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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 December 1897

WASHINQTON IN 1897. W. G. Gaunce in State Monthly, Feb- ruary, 1897. The present year bids fair to be a prosperous one for the state of Wash ington. Our mountain ranges will be explored for the precious minerals as never before. Surprising discoveries will be made, rich mines both east and west of the Cascades will be opened, and dividend payers discovered among those only recently uncovered. The Colville, Okanogan, Monte Cristo, Cascade, Meth ow, King county, Pierce county and oth er fields will be the scene of exploration, discovery and development. Our farm ers, encouraged by the bountiful yields of every year and the present improved prices for their product, encouraged by their lessening debt, and animated with the prospect of another mortgage-lifting crop, will increase acreage, improve methods and renew energy. The Walla Walla and Palouse sections will exhibit more wheat acreage than ever, and the valleys of the west slope will yield as never before. Spurred by the past year'...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 December 1897

12 The potato crop of the United States, as well as of Europe and the British Isles, is the lightest for years. Some statisticians have placed the world's Bhortage a 1 1,500,000,000 Dlishels. Ireland is so short of potatoes the English press predict great Buffering among that unfortunate people. The season was unfavorable —too wet in the early and too dry in the late part of the season. In Ohio the frequent showers'during the larvae stage of the first brood of bugs made the use of london purple and paris green of light effect. Many large growers were overrun with bugs, although they used their sprayers and' dusters frequently. The bugs alone in such cases were enough to destroy the crop. Where the crop escaped the bugs the blight appeared, and as that is extending further north each year and has invaded the fields in Michigan and Xew York the question of supply of healthy seed potatoes for 1898 is already exercising some of our most extensive growers. The opinion that potatoes from ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 December 1897

Dried Fruits—Apples, evaporated, 4(q 6i cents per pound; sun-dried, sacks or boxes, 'Ma -H cents; pears, sun and evaporated, 5@6 cents; plums, pities*, 3@4 cents: prunes, Italian, 4@6 cents; silver, extra choice, 6@7 cents per pound; figs, Smyrna, 1 \ui Hi cents; California, black, 5@6 cents; do white, 8i cents per pound. ( thickens, 8 cents alive; *'* -v" - Butter has advanced to 30 cents per pound at Portland. The Oregon Creamery Company, Portland, Or., is paying 27 1-2 cents for butter fat. Carstens Brothers are reciving this week a shipment of 12,000 pounds of turkeys from Yakima. A Portland buyer at Castle Rock last week bought 4,000 sacks of pota toes at 35 and 40 cents per bushel. The hop market in New York is firmer. From 13 to 14 cents is being paid in the Waterville district. Pacifies are quoted in New York City at 16(o>18 cents. James Tulloch, of East Sound, sent in a consignment of 180 boxes of apples that are well packed and as pretty as a picture. Oreas island, Mr. ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 December 1897

14 Eggs are always cash. They are ready for market the minute laid, and the sooner they are got to market the better. They require no cultivation, pruning or harvesting, but are at once in salable condition. With plenty of eggs on the farm, there are a host of good things in the kitchen and money in the family purse. Gathering up eggs is liking picking up dimes and dollars. Great is the hen that pro duces them. When everything is dull in winter, the egg basket has wonder fully helped out many a poor farmer. The crops may be poor, the provisions low, the family cow dry, with a long wait for the next growing season, but the hen comes up smiling, and is ready to get a pound of tea or a sack of flour. If treated well, she will respond as readily when the snow is on the ground is when the fields are green. She is a friend to the rich and poor alike. Martin Nelson, of Drillia, Wash., re ports good succet-8 with ensilage. His silo is 20x:.0 feet, built of matched lum ber and lined with tar...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 December 1897

