklyn early in December. VAN DOREN, '79, is Professor of Latin and Greek in a Young Ladies' Seminary in Brooklyn. BE sure to go either to the regatta, or else to see the game of foot-ball with Princeton, tomorrow. OUR foot-ball team defeated the Alumni at Prospect Park on the 18th of October. Score, one goal to nothing. WHY does not 'B3 brace up, and send some voices to the choir ; we hear there are some good singers in the class. THE junior class has returned to something like its former size, many of the doubtful ones having passed their exams. ANTHON HALL had its house-warming on Oct. 28th, the occasion being the meeting of the National Academy of Sciences. OUR team plays Princeton on her own grounds on Nov. 1 st. Yale, at New Haven on election day, and the University of Pennsylvania on November Bth, at Philadelphia. THE Senior Club has made...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Fixtures. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

Fixtures. Nov. i st. Autumn Regatta on the Harlem. Foot-ball match with Princeton, at Princeton. Nov. 3d. Entries close for Athletic Sports. Nov. 4th. Foot-ball match with Yale, at New Haven. Nov. Bth. Autumn Sports (handicap) at Mott Haven, 2.15 P. M. Nov. 15th. Foot-ball match with University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia. EPITAPH. Here lies Bojesen. Here lie his Grecian Iniquities, ANTIQUITIES. We have lost our dear Bojesey ; In his place, 70hat's worse, we've got List, O classmates ! while zue tell you, Anglo-Saxon tinder Scott. A CHALLENGE from Yale was received early in October, but we were compelled to decline, and the following came in reply to our answer : 225 Durfee, Oct. 25th, '79. Mr. W. F. Morgan : Dear Sir, Your challenge for Nov. 4th, game to be played here, is hereby accepted, on the terms before written, namely, that we will pay your expenses. Very truly, MR. W. F. MORGAN, JOHN H. BARNES New York. Sec'y Yale F. B. C. As November 4th is a holiday we hope all who c...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Columbia at Houghton. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

Columbia at Houghton. 11. arrival was esteemed an event of considerable importance by the people of the town, and we soon became known as " the students." Several gentlemen in the town had formed themselves into a boat club, and very kindly placed at our disposal their boats, an eight-oared barge and two four-oared shells. We gladly availed ourselves of their hospitality, and found that Portage Lake was an excellent rowing course, troubled with no tide or current, and well sheltered from the wind by the surrounding hills. We brought with us several bats and balls, and a set of boxing-gloves. As everybody did not care to row we had a party for base-ball every evening. We went over the lake to practise, and after playing a couple of evenings we received a challenge from the Hancock nine to play them a match game on Saturday afternoon, June 28th. Although they had existed as a nine for three or four years, and we knew we would be badly beaten, nevertheless, with the characteristic pluc...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Mines. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

School of Mines. T7 L- WISE, formerly of 'Bl, is dead. JAMES RANDOLPH, formerly of '76, was married last Sept, at Bethalem, N. J. AT the Class meeting of 'B2 W. H. Cooper was elected Pres. ; E. L. Young, V. Pres. ; E. F. Ferris, Seer. ; E. Kalbfleish, Treas. ; D. B. Falk, Hist. THE Class of 'B3 met on Oct. 15th in Prof. Trowbridge's room and elected the following officers for one month : Pres., Mr. Wood ; Seer., Mr. Sutro ; Treas., Mr. Dusenbery. THE 36th regular meeting of the Chemical Society was held on Thursday, Oct. 23d. A quorum not being present, nothing was done in the way of business or papers. FROM a private letter written by a graduate of the School of Mines, who is in Leadyille, we learn that ten former members of the school attended Gen. Vinton's funeral on horseback. THE regular meeting of the Engineering Society was held on Friday evening, Oct. 24th. No business was transacted. Mr. Greenleaf read a paper on Building Stone, which was followed by one on Silver Islet, by...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Alumni Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

