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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 89 INDIAN LORE. INDIAN COSMOGONY. Once the world was all water, and God lived alone. He was lonesome, He had no place to put His foot, so He scratched the sand up from the bottom and made the land, and He made the rocks, and He made the trees, and He made a man; and the man had wings, and could go anywhere. The man Vas lonesome, and God made a woman. They eat fish from the water, and God mado the deer and other animals, and He sent the man to hunt and told the woman to cook the meat and dress the skins. Many more men and women grew up, and they lived on the banks of the great river, whose waters were full of salmon. The mountains contained much game, and there were buffalo on the plains. There were so many people that the stronger ones sometimes oprossed the weak and drove them from the best fisheries, which they claimed as their own. They fought, and nearly all wero killed, and their bones are to be seen on the hills yet. God was very angry at this, and He took...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

mmmmmmmmm 90 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. to dry while the tallow was stripped of the flakes. In the dry prairie atmos phere one day is usually sufficient to cure the meat without the aid of salt or smoke. When thus dried it is known as "jerked beef." While the meat is fresh, for the first day or two, the camp is the scene of constant feastings, the juicy steaks or the sweet ribs being kept broiling over the fire in one tepee or another until far into the night. It is the harvest home of the prairie tribes. As soon as the meat is dry the tepees are taken down and packed into the wagons along with the meat, and one family after another starts for home, until in a short time the great camp is a thing of the past. The jerked beef or venison is com monly prepared for eating bjr being boiled until reasonably tender. In eating the Indian takes a strip thus cooked, dips one end into a soup made by dissolving some salt in warm water, o takes the portion thus salted between .- his teeth, and saws of...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 91 the Indian drum, or the weird chorus of tho gaming song. Frequently there will be a party of twenty to thirty men gaming in one topee, and singing so that their voices can be heard far out from the camp, while from another topee a few rods away comes a shrill chorus from a group of women engaged in another game of the same kind. The players sit in. a circle around the tepee fire, those on one side of the fire playing against those on the other. The only requisites are the "button," or gagua, usually a bit of wood around which is tied a piece of string, or otter skin, with a pile of tally sticks. Each party has a "button," that of one side being painted black, the other being red. The leader of one party takes the button and endeavors to move it from one hand to another, or to pass it to a partner, while those of the opposing side keep a sharp lookout and try to guess in which hand it is. Those hav ing the button try to deceive their op ponents as to his where...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

mmmmmmmm 92 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Agnosticism versus Common Sense. The man that has an opportunity to travel through this our beautiful coun try meets with a great number of men who pride themselves in their boast of Agnosticism. For these Tom Paine and Col. Ingersoll, are gods who wid ened considerably the horizon of thought by inventing that being of reason, the subject of my article. They forget that these modern Hercules of giant thinking and daring aro mere kidnap ping thieves of ideas expressed nearly twenty centuries ago by a Julian, a Celsus, etc., and freshened in the mem ory of men by the sarcastic laugh of a Voltaire and the cloudy philosophy of a Rousseau. Longfellow said that, "Lives of great men all remind us, That we can make our lives sublime; And departing leave behind us Foot-prints on the sands of time." But rightly would have that wor shipper of Jesus refused to apply these words to Ingersoll, and others ejusdem farinae for the assertion of these men are as devoid...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

wiijpppjpwpiwiiwpi. mivimmmmmnm - ' ' lMH'"T" '"I m&T THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 03 Ttye ?gel of purgatory. How many sweet reminiscences this title recalls to a Christian mind "WHAT IS TIME?" I asked an aged man, a man of cares, Wrinkled and curved, and white with hoary hairs; "Time is the warp of life," he said. "Oh! tell The young, the fair, the gay to weave it well." I asked the ancient, venerahle dead, Sages who wrote and warriors who bled ; From the cold grave a hollow murmur flow'd : "Time sowed the seed, we reap in this abode!" I asked a dying sinner, ere the tide Of life had left his veins. " Time !" he replied ; "I've lost it! Ah ! the treasure," and he died. I asked the golden sun and silver spheres, Those bright chronometers of days and years. They answered : "Time is but a meteor's glare,'' And bade us for eternity prepare. I asked the seasons in their annual round, And they replied (no oracle more wise): " 'Tis Folly's blank and Wisdom's highest prize;" I asked a spirit l...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