ALDRIDGE, JOHNSON & CO. COMMISSION MERCHANTS Wholesale Dealers in Fruit., Hay Grn'n Beani, Pro duce. 1525 Pacific Aye. TACOMA, WASH. San Francisco offlce-121-123-125 Washington Street. p. O. BOX 2256 r^ — ~ ~~~J 4 CLIFFORD & POSTON > i General Commission and Brokerage > m > J Consignments SOLICITED.... > < 823-825 Railroad Aye. - ; - Bpokane, Wash. { SEATTLE PRODUCE C 0... I-D' SPENCER GENERAL COMMISSION DEALERS Hay Giain, Flour, Feed, Fruits, Poul try, Vegetables and all kinds of Farm Produce. Tel. Main 173. \. Foot Madlion »tr««t. Commercial Wharf, 8«»ttl«. W»H EAST LAKE POULTRY YARDS FOR SALE— One pen (4) Golden Bearded Polish, |5 00; One Pen (4) C. Indian Games, |5.Oo; One B. P. Rock Cock, t2.50; OneS Wyandot Cockerel, »2.00. ...Yards... Mks. C. C. Mathews, ' 1611 Federal Avenue P. O. Address 39 Hlnckley Block. Botel gdrtbolet MICHE S & TIMM, Prop, ; Moderate Rates. Free Sample Room. ; . NORTH YAKIMA One Block From Depot. ...WASH... COR ONE MONTH "'<...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 25 December 1897

THE MOST COMPLETE LINE OF SPRAY PUMPS ixx tlx© 3Mtetx*lsL©t. I r "JOtl \J^^m/fttßQ Imperial Nozzle. tJm/ i^H Bordeaux Nozzle. SENDF'OR J^ fiß !: mi OC/VL/ iKmJtX grk §L i! Jl|B| CATALOGUE' - 1111 BlHJw'ft'■ ■ t]B'''T« ifajp»TTiiC" ■ . ■ ¥ Vjl^^K'' IT i '111 Bean Hydraulic Pump. " Vermorel Nozzle. „ . Hop Nozzle. Myers Bucket and Barrel J I Pump. MITCHEIvIv, IvE^^^l^ <& CO. 808-810 First Avenue <Sovi.tlx, Seattle, Wash. FRANK J. MERZ 11 ALL KINDS OF DAIRY SUPPLIES W\ MM WBBB^^jt' IJtii DAIRY and CREAMERY SHIPPING" CANS. The Umpire Hand Power Separator Sfl^il ImlwhtSlf:' :ii I ill I ill The best proof of the good quality of my cans and supplies is that I HHHHHHHHHj B^^^KSiii'' ,: % 'fill II continue to receive the patronage of the largest creameries and Dairies in the i^^^^PPS^^S|^^^H cft^BliVv' m*'% ' I 'ii|i ffil ' guarantee my prices to be the lowest consistent with good quality. HOI liffiHHH'KlP' L^4sl Agents for the EMPIRE HAND POWER SEPARATOR, easiest to 912 JP^ Catalo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

RANCH AND RANGE ISSUED EVERY WEEK Vol. 3, No. 39. SEATTLE and SPOKANE, WASH., JANUARY 1, 1898. $1.00 Per Year. LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST OF Agricultural Implements __ :„..'.... . ;;i_j_ ! / . ~ ~ ' ■ ■■ ■ ■ ■ -■ ■ Embracing the most popular approved lines Everything that ■■ ■ - ■ . '■■■ '' -.■ ■ ■ - . . ; _j\ __ ; ' .-' . ■ • A FARMER NEEDS ■ * " ' * ' ■ -■ - - i Hi hi. ,'.■! "11V - " ' ' " ' - ." - ' , .' . t WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THIS (ffllPft WW\k ' I -BABY" de LAVAL hand sepaba- ff! ■£* Trnnrrwp Vrmr IVliripC TORS. CAPACITIES INCREASED A&gr Bialjfo J 1111|J1UYC/ lUUI L/cllllCo. ll\ BL FARM BUTTER UNSALABLE That this is a positive Make them cheaper than ever before -•' JL ■■ "^ Elan fact I to° well known- ~The storekeepers all over the * ' /Ck ■ B^^^*, -J-lV— country are now actually obliged to turn down FARM _ . ;"1 _ ':■■"*' '"_. . , , , ' "' . VI ■ K^i^P^-JVlimWk BUTTER because there is no market for it. It does not Baby No. 3—Guaranteed 675 pounds per hou...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

