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Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 3,206 items from Anti-Slavery Bugle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 11 August 1848

THE ANTI-SLAVERY BUGLE f published every Friday, at Salem, Colum bian's Co., Ohio, by the Executive Commillee Of the WcsTKRN ATI-Sl.AVHT SoCIITVt end is the only paper in the Great West which advocates secession from pro-sluvery government and pro-slavery church organt zuious. It is edited by Uemj. S. and J. E i.izaikth Jonss; and while urging upon the people the duty of holding "No union with Slaveholders," either in Church or Slate, as the only consistent position an abolitionist can occupy, and as tin best means for the de struction of slavery ; it will, so fur as its lim its permit, give a history of the daily progress of the aifti-slavery cause exhibit tlio policy and practice of slaveholders, and by fuels and arguments endeavor to increase the zeal nnd activity of every true lover of Freedom. In addition to its anti-slavery matter, it will con tain general news, choice extracts, moral t lies, &e. It is to be hoped that all the friends of the Western Anti-Slavery Society al...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 11 August 1848

ump, when, in addition to this, ws heard the report of the men, that the food dealt out to them on the way home, consisted of 1 worrov bread Hnd tainted meat, when we learned that these volunteers, all destitute as they were, wrro marched through our ene my's country, landed at New Orleans, and thence sent up here, a disgusting exhibition, in a condition worse than that of convict, and fed with provisions which such never would beasked to touch, when these things were told to us, we were compelled to ask if such was the reward the Govermnenl of the United States be3towed upon thuir volunteer defenders. From the Christian Citizen. The Patriotic Volunteers. Last Wednesday atternoon, our citizens received the announcement hy telegraph that the remains of the Massachusetts regiment rtn their homeward journey from Mexico, had tiken pnssage In the cars of the Western Itiilroad at Springfield, and would pass through our city at shout four o'clock, on their way to Boston, where they were to...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 11 August 1848

Compromise Bill Defeated. The infamous compromise which was a dopteJ in the Semis by t tola of 31 to S3, the House had the manliness to lay on the table, 1 H ayes to 97 nays. Thus has this measure been, for the present, checked ; we wish wo could think that this wss its quie tusit is to be hoped It is, but when we re member how greet is Hie might of slavery, and that corrupt ad ministration having the disposition and power to bribe, is its willing tool, we fear that the resurrection and final passage of the bill will add another to the thousand instsncesof southern domination and northern servility. Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Geor gia, and Tennessee each furnished one repre sentative who voted aye, and Kentucky fur nished three; these were all Whigs, and were the only eight Iroin the south who op posed the compromise. New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New Jersey, Michigan, Iowa, and Wisconsin went unanimously against it. Of the Ohio delegatio...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 11 August 1848

POETRY. From the A. S. Standard. Leaving the Matter Open. A TALE. Two brothers once, an ill-matched pair, , Together dwell (no matter where,) Tj whom in I'ucle Sam, or some one, Mad left a house and farm in common: The two in principles nnd habits Were different as rait to rabbits ; Stout farmer North, with frugal care, Laid up provision for his heir, Not scorning with hard sun-brownod hands To scrape arquainlar.ee with his lands ; Whatever thing he had to do Ma did, and made it pay him, too; Me told bis waste stone by the pound, Mis drains made water-wheels spin round, Mis ice in summer-time be sold. Mis wood brought profit when 'twas cold, He dug and delved from morn till night, Strove to make pro lit square with light, Lived on his meant, cut no great dash, And paid bis debts in honest cash. On tolber band, bis brother South Lived very much from hand to mouth, l'layed gentleman, nursed dainty hands, Borrowed North's money on his lands, And culled his morals and bis graces From co...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 25 August 1848

THE ANTI-SLAVERY BUGLE. Is published every Friday, at Salem, Colum' Liana Co., (Mio.by ilie Executive Committee of the Western Anti-Slavkbv Sociitvi and is the only paper in the Great West which advocates accession from pro-slavery governments and pro-slavery church organi zations. It is edited by Demj. S. and j. E l.tlABTH Jonis; and while urging upon the people the duty of holding No union with Slaveholders," either in Church or State, as the only consistent position an abolitionist can occupy, and as the bent means for the de struction of slavery ; it will, so far as its lim its permit, give a history of the daily progress of the anti-slavery cause exhibit the policy and practice of slaveholders, and by facts and arguments endeavor to increase the seal and activity of every true lover of Freedom. In addition to its anti-slavery matter, it will con tain general news, choice extracts, moral t lies, &c. It is to be hoped that all the friends of the Western Anti-Slavery ."Society...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 25 August 1848

