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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

THE RANCH . : ,Ms:i?f V'::'M^ffi|::'A'& .•'.'" •v'/V.','^; VOL. XXI. NO. 6. A MATTER OF ROAD IMPROVEMENT There are pending before Con&ress today two bills that, as soon as they are enacted into law, will add thou sands of dollars to the value of lands in this state and make it possible in the course of a little time for every rancher to double the load he takeS to market. Reference is made to the Latimer bill before the United States Senate and the Brownlow bill before the House. These bills are substan tially identical, and have for their aim the improving of the public highways throughout the whole country. How 1 soon either or both bills may become laws no one can tell, but until they are passed it is the duty of every lover of good roads to do all he can to hasten their passage. These are the bills that have been agreed upon by the Congress of Good Roads' Associa tion, held at Washington, D. 0., the latter part of January last. The pro visions of the Brownlow bill were "...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

2 School of Experience This department is by and for the sub scribers of The Ranch. Contributions of not over 300 wards are asked of all who have anything valuable and of practical utility to relate. No definite subject Is named, but It is desired that what Is written for this de partment be pertinent to farming conditions in the Northwest. All are at liberty to write and no restriction is placed on the number of articles you send in. For each accepted article credit will be given on our books for 30 cents, to be taken out in either subscription or advertising. Write on one Bide of the paper only, and always give your full name and address, though not neces sarily for publication If not desired by the Teaching a Young Calf to Drink. — Pour fresh milk in the pail to the depth of about one-half inch. Gently place the calf's nose in the milk and against the bottom of the pail. It will soon get a taste of the milk and will begin to sip and suck on the bottom of the pail. When the milk i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

THE RANCH With which is consolidated Thr Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. PHIL. L. AXLINO, ----- Editob Associate Editors: F. Walden. H. L. Blanchard. MILLER FREEMAN - - Publisher Seattle, Wash. Editorial Offices: Tel. Main 1265—Long Distance Connection. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle, - - Third Floor Downs Building. Spokane, Alexander & Co., 521 First Aye. Subscription (in advance), one year, 50 cts.; six months, 30 cts. If on time, sub scription will be one dollar. Seattle sub scribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and sala ries paid. Tbe paper Is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot fin...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

4 Horticultural Notes By F. WALDEN. | Certain questions will come up from time to time to be settled by our hor- ticulturalists. Sometimes when they are settled, or seem to be, they will not stay settled. The Missouri Horti cultural Society has been wrestling with the question whether the Gano and the Black Ben Davis are two dis tinct apples. After the mountain la bored the mouse came forth, and it was settled that they are one and the same apple. But the Arkansas Horti cultural Society was not satisfied and they labored with the question. The mountain again brought forth a mouse, but on its sides could be plainly read: "The Gano and the Black Ben Davis are two distinct apples and the colored Ben is the better of the two." So now you have it. If you happen to be in Arkansas you must say "the Black Ben Davis and the Gano," but if in Missouri, "the Black Ben Davis, which is the Gano." The Arkansas society seems to have the vest of the argu ment, for there is where the Black Ben origin...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

gi to take hold. I asked him what is the cause of this disease, if it is not a fungous growth. He said it comes from the soil. I asked him how he knows that to be so, and he gave me his authority. I told him frankly that his authority is not worth much with me. Prof. Lawrence, or Pullman Col lege, claims, as 1 understand him, to have satisfactorily demonstrated thai the spores from the black spot canker ffll 1. produce the same disease on a. healthy tree. When his bulletin is out the reader can see how he handles that subject. I have not introduced this subject at this time in order to discuss it. But I wish to say this, that any one who thinks that the black spot canker is not a fungous growth can have the use of the columns of this paper to show a different origin if he can do so. While I do not be lieve that this disease comes from the soil, yet I am willing to have any one show that it does, if he can. Free and open discussion is what brings the truth to the front. If those who ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