2 | Perhaps § & Years ago good Baking Powder J $ could not be bought for 25 cents $ & per pound. Conditions have * changed. $ t CRESCENT | % Baking Powder at 25 cents is as $ * pure, goes as far, gets to work # \ as quick as any higher priced $ | powder. Try it. Get your money # & back if you want it. & & , Crescent Manuf'g Co. fc %»**&«#»*%%»»sss%&%s&**&& » if Tie Calvert Cornpapy... WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 716 FIRST AYE. Booksellers and Stationers Seattle, Wash. PRINTERS AND BINDERS W. H. ADAMS & CO. ---" F Solicit Consignments of FRUITS, VEGETABLES, FARM PRODUCE And refer you to the following leading growers: Hon. D. E. Lesh, North Yakima; Purdy J. Flint, North Yakima; E. S. Ridge, Puyallup. ! A. GOLD X>Or*l*Aßi> r Tigg~ —TMfc m .In about the actual worth of / < llmiMii 1 iVifißgrgSffl""" new book on Incubation . > 1' MT gte*"*Ma IP"ffl^nr J Poultry. Contains a full) i I €s§33£is&--^^Hr and complete description or l, 1 t?*3...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

RANCH AND R Vol. 3, No. 39. Northwest Fruit Growers Convention. January 11 to 15. We beg to inform you that the transportation companies, with the usual courtesies extended this association, have made the rates on the Northern Pacific, Great Northern and Union Pacific one and one-fifth fare and on the Southern Pacific one and one-third fare for the round trip. The apparent difference of rates is caused by the Southern Pacific s lower tariff rate, it being only four cents a mile, against five cents a mile on the They" have also expressed a willingness to transport all legitimate ex hibits of fruit, either fresh, evaporated or canned; trees, etc., free of charge. Such exhibits should be carefully packed and shipped to Buell Lamberson, 180 Front street, Portland, Oregon, on or before January 5, 1898. Honing you can make it convenient to be present, we are, cordially s P 8 J HENRY E. DOSCH, Secretary Executive Committee. After the discussion of the subject of growing alfalfa, in the iss...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

4 Our Perpetual Experience Meeting. How Much Seed Per Acre. In our issue of December 11 we had I well-written article on this sub ject by L. N. Bonham, of Ohio, supplemented by additional remarks from the pen of W. J. Spillman. Below we give another contribution from one of Whitman county's progressive farmers: "Regarding the question of how much seed wheat to sow per acre, let me statG*"tliat it makw considerable difference as to the time of year it is sown. My experience and observation is that if it is sown very early m the fall, so'that it gets a good root before cold weather, or if sown very late in the fall, so that the grain will not even sprout until spring, or if not put in until spring, one bushel is sufficient. But if put in in the fall early enough to Sprout and yet not early enough to get a good root before the ground freezes, it is hardly enough, for it generally freezes out more or less. Or if it is sown very late in the spring, so it doesn't have tune to stool out, f...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

factoring an egg in twenty-four hours, must have her food in a soluble form." "How often do you clean your houses?" "Once in one or two weeks, depending somewhat upon circumstances. The manure is generally spread upon the fruit ground as it is taken from *<the house. We find that this suits us very well. When piled by itself, the ammonia is likely to escape from it." "Have you found that winter eggs, as a rule, are fertile?" "No, we have been unable to obtain good hatches from our winter eggs, even when the hens wore mated and fed with the greatest care. We cannot hope to obtain good hatches of vigorous stock until the hens are able to run out and exercise. The Southern breeders, of course, are able to obtain fer tile eggs at almost any time, as their hens run out almost constantly, and thus obtain all the exorcise they need." "What proportion of your Leghorn hens become broody?" "That depends largely upon their age. The older the Leghorn, the more often she wants to set. Our pul...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