From the Liberator. The Abolitionists and the Free Soil Party. The day of prophesy has passed i that of ulfilmenl is come. For long years the abo litionists have been looking forward to the late 9 Jhings which is now beginning to de Voloprt iiaelf. They hiive always known (hat the effect of their labors would at Inst he seen in the disturbance of the political ele ments an I the reconstruction of die political parties. They have Seen and said, for long past, that there wrre no principles upon which partins could divide, at this day, in this coun try, excepting Slavery and Anti-Slavery, In point of fact, for near thirty years there has been but One party, thu Slavery party, which has governed the country through the factions springing from local or economi cal interests, into which the population of the country has, from time to lime, divided itself. The belter portion ol those factions, who sincerely believed that vital principles were wrapped up in their or ganizations, were slow i...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 25 August 1848

The Fair. Of ill is year, as we learn from tome of those who had il in charge, was well patronized in the way of donating, but not to much so in purchasing. Some of the towns which as sisted last year, did nothing this ; while, on the oilier hand, number which had not be fore given aid, sent In valuable contributions. Among them we may mention Rootstown and Massilon, which hnth gave handsome do nations 5 Cherry Valley, with its contribution in cheese, set a good example to other towns on the reserve ; and Michigan gave her token ofoheese. ' One reason perhaps why the sales wore less this year than last, may be found in the fact that the grove where the meeting was held, was at a considerable distance from the Fair room. Those who had the management of the Fair did the heat they could under the circumstances, and it was not their fault that more was not accomplished. A large amount of goods remain unsold, a portion of which will be exposed at Marlboro during the meet ings there, end ...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 25 August 1848

POETRY. The Artizan. BY WILLIAM D. GALLAGHER. The day i past : tlie quiet night Toward its midhour weareth on; Hii work-shop has been closed for hours A good day's labor dons. The toil is hard that brings him bread ; And sometimes scant supply: When drops awhile his manly head, And glistens his full eye. Yet from the trial shrinks he not, For he has youth and strength, and will : And though his toil is ill repaid Bends daily to it still, lie sometimes murmurs, but his pride Checks his expression nt its birth, That blessings to hi class denied Surround the drones of earth. Ilia calling sometimes takes him where Wealth, worth, grace, beauty, all unite; And lovely tones arrest his ear, And lovely looks his sight ; And much he thinks and half he sighs Yet ere his welcome work is done, Ho longs for home, and Mary's eyes, And for his prattling son. His labor hath been slight to-day ; And wife and child before him sleep ; And ha had paused the half-spent night In study close and deep. The ...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 1 September 1848

THE ANTI-SLAVERY BUGLE. Ja published every Friday, at Salem, Colum biana Co.,Uhio,by the Executive Committee of the Wistern Anti-Slavery Sociktvi and is the only paper in the Great Weil which advocates secession from pro-slavery government and pro-slavery church organi sations. It is edited by Bbnj. S. and I. R Mzabkth Joxss; and while urging upon the people the duty of holding No union with .Slaveholders," either in Church or State, as the only consistent position an abolitionist oan occupy, and as the best means for the de struction of slavery ; it will, so far as its lim its permit, give history of the daily progress of the anti-slavery cause exhibit the policy and practice of slaveholders, and by facts and arguments endeavor to increase the real and activity of every true lover of Freedom. In addition to its anti-slavery matter, it will con tain general news, choice extracts, moral t lies, fee. It is to be hoped that all the friends of the Western Anti-Slavery Society all the ad...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 1 September 1848

tion in Paris, in Switzerland, and in lltr-1 1 1 n, where the most revolting and malicious ' lin, where the most rcvollinir and malicious ' tf this deplorable class ore lamed into docilt- j It, made lovers of order and neatness, and made capable of performing many valuable Services. The future teacher of this school is ; now abroad preparing himself for his work. ! A lew years ago, Mr. I'.verett, the prrserit President of Harvard College, then Gover nor of the Commonwealth, spoke the deep eonoictiuns of Massichusetts people, whpn, in a public addrgssgcn education, he exhort ed the fathers and mothers of Massachusetts in. the following words: 'Save, 'said he, ' save, spare, stint, starve, do any thing hut steal,' lo educate your children. And Dr. Howe, the noblo-hearicd director of the insti tution for the Blind, lately uttered the deep est sentiments of our citizens, when in speak ing of our duties to the blind, the deaf, and the dumb, and the idiotic, he said : ' The ..: i. . - r i...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 1 September 1848