6 THE CREAMERY OPERATOR'S SIDE Editor The Ranch: The writer notes on the first page of your issue of March 1 an article in reference to the creamery interests of Seattle. It might not be amiss to give the readers of your valuable paper some informa tion in regard to the future of the dairy industry in western Washing ton. The writer is not sanguine by any means as to the future of the creamery industry in western "Wash ington unless the creameries can se cure considerable more cream at lower rates. In the east the large cream eries pay on a basis of Elgin or New York market, as it may suit their shipping interests. In any event, they do not pay any overrun, which is most certainly correct, as the overrun con sists primarily of water and salt, is not the product of the farmer at all. They invariably pay at least 2 to 4 cents under the market for butter fat. In most instances they secure a much better grade of cream than we do in the west, as the farmers take ko much better care of th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

all mistakes will be corrected. Each and eevry one of my patrons .is in vited to call, look through the cream ery and inform himself as to my meth ods of doing business. I test twice a month, and patrons are always wel come at testing time, which is the 15th and last of each month. My methods are founded on business prin ciples, and I aim to deal honestly and fairly with all." Large or Small Dairy Cows. (Malcolm H. Gardner.) No act of congress has been of greater advantage to the farmer than the act establishing and aiding the state experiment stations; and no special work done by these stations has been of greater importance than that done in the interest of the dairy farmer. It is loss costly to learn at another's expense than at one's own; and by giving heed to the disinter ested, non-partizan work done by the stations, the dairy farmer may save himself much disappointment, and not be misled by following the false teach ings of uninformed writers. As a most valuable work in this ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

8 WALKS AND TALKS ON WESTERN AVENUE. BY F. WALDEN. The markets of Seattle are in a healthy condition. Potatoes have gone up and are worth from $22 to $24 per ton. Some claim that this advance in spuds is owing to the unfavorable weather and the bad roads east of the Cascades. Others doubt this and say the demand in the east is the prime factor in the high price of potatoes. No one need be greatly surprised if po tatoes slump somewhat when the farm ers put all their pitted stock on the market. But it is not believed that this slump will be great nor will it last long. The man who has good, merchantable Burbanks is strictly in it this year. One year with another a man who can raise good potatoes will make at least fair money. Onions are stronger, that is, the price is. They are always strong enough in the other sense. They range in price from 2 cents to 3 cents per pound. Eggs are falling in price. The hens are not on a strike. Apples advanced somewhat on Che supply being limited, but...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

The Field and Garden Vetch Good for Bench Land. The interest in the vetches as a forage crop is growing among the ranchers of the state. Inquiry fre quently reaches the publishers of The Ranch for details as to its cultiva tion, harvesting, feeding value, etc. In the last issue of this publication there was a valuable article on the subject by H. L. Blanchard. Since its publication there came to the office inquiries from G. M. Van Atta, a valued subscriber at Loomis, regarding vetch es. He wrote under date of February 24th, and said: "Permit me say your paper is great ly appreciated in this section. As you stated in your letter that you would write some more in regard to vetch, pardon my offering some suggestions in regard to what we would like to know about it in this section. We are very ignorant in regard to it, as it has not been introduced here at all, and if it will produce more bulk of feed (hay) per acre on bench land than the ordinary grains, it is what we need and want. Pl...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

10 Poultry Interests I BY H. L. BLANCHARD. I Thoroughbred Poultry on the Farm. I have often wondered why so little attention is paid by farmers to the quality of poultry which they "Keep, says M. M. Offutt. There are many reasons why pure bred poultry should be kept on the farm, or to say the least, why the mongrel flock should be improved by the use of pure bred males. It is conceded by those who have given the matter a trial that pure bred or even good grade stock of any kind will respond much more readily to feed and put on flesh at much less cost per pound than will the ordinary scrub, and the writer believes this to be equally true with poultry. Anyone who will give the matter a trial will be convinced that pure bred Plymouth Rocks or Wyandottes will grow faster, mature earlier and give a better account for feed consumed, both in meat and eggs, than the com mon dunghill. On the other hand, there is nothing in the domestic fowl creation that will as surely catch a butterfly on t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