94 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. believe in the heart, we must admit the existence of Purgatory, for, if it did not exist, it would be necessary to invent it for the consolation of the dead and the living. Observe, friends, what comfort this belief conveys. Enter a chamber of death; a brother dies, holding the hand of a brother, a son expires on the breast )f her who has given him life; all weep, because all hope. The dying man says, "Pray for me, I will pray for you, and we shall see each other again in Heaven." The desire of the heart is too powerful for resistance; the Protestants have eradicated the dogma from their minds, but not the belief from their hearts. It is the heart, friends, the heart which protests. Comfort yourselves, therefore, ye who have lost father or mother, husband or wife, brother or son. Console yourselves ye who have remained behind, and alone, as in a foreign land. No, no; death has not severed the links of affection which united you to the dear ones. They still lo...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 05 inquire of tradition. On overy side it answers. There is suffering by fire, and indeed St. Paul speaks of the river of fire which souls are obliged to traverse before arriving at salvation. And we hear the voice of the Prophet, inviting us to contemplate God seated on that shore, occupied in purifying souls. I hear St. Thomas say, "Lord, if the fire which thou hast given us in Thy mercy is the most terrible of all tor ments, what will that be which Thou hast created in Thy justice to punish sin?" But this, says St. Chrysostum, is the most supportable of all their punish ments. That which forms the worst trial of that place is the separation from God. Eveil here, kind reader, if you question your heart and ask it, "Why art thou so sad, 0 my soul?" it will answer by its groans and its sighs, "I suffer, because I am separa ted from the person I love, because between me and the object of my love there is a barrier." This is the true suffering of the souls in Purg...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1898

96 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. been taken all ho held most dear, the sky of his country, the air of his country, the joys of his country that "country" which has such an inex pressible power over generous hearts, and wrings from unhappy Poland those cries of grief whose echo reaches evn to our ears! How heart-rending are the groans and sighs of these poor exiles! Think of the mother who has lost her son, of the orphan who has undergone the sorrows of separation at a tender age, and imagine his life of privation. Imagine that of the wretched prisoner! Picture to yourself the poor widow, whose life has been crushed by an incurable grief, who has lost her best support the object of her love and care. These are the most heart-rending forms of grief with whicli we are acquainted. But what are these beside those of the souls in Purgatory? What is our country here, compared to that celestial country where all is smiling peace? What are the fathers of this world compared to the Father we have in H...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

mmsmisssBsmm The Indian Advocate Devoted to the Interests of the Indian Missions. jRw - Vol. X. OCTOBER, 1898. No. 4. INDIAN LORE. The seicha or Hut pipe is the sacred tribal medicine of the Arupaho. Ac cording to the myth it was given to their ancestors' at the beginning of the world after the Turtle had brought the earth up from under the water. It was delivered to them by the Duck, which was discovered swimming about on the top of the water after the emer gence of the land. At the same time they were given an ear of corn, from which comes all the corn of the world. The Arupaho lost the art of agriculture when they came out upon the buffalo plains, but the sacred pipe, the Turtle long since changed to stone, they have cherished to this day as their great medicine. The pipe, turtle and ear of corn are preserved among the northern Arapaho in Wyoming who claim to be the "mother people of the tribe. They are handed down in the keeping of a particular fumily from generution to generati...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