The Prisoners of the Pearl. The present aspect of the trial of these three men, prisoner to slavery, may thus be briefly stated. Dravton, who was first brought to trial, was convicted on two indict ments, and i motion made by bis counsel for a new trial has been decided against him. There yet remains 103 indictments on which he will not be tried during the present term of the court. Savrxs has had all the indict tnents found against him except, we be lieve, one or two tried by one jury, who acquitted him on the 41 Indictments charging him with larceny, and adjudged him guilty on the 74 charging him with the abduction of slaves. The penally for the latter is a fine not exceeding 9200 in each case, and costs. Eno l.isH.against whom the Attorney General could not procure a particle of evidence that even he could torture into a seeming justification of the boy's detention after having been confined in prison four months, and enduring such treatment as oppressors ever inflict upon those ...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 1 September 1848

POETRY. The Blind Boy and his Sister. BY MARY HOWITT. " Oh, brother, said fair Annie, To the blind boy it her fide; 'Would thou could 'el see the lunthine lie On hill end valley, and the sky Hun; like glonoui oanopy O'er ell things far and wide ! "Would thou oould'st eee the waters In many a distant glen ; The mountain flocks that graze around ; Nay, even this patch of atony ground, These crags, with silver lichen crowned, I would that thou could'st kon ! "Would thou could'st see my face.brolher, At well as 1 see thine I For always what I cannot sen It is but half a joy to me. Brntncr, I often weep for thee, Yet thou dost ne'er repine !" "And why should I repine, Annie 1" Said the blind boy, with a smile ; 'I ken the blue sky and the gray; The sunny and the misty day ; The moorland valley stretched away For many and many a mile ! "I ken the night and day, Annie, For all ye may believe; And often in my spirit lies A clear light as of mid-day skies ; And ependors on ray vision rise, L...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 8 September 1848

THE ANTI-SLAVERY BUGLE la published every Friday, at Salt, Co turn biana Co., Ohio, by Hie Executive Committee Anti-Slavery Socittvi and it ihe only paper in ' Oteit Wt which advocate! eeceaion from pro-slavery government and pro-slavery church organi- xations. It is edited by Dskj. S. and J. L- MitniTH Jo.vcj; and while urging upon the people the duty or holding ' No union with Slaveholders," either in Church or State, ts the only consistent position an abolitionist can occupy, and na the belt means for the de struction of slavery t it will, so far as its lim its permit, eive a hiatoryof the daily progress of the anti-slavery cause exhibit the policy and practice of slaveholders, and by facts and arguments endeavor to increase the zeal and ! activity of every true lover of Freedom. In ' addition to its anti-slavery matter, it will cort- ' uin (reneral nows, choice extracts, moral tiles, &. It is to be hoped Hint till the fnmiils of the Western Anti-Slavery Society all the advoc...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 8 September 1848

mouslv of opinion Hint Congress did possess the power in question i and lhat the then President, a man who was on the scene ot action when the Constitution was formed rncurring in that opinion, Approved the lull. The documents which attest these interest ing circumstances are before tlm country, ml every one will jnilp" for himself nt' tlvir claims to credence, considered in connection with what has heen said upon the subject by the survivor of the cabinet referred to. To bring the matter nearer to our own times, within a few days, upon the very heel of the recent discussions upon this point, a bill containing this restriction tlm very bill which hiis in part produced Ibis discussion has passed both branches cf the national legislature, and received llio constitutional approval of the present executive an ap proval which it was bis sworn duly to wiih hold, if he had not been satisfied that all llie provisions ot the bill wero in rnnlormily lo the constitution. I he present 1 residen...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 8 September 1848

llshed, not only in that District, but in the Htates nUo, in the latter through tlie agency of the Slate governments, to whom the Con stitution wisely leaves exclusive power in the mailer, anil tn thu former OV wongre.i". mav he mistaken, hut I think I see in the guarded language of the resolution, evidence of an apprehension, on the part of the Con- vention. that a difference in opinion, to some IxtZl at least, existed among i.s members, upon the point referred to, and of Hn enliglil- aned and truly patrioiic resolve, not to sulfer that circumstance, 11 11 rxisiru, . rifru the moral power of their unanimity on the great question which had brought them to gether." Yes, in common with other men of " re flecting and philanthropic minds," he hopes to see slavery abolished in tlio District some i lime but when! Hn is opposed to having ' it abolished there at present, and of course is lionnd in honor tn use his influence to pre vent it. We confess that in regard to aboli tion in the Dist...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 8 September 1848