6 BROWN BAKES BAKER. Eeplying to the statements of State Horticultural Commissioner Baker, the insect inspector of King county, W. H. Brown, says: "Have read Mr. J. E. Baker's version of the infected Japanese orange controversy, wherein he states that said fruit is infected with insects which belong to citrous fruit. If I get a true conception of his meaning, they are insects that infest certain kinds of fruits which can only be grown in a tropi cal or semi-tropical climate, and can be of no possible injury in this climate. "In justice to myself I wish to state that this was in no way the question that Mr. Baker was called on to decide. He conceded them to be all that I claimed them to be (pernicious), from the fact of his ordering them fumi gated. I claimed that the only method by which they could be extermi nated was to open the boxes, take all the wrappers off and fumigate them with crude sulphur in an air-tight room. At this Mr. Baker demurred, claiming that it was not necessary...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

BETTER THAN COLLEGE. Our life-time subscriber, T. E. Conrad, of Tippecanoe county—long may he survive! —in his letter in another column says that he "considers a year's subscription as better, as it is a great deal cheaper, than a term in any agricultural college, for the average farmer." He is undoubtedly cor rect. He speaks for the average farmer, it must be kept in mind, not for the few who have the ambition and the means to fit themselves for super intending and managing bonanza farming enterprises. Such men, as he no doubt will admit, should spend not one term only, but take a full course at some well-equipped agricultural college. It wouid be of great advantage certainly to any farmer, if time and means permitted, to spend three months jit the agricultural school, for he could-in that short time learn many of the principles of the science to which his life is devoted, and all his future reading and observation in agricultural matters would be made the more practical and useful...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

I Ranch and Range. ISSUED EVERY SATUHfiAY, In the interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists and Stockmeu of Washington, Oregon, Idaho Montana, Utah and British Columbia. Absorbed the " Washington State Monthly." Official organ of the Northwest Fruit Growers' Association, embracing Washington, Oregon Idaho and British Columbia. PUBLISHED BY THE RANCH AND RANGE COMPANY EDITORIAL OFFICES - - SEATTLE, WASH BUSINESS OFFICES : Seattle, , - - 315 316 Pioneer Block Spokane, . Suite F Hypotheek Bank Bldg Subscription (In advance) ------------ $1.00 per year Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-316 Pioneer block, Seattle, Wash. A poultry journal is to appear at Spokane shortly. H. W. DesGranges, of the Kockford Enterprise, is to be the editor. "It is a fortunate fact," remarked the student of local phenomena, "that Hope will work for lower wages than either Joy or Sorrow." James Gleed, a successful farmer of the Natchez valley, writes that he is operating a Cooley creamer. He in...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

t CROWN GREEN BONE CUTTER CAPACITY 20 POUNDS PER HOUR PRICE $7.50 NU. 0 DDI7C rttu Mil I if!!: NU. 0 "Kill rttU IYIILL tWt For Grinding all Kinds of Grain. • If jJlK]^ Write for Circular or Catalogue . m , ' We aim to carry in stock all kinds of Tools arid Machinery WJ^^^m!^^ used on the farm. /3S323==Sffi^^^*^ Call and inspect our goods and prices.when in the city. New quarters in STONE BLOCK, J^^^^l^MmoS^^ opposite Northern Pacific Passenger Depot. go. ™%TT%r™m™"- POLSON-WILTON HARDWARE 60. wSSm£w«liKi™r iL LASSOINGS. The James creamery in North Yakima paid $500 to its patrons for the month. Thomas Fear, a prominent dairyman of Cowichee, will attend the dairy, school at Pullman. Montana farmers ought to produce every egg consumed in the state, but instead of this the state is shipping train loads of eggs from the Dakotas, Ttah, Oregon and Washington.—Montana Husbandman. The Chehalis Bee says: Arthur Browning picked a fresh new bunch of ripe raspberries in his yard last week. It's ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