Alumni Notes. '67. DR. JOHN A. CHURCH has an office at 115 Broadway, room 75. He has resumed his professional practice of mining engineer and expert. It is probable that Dr. Church has resigned the chair of Mining and Metallurgy which he occupied at the Ohio State University. '69. J. O. F. RANDOLPH was absent in Ohiuahua, Mexico, during July and August. He was professionally occupied examining the mines of that region. 73. DR. H. A. MOTT, JR., has a new book on the tapis, it is to be published during the latter part of this year and the subject is on milk. '75. DR. D. A. JOY has been re-appointed assistant in Chemistry at a largely increased salary so that he will probably be at the University of Michagan for at least another year. PROF. J. K. REES, Avas elected General Secretaiy for the Boston Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, to be held next year, 1880. This year he acted as Secretary to the Section A. (on Mathematics and kindred subjects). '76. L...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Law. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

School of Law. UP HE school now numbers 417. PROF. DILLON will probably commence his lectures to the Senior Class, on Equity, about the 10th of next month. THE Moot Court opened on Friday last, and Prof. Chase prepared the arguments by monitions against lengthy speeches, personalities, and bunkum, remarking that it was out of place to follow the example of some gentlemen who in previous years had shown a disposition, with Webster, to "behold for the last time," &c. The case was all about a derrick which a railroad company had employed to raise, stone, and with which some children raised the "very deuce," and ground off each other's fingers, -and on this ground their guardian ad litem sought to raise the wind against the railroad company, but the jury thought that derricks were not good things for guardians to raise children on by about 60 to 8. FOR a moot court case, we would suggest the following, taken from the World: About one year ago a showman was going around in Gi...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Our Exchanges. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

Our Exchanges. r 1 HE Nassau Lit for October is before us and an excellent number it is. There is always something interesting in both the Nassau and Yale Lits., which we particularly enjoy. The "College Gossip" in the former paper is a department we always turn to first, and rarely do we find it weak. While you would at once recognize that it was a Princeton man writing, yet you are sure to find the subjects treated in a fair and impartial manner. This number opens with a Prize Essay. Then follows a Prize Oration, which, we think, is the best piece in this number. THE second number of the Harvard Lampoon contains several well-meant suggestions, with illustrations, concerning three new Professorships. The last one mentioned seems to us the one most needed, i.e., a Professorship of Decorative Art. The picture of the Lampoon s nominee, a tattoed cannibal, accompanying this suggestion, is most appropriate, and we do not doubt but that the University will take Lampy's hint and follow up...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The College World. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

The College World. CORNELL: — The Era conducted the Autumn Games in which the 220 yds. dash was won in "somewhere about 25 sec." F. W. Smith has been elected senior President, and W. A. Huntley, Vice-President. A Lawn Tennis Club has been organized among the Comedians. Scarcely fifty persons were present at a lecture upon Beethoven, while the night before the Opera House was crowded to hear Madame Rentz's troupe play "Pinafore." HARVARD : As yet no one has taken Chinese. A Chess Club has been formed, and expects to send a representative to the American Chess Congress, that is to be held in New York this winter, j. A. C. Wright, 'Bl, was elected Secretary. The freshmen eleven were defeated in football by the Phillips Exeter Academy team, one goal and three touch-downs, to nothing for 'B3. Distinction in the graduating degrees is now in three grades. First, cum laude , 75 per cent., provided 65 per cent, has been attained for the whole course, or 70 per cent, for last three years, or ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Shavings. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 31 October 1879

Shavings. TT is not true that Yale's defeats last summer were caused by her crew and nine getting accidentally interchanged. — Advocate. "MY SON," said a fond father, " emulate the mule ; he is always backward in deeds of violence." — Ex. SEVERAL young graduates have dropped into the New York Tribune office lately, to inquire : " Have you all the Macaulays you want on the local ?" — Cincinnati Commercial. AN instructor in Botany recently asked : " If you plant an annual, what will come up ?" Some of the division thought it would be a semi-annu-al ; but the majority answered ; " A condition." —Ex. Instructor in Ethics. —" The subject which we are about to study has been called Moral Philosophy." Man who asks questions. —" Can there be such a thing, sir, as an immoral philosophy ?" (Class woods up).— Crimson. THE mad rumor that the London Punch has been in negotiation for a genuine joke arose simply from the fact that one of the editors was seen talking with an American. The conservat...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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