POETRY. From the Democratic Review. Gone! BY J. G. WHITTER. 'Gone before To that unseen and silent shore, Shall we not meet as heretofore. Some summer morning!" Lamb. Another hand is beckoning us, Another call i given; And glows once more with Angle steps, The path which reaches Heaven. Our young and gentle friend whose smile, Made brighter summer hour", Amidst the frost of autumn time Has left us, with the (lowers. No palling of the cheek of bloom Forewarned us of decay ; No shadow from the Silent Land Fell round our sister's way. The light of her young life went down, As sinks behind the hill The glory of a setting star; Clear; suddenly and mill. As pure snd sweet her fair brow seemed, Kienial as the sky, And like the brook'slow song her voice, A sound which could not die. And half we deemed she needed not The changing of her sphere, To give to Heaven a Shining One, ho walked an Angel here. The blessing of her quiet life Fell on us like the dew; And good thoughts where her footste...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 15 September 1848

' 111 , 1 i-L ' THE ANTI-SLAV EKY BUGLE li published every Friday, at Salem, l)lum lima C.,Ohio,bj the Executive Committee or the Whtiiii) Anti-Slavery SocirTVt nd is the only paper in the Great West ,i.;..u ..i ... .uattion from tiro-slsverv government end pro-slavery church oigani cations. It ia edited by Bf hi. S. and J. E- mxabith JoNiij end while urging upon tne people the duty of holding ' No union with Slaveholders," either in Church or Stale, as the only consistent position an abolitionist can occupy, and as the bett means Tor the de struction of slavery I it will, so Tar as its lim its permit, give history of the daily progress of the anti-slavery cause exhibit the policy and practice of slaveholders, and by farts and arguments endeavor to increase the zeal and activity of every true lover of Freedom. In addition to its anti-slavery matter, il will con- tain fireneral nnwa. hniia pflnnli mnrnl tiles, &.C. It is to be hoped that nil the friends j 01 tne western Antt-Mave...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 15 September 1848

. cd little respect fur ihs " trnlitions of Hie fathers," but contented himself wilh preach ing peace, love, mi J purity, and with living ihem out in practice. His life has command rd the admiration of all who are Bcajnatiitfd with In history; his adherents were Ma imi tators they were the Chrntiant cf itio first onlury. Christian, 'lien, eiglileen hundred years agn, was an epithet applied to a (mall, despised, hated, proscribed class, remarkable fur ilic obloquy cast tipnn it, and for (lie for liiudu wuli which it sustained itself under Miter and bloody persecutions, inflicted on it imply brinusc it was too transcendemally excellent to be endured by those it rebuked. What does Christian mean now 1 It is th appellation of a large, respected, honor ed, privileged class, remarkable for claim , inj an ortlicdoxy of right, and lor anathema' tiling all who do not subscribe to its inter pretations and submit to its dictation. Was the term proper in its criminal application sit proprr now ...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 15 September 1848

Almost a Fix, if not quite. W have occasionally heard a person threa ten to knock another into the middle of next week ; and it might he infered from the aqual Iv looks of the political heaven thai there are thousands of politician who woul.i con- aider It ah Immense favor to he knocked into i the middle bf next Nnvembef.or in any other i have the time Intervening between thta and the presidential election summarily ilis- j posed ol. Ana especially i mi Taylor Whigs, who feel that their candidate is wbnt the Virginia slave said of his master " berry unsartain." . One of , the latest tan umtr with which old "Rough and Heady" has been seized, is his acceptance of the no mination of the Democratic Nullificrs. of South Carolina, who placed Butler upon the same ticket with him, thus manifesting their regard for the peculiar institution by combi ning in one the actual slaveholders upon iiom the Whig and Democratic tickets. I aylor ol course responded to the nomination Willi great cordiali...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Anti-slavery bugle. — 15 September 1848

POETRY. Sunshine. BY MARY HOWETT. 1 lore the sunshine everywhere, la wood, anil field, ind glen ; 1 lova il in the busy haunl Of town-imprisoned men. I love il when il streanieth in The humble cottage door, And casts the chequered casement shade Upon lb red-brick floor. I love it where the children lie Deep in the clovery grass, To watch amonj the twining roots The gold-jjiecn beetle pass. 1 1ve it on the breezy sea, To clance on sail and oar. While the great waves, like molten glass, thorite leaping to the shore. I love it on the mountain lops, Where lies the thnwless snow, And hair a kingdom hnthed in light, Lies stretching out below. And when it shines in forest glades Hidden, snd green, and cool, Through mossy boughs and veined leaves, How is it beautiful ! How beautiful on little streams When sun and shade nt play, Make silvery meshes, nliile the brook Goes singii'g on its way. How beautrTul w here dragon-flies Are wondrous to behold, With rainbow wings of gauzy pearl, And bodi...

Publication Title: Anti-Slavery Bugle
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Ohio, United States
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