lo No one is more concerned in what constitutes the essential qualities of a good beef animal than the man who breeds and feedfl for the block; for it iniiist be kept in mind that this is the ultimate end of all beef stock, and the best beef animal is one that carries to the block the highest excellence and Uie most profit. This, in a word, is the key-note of the whole problem, and \l we do nothing more than look squarely at this subject in the right light we will have made a good beginning. It means everything in the live stock business to begin right, to be traveling upward—headed in the right way. To be headed the opposite way is fatal. There is a well-defined beef type that admits of less flexibility than is generally appreciated. We hear much about the dairy type, and there is a dairy type, fairly clean-cut and well defined; but there is also a beef type, more rigid and Jess variable. All know there are not a few cows of quite pos itive beef tendencies capable of making very cr...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

DAIRY LEGISLATION. Address Delivered by Hon. E. A. McDonald, at the Fifth Annual Session of the Washington State Dairymen's Association. Legislation is as old as civilization because a state of civilization could not exist without the consent of the majority to well defined laws which should govern them. Law has for its object the discovery of the necessary relations of man to man in order that laws may be enacted which will allow the greatest freedom of individual rights not in conflict with the rights of the many. Laws are di vided into Natural Law and Positive Law. Dr. Lorimer in his "Institutes of Law" defines Natural Law as the rule of absolute rectitude in so far as discoverable by man. It is the per manent element in Positive Law. We may honestly fail to realize the law ot nature in its relation to man, but that is no evidence that the law does not exist. Apples fell to the ground be fore we understood the law of gravita tion. Positive law may be regarded as either a science ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

12 You might draw the conclusion from what I have stated that I am a pessi mist. lam neither a pessimist nor in optimist. 'I do not wish the artist to make the photograph more beautiful than the original, neither do I want all the lines which nature has drawn to be removed, nor all the scars waich wrecklessness has caused to mar we features to be covered up with paint. Let us look at legislation as we hnu it, not as we wish it was, and the rem edy will be more quickly applied. Needed legislation is a broad subject and I can only discuss it in a general way, for the candle of my life and yours will have burned out and there will be need for legislation. My subject, as I understand it, should have read: "Needed Legislation to Foster and Protect Farmers from Adul terated Products." The first question which my subject suggests is: Are the farmers entitled to legislation to pro tect and foster their line of industry? We can answer this question by refer ring to the procedings of the Stat...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

leaves a loophole for fraud, and should be investigated and some law passed regulating the same. In conclusion, I believe there should be a pm'e food law, or we may have a similar experience to that of California. It is unjust to all manufacturers to build up a trade on a certain line of goods until their business reaches large proportions an dthen at one sweep pass a law which practically prohibits its sale and bankrupts the manufacturer It is a much wiser policy, when our state is young and almost free from adulterations, to pass laws whioh will build up industries the products of which will increase not only the pros perity but the health of the state and be a standing advertisement wherever consumed. This work must be done by the farmers, if done at all, because they are the class that suffer most from adulterated foods. The condition of the finances of our state is improving, so that such a law would not be burdensome. I have made a number of suggestions which will, I hope, lea...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 1 January 1898

«4 Eggs are always cash. They are ready for market the minute laid, and the sooner they are got to market the better. They require no cultivation, pruning or harvesting, but are at once in salable condition. With plenty of eggs on the farm, there are a host of good things in the kitchen and money in the family purse. Gathering up eggs is liking picking up dimes and dollars. Great is the hen that pro duces them. When everything is dull in winter, the egg basket has wonder fully helped out many a poor farmer. The crops may be poor, the provisions low, the family cow dry, with a long wait for the next growing season, but the hen comes up smiling, and is ready to get a pound of tea or a sack of flour. If treated well, she will respond as readily when the snow is on the ground is when the fields are green. She is a friend to the rich and poor alike. Martin Nelson, of Orillia, Wash., re ports good success with ensilage. His silo is 20x20 feet, built of matched lum ber and lined with tarre...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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