98 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. recito it, for fear of divine punishment should the slightest error be made in the narration. At the close of the recital the devotees send up their prayers for the blessings of which they stand in need, after which the medicine man again carefully wraps up the sacred objects in the skins. Before leaving the lodge the worshipers cover the bundle with tbeir offerings of blankets or other valuables, which are taken by the medicine keeper as his fee. When encamped in the tribal cirole the sacred pipe and its keeper occupy a large tepee, reserved espec ially for this purpose, which is set up within the circle and near its western line, directly opposite the doorway on the east. In the center of the circle between the doorway and the sacred tepee is the sweat-house of the warrior order. The taking down of the sacred tepee by the attendants of the pipe keeper is the signal for moving camp, and no other tepee is allowed to be taken down before it. When on the march,...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 99 to torvals, between the songs, more espec ially after the trances have begun, the dancers unclasp hands and sit down to smoke or talk for a ?qv minutes. At such time the leaders sometimes deliver short addresses or sermons, or relate the recent trance experience of the dancer. In holding each other's hands the dancers usually intertwine the fingers instead of grasping the hand as with us. Only an Indian could keep the blanket in place as they do under such circumstances. Old people hob bling along with sticks, and little children hardly past the toddling period sometimes form a part of the circle, the more vigorous dancers accommo dating the movement to their weakness. Frequently a woman will be seen to join the circle with an infant upon her back and dance with the others, but should she show the least sign of ap proaching excitement watchful friends lead her away that no harm may come to the child. Dogs are driven off from the neighborhood of the circle les...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

100 TELE INDIAN ADVOCATE. of the tribal life and is still performed at frequent intervals, although the feverish expectation of a few years ago has now settled down into something closely approaching the Christian hope of a reunion with departed friends in a happier world at some time in the un known future. OUR LADY AMONG THE MINERS. Before, and during several years after the advent of the Benedictine Fathers into the Indian Territory, the spiritual needs of the Catholic tribes, evangelized by the Jesuits before the red men were driven to the Territory, were ministered to by some zealous priests, who, crossing the border from Kansas, diligently sought and, not without great hardships, attended this otherwise neglected people. Thus the lamp of faith was kept burning brightly among these Indians, who but for this care, might have returned to the night of paganism, from which they had been rescued by theirbeloved "black gowns." A few white people, who at different times and under vari...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 101 rest than when lying in an Indian cabin, .in the neighborhood of the villages, where hospitality was so bountifully dispensed that even the floor would bo carpeted with wandering Indians, who dropped in and dropped down at any time and anywhere, so that it was impossible to rise in the morning, until those living rugs re moved themselves, to avoid being stopped upon by the sufferer who was honored with the loan of the only bed in the establishment, that of the heads of the household. During these trips he visited various tribes and arranged for opening future missions, when opportunity and particularly finances, would permit. The first mission-house now Sacred Heart Abbey soon assumed the dignity of a small monastery, recruits having been sent from Prance to assist in the work. About this period also, the Government granted him a postal con tract, so that he became postmaster of the surrounding country. The mail was carried on the back of an Indian pony a di...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

1 102 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. rent congregation. There are over four thousand now in the town, but it is only the minority who seek the protection of the Virgin Mother of Good Counsel. The first Mass was celebrated on Easter Sunday, 1886. The altar had been decorated for the occasion by Brother Dominic, to the best of his ability, and that meant excellent taste, even if the supplies were not abundant. A large lithograph of the Madonna of Good Counsel, which had been touched to the miraculous image at Genazzano, was placed above the altar, where it still remains. While serving in the pontifical army, Brother Dominic had often visited the Sanctuar' at Genaz zano, and it would seem as if it were no mere chance that he should have been the one to drive the first nail and do all the principal work, in connection with the opening of the first church in her honor humble though it be in these United States. They had Mass but once a month in the beginning, but for several years there has been a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 103 faithful clients, and saw the loving arms of Petruccia stretched forth to welcome her to a new sanctuary. Here, we see her dragged over rough roads, sur rounded by laborers, whose picks and shovels and loud tones make the only music heard, and truly it was not of heavenly origin. But even if the voices were loud, and the hands rough, Our Lady must have found a tender chord in their hearts, which responded to her love, since she followed their for tunes on tho road and is once more settled among them at the mines. ON EDUCATION. Education always was and always will be a potent factor in promoting the welfare of individuals and of na tions. From it as from a fountain flow the possibilities and the powers of all true greatness. It is the sole hope of the continued existence of our republic. It is tho sure safe-guard of our political freedom and the best promoter of peace within our borders. And happily in our day and country, it is a subject that intensely inter...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