back in waiting until they have pro vided themselves with a new .suit of clothes. Just feed them as you would any other young healthy animal which you wanted to maintain in a thrifty condition, and give them comfortable quarters in which to do the work ex pected of them, and they will not dis appoint you. This is assuming that they were early hatched and are of laying age. We have a private opinion that everybody who wauls to obtain the best possible results in the way of winter eggs should keep pullets, and nothing but pullets, but it is a matter of particular importance to beginners. To Tell the Age of Eggs. Incubator people may be interested in a report that comes from Saxony of an efficient apparatus for telling to a day the age of an egg. The machine is constructed upon the principle that the air space at the larger end of the egg increases in size with the age of the egg. When the egg is placed in liquid it has consequently an increas ing tendency to become vertical, with the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

12 U. S. Reclamation Work. (C. J. Blanchard, U. S. G. S.) On June 17, 1902, President. Roose velt signed the bill setting aside the proceeds from the disposal of public lands in the thirteen western states and three territories. The fund thus created can be used for the survey, examination and construction of works for the reclamation of arid land. The amount in the treasury is now estimated to be about $15,000,000. This is to be expended by the secre tary of the interior, and upon him is placed the entire responsibility of ini tiating and carrying forward the great work of reclaiming the arid lands and making possible their settlement. The law is very general in its terms, and much is left to executive discre tion, so that, with good administra tion, great results should follow. Cer tain important safeguards are provid ed by which the settlement in small tracts will be insured, and the refund ing to the treasury of the amount of the investment, so that the money can be used over an...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

they suddenly get "that tired feeling," and the stump is allowed to remain, for years, perhaps. The only way to clear the land of stumps is to do it. Machines are good, but every one is not in posi tion to have one for pulling his stumps. Then why not try the plan of co-opera tion in this direction as in a multitude of others? A number of ranchers in one section could club together, pur chase the machine that seems to have the greatest merit and help each other pull the stumps in the entire section. This, in our opinion, would speedily dispose of the stumps in that section and make the land more valuable in crop-producing properties and in market value. Every thinking rancher in the west ern part of the state knows that stump land is among the very richest in the state, unless it is so located that it is full of clay or other undesirable in gredients. Tn most sections where the lay of the land is not too much broken there is a thick layer of peat where the tall trees have stood for ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

14 Livestock Industry A New Live Stock Feature. The Ranch has just completed ar rangements for having a regular col umn devoted to the advertising of stock brands, and the new department will start with the issue for April 1. Each stock owner paying a dollar will have his brands advertised one time and have his name placed on the subscription list for a year, as well as having his brand pub lished in a state brand book. Addi tional insertions of the brand will be made at a nominal charge. The issue for April 1 will also commence a feat ure that should prove of value to the range interests —a department dealing with livestock interests as they are in the state. E. F. Benson, one of the most prominent stockmen, is inter ested in the feature, and would be glad to have all stockmen write him at Prosser, if they wish their brands advertised. It is important that the live stock industry of the state be more extensively advertised. As the April 1 issue of The Ranch will go to every stockma...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

weedy, keep cultivated until the plants touch in the rows. It is fit to feed Ufter a frost, or at any time, if you cut it before the frost, but not to be fed by turning stock into the pasture. You can get much more milk frcm an acre of kale than you can from an acre of corn. All kinds of stock will eat it, cattle, horses, sheep, hogs, etc. It will grow on any land if well drained, hill land preferred. This is for thousand-head ed kale, so as not to be confounded with "Jersey walking stick 'kale." By raising the plants in the seed bed, the ground can be plowed two or three times bofore planting, thus destroying the weeds. Why Dairying Maintains Fertility. Professor Curtiss, at the recent dairy covention at Cedar Rapids, la., told why dairying maintains the fertility of "the farm. He said: "In selling $1,000 worth of wheat from an lowa farm at present prices we sell with it about ?350 worth of fertility. In selling $1,000 worth of corn we sell about $250 worth of fertility—or con stit...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 March 1904