104 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ' also assures us the favor and friend ship of God. In the words of Sacred Scripture, "Verily there is a reward for the virtuous." Learning is next to virtue, the most precious ornament and the highest im provement of the human mind. It is chiefly imparted in the school-room and during the halcyon days of youth. The memory is exceedingly improved by appropriate exercises and becomes a vast store-house of useful knowledge. The understanding, the light of the soul is greatly benefitted by the acqui sition of solid science. Judgment the most valuable of all the properties of the mind that by which the other faculties are poised, governed and directed is formed and perfected by experience and by regular and well digested studies and reflection. The true aim of education is there fore to develop these three great powers of the mind, and marshall them in the domain of virtue for the accomplish ment of good. How much the perfec tion of the mind depends upon educa t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 105 le Indian idVocate Is ft Quarterly Hevlow, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Tcr , to plead the cause of the last remnants of Indian tribes, and to give ti history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, Industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not bo found in any other publication. The proceeds of this IleWeu will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory THi: INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart P. O , Okla. Ter. Al'l'itONH) iiy KK.HT KfcV. TIIEO. MEnilSCHAKKT. Vicar Ai'ostomc of Oklahoma ani Indian Tfihutoii . A Quarterly Reviow, entered at the Sacred Heart I'oit Oihce in Oklahoma 'lerntorj, as t-ocond clas matter. Subscriptions HO Cents per Year. Slnile Copies lr Cents OCTORER, 1898. Editorials and Locals. Cool and coll...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

106 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Friends of the American Indians are said to be preparing for an expose of the conduct of the administration towards the wards of the nation. Men and women who have devoted years and large sums of money to work for the uplifting of the Indians, give it for their opinion that the scandalous doings of the Indian looting agents in the days of Grant, pale before the rank robbery which is going on to-day. Officers of the army, who have won the confidence of the Indians by highmindedness and good care of the interests of the chil dren of the plains, have been side tracked, to make a clear track for low types of blackleg politicians of the stripe that is so prominent in the exist ing administration. Pay no attention to slanderers and gossip-mongers. Keep straight on your course and let their backbiting die the death of neglect. "What is the use of lying awake at nights brooding over the remark of some false friend that runs through your brain like lightning? What is...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

THE INDIAN ADVNCATE. 107 child or save it from clanger. Her bencficiont influence is felt in all the clangers and exigencies of life, on the battlefield, in the storm at sea, by the young soldier lying wounded on the field, by the shipwrecked sailor, by the poor wanderer, an exile in foreign lands. If these have preserved their faith, if they believe in the immortality of the soul, their first cry is, " my God, my God, have pity on me and help me!" And immediately afterwards the thought takes shape. "Oh, if only my mother was here!" Alas! the unfortu nate's mother cannot hear that cry of anguish. She is far away, perhaps dead, that poor mother. But we Chris tians know a mother who never dies, who always listening, ever hears the voice of her children, from whatever quarter they appeal to her. Time, place and circumstances are all annihi lated by the omnipotence of the mater nal love of this best of all mothers, the mother given us by Jesus Himself when dying on the Hood. This Mother...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1898

108 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Remembering that one can not give what he has not and that there is a proportion between the effect and the cause we must come to the conclusion, that the maker of man must have been the master of nature; for otherwise how could he submit nature to man ? Again, if he be the master of nature he must be the Supreme Being, that is God, for a master does not admit of a superior. Can we call this a departure in reasoning ? To deny that God is the Creator of man is to belittle man below compari son To prove that there is no God, Ingersoll charges Him with cruelty. Hear his words: "There can be good ness without much intelligence but it seems to me that perfect intelligence and perfect goodness go together." We agree to this Mr. Ingersoll. "In nature I see, or seem to see good and evil, intelligence and ignorance, good ness and cruelty, care and carelesness, economy and waste. I see means that do not accomplish the ends designs that seem to fail. "Why I am an Agnos...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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