16 €k Make Life Easy 'fi^Wl:'li Does the Tubular, while the "other kind" of Cream Separators keep their users "chained to the gal m^^^m^St %M cvs ' *°r have the old pattern heavy bucket bowl, filled with all kinds of contraptions, such as "pie plates," "horse radish grates," "sieves," etc., so difficult to thoroughly cleanse. If any of your ikajjlfcSr^ neighbors have any such machines, call around and take a careful look at their "lay-out," and ask the ■fcl^T^^ good wife how she likes the job of washing- and scouring all these parts twice a day. Perhaps she illW nas een c^r^ven t0 tne extremity of washing them only once a day. If so, we do not blame her, although we would not care to recommend the quality of cream which has been run through an unwashed sepa ||| !». ~^Tt rator bowl, thus giving it that well-known "discy" flavor, so common in that type of bowl. There is %3£m "Tubular" Only One Inside Bowl Part D = N Hc E E! about as small and smooth as the bowl of a wine-glass. Anothe...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

THE RANCH . VOL. XXI. NO. 7. FRUIT PROSPECTS OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON Information has been secured from the fruit inspectors of most of the counties in the state as to the present condition of the orchards, both in regard to insect pests and the trees themselves. The inspectors were also asked to state the acreage already in fruit and what would probably be add ed by the end of the present season. On the whole, the replies indicate a most pleasing outlook for the fruit in dustry, but it is to be regretted that the growers are not giving better at tention to the matter of spraying. Pests are reported quite numerous, and some inspectors report that the horti cultural law is being disregarded. The report from each county is given be low. For some reason a number of the inspectors failed to make any re ply whatever, which we much regret.' King. We could not give any figures that would be any better than guess-work as to the acreage planted to fruit in SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, APRIL 1, 190...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

2 School of Experience This department Is by and for the sub scribers of The Ranch. Contributions of not over 300 wards are asked of all who have anything valuable and of practical utility to relate. No definite subject Is named, but it is desired that what Is written for this de partment be pertinent to farming conditions In the Northwest. All are at liberty to write and no restriction is placed on the number of articles you send In. For each accepted article credit will be given on our books for 30 cents, to be taken out In either subscription or advertising. Write on one side of the paper only, and always give your full name and address, though not neces sarily for publication if not desired by the correspondent. A Cheap Hot-bed— We went to a liv ery barn where grain was fed to the horses and got three loads of fresh manure, with considerable bedding in it. This was piled in a sunny place, sheltered from the northwest winds. When it began to heat, which was in about three days, i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

THE RANCH With which is consolidated Ttw Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. PHIL. L. AXLINO. Hditob Associate Editors: F. Waldbn. H. L. Blanchabd. MILLER FREEMAN - - Publishes Seattle, Wash. Editorial Offices: Tel. Main 1265 —Long Distance Connection. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle - - Third Floor Downs Building. Spokane, Alexander & Co., 621 First Aye. Subscription (in advance), one year, 50 cts.; six months, 30 cts. If on time, sub scription will be one dollar. Seattle sub scribers are required to pay $1 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscriptions. Good commission and sala ries paid. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue Is received from the subscriber. We must be notified In writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as w^ cannot find It o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 April 1904

4 Horticultural Notes I By F. WALDEN. , The writer was recently in the Yaki ma valley and made an examination as to the condition of the fruit trees in that section. The winter has damaged nothing in the fruit line so far as I could see. This is what might be ex pected, for there has been no coM weather, the coldest in that valley being ten above zero. The winter has been mild all over the state and as a result the fruit buds on all kinds of fruit trees are in prime condition. The most tender kinds are no excep tion. I examined many peach buds and never found one dead. The same is true of apricots and nectarnes. We yet have to run the gauntlet of the spring frosts and no one can predict what that may be. In some sections the frosts wipe out the entire fruit crop in certain years, while in the same sections the crop will wholly es cape, or be only partially killed, other years. Then there are some sections, especia'ly those on high points with ample frost drainage, where there is imm...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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