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Elephind.com contains 313 items from Free-Lance, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 9 September 1905

11l n VW k| I I PfeJl ■ B r y^g Lies in Lay Sermons are illogical. We don’t like them. We lay down our hand when it comes to this sort of newspaper stunt. We read a Lay Sermon in the Public Ledger (private) last Saturday that laid us out completely. In that lay sermon we are told of an escaped lion, raging rampant in his newfound freedom, being caught by an old negro uncle who mistook him for a Newfoundland dog. Uncle Eben—or whatever was his name, tier a rope around the neck of the king of beasts, and was found by the armed hunting party who had set out for the recapture leading him gently along the public highway. We refuse to believe it, and it is up to the Ledger to furnish more confirmatory corroborative detail in support of this astounding story. The Virginian-Pilot’s Lay Sermons are more conservative and contain no such thrilling episodes. Cannot refrain from expressing our admiration at a passage from a Norfolk Dispatch aditorial. Speaking of the political situation it says ...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 9 September 1905

THE MUSIC OF HUMAN HEARTS. 7 Clear through the troubled ages, Ever in time and place. Breaks at the portals of Heaven Tlie hymn of our human race. Music of manifold passion. Of forum, of field, of art: Born of the human striving Beep in the human heart. The song of the sonl in the silence; Tlie dirge of the heart in its doubt; The plaint of tlie spirit imprisoned. And the paens of tlie angels without. Down through tlie troubled ages —Holy, and clear, and sublime,— Tlie music of human passion Breaks on the shores of Time. Music* of minor cadences. Music that prompts to tears; Music that sanctifies pity Through all the perilous years. Fervid, pulsating, pervading. Responsive to heaven within. Out of tlie human frailty. Its joy, its despair, and its sin. Music that melts into memories, Giving a soul to the past. Swinging tlie portals of reverie's Beautiful temple and vast. Music that is to the spirit As the founts to the fainting halt — Wells from the secret springs of God Deep in tlie...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 9 September 1905

In the drama’s Heaftti* By Phil Space. A good second-class dramatist being present at the Academy of Music last Monday night and witnessing the production of “A Bunch of Keys” would have wrung his hands in holy horror at the aggregation that palmed themselves off as actors and actresses. ‘‘A Bunch of Keys” should have long ago been consigned to the theatrical graveyard where lie the remains of other dramatic abortions, but for foistering such a crowd of hamfatters on the public the trust is deserving of a thousand years in jail. It is indeed a far cry from “Julius Caesar” to “A Bunch of Keys” and from “Parsifal” to “Human Hearts,” but raen’t we in the grip of the merciless trust which is going to have its own way until there comes into the field the opposition that a long-suffering theatre-going public earnestly hopes for? Year after year there comes from the offices of the trust the typewritten advance notices which describe in glowing terms the attraction that is booked for the tr...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 9 September 1905

8 that it is owing to the Norfolk Cold Storage and Ice Company that the price of ice has been kept at the low figure which has prevailed here for the past two seasons. The output of his concern has been sold at fair living prices only, in addition to which Mr. Fentress has supplied free ice to all charitable institutions in this city and at Virginia Beach, There is more virtue in these things than are apparent on the surface, because the public, always vehement in its objections to extortion, are prone to be indifferent to the cause which keeps down extortion unless their attention is called to it. It is said that Mr. Fentress has not abandoned his idea of an independent heat, light and cold storage enterprise for this field, and it is generally hoped that an enterprising City Council of the future will grant him a franchise if he again comes forward. THOSE EXAMINATION'S. Next Tuesday the Police Board will examine applicants for positions on the force. The applicants must have a kno...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 16 September 1905

Vol. I. No. 26. WHO IS MHYOR OF NORFOLK ? By the biggest majority ever given a political candidate in this city, Dr. James G. Riddick was elected mayor of Norfolk. He is a gentleman who, for more reasons than one, commands the esteem and respect of all classes of people, regardless of political affiliation. As mayor of the city his voice should sound clear above the noise and small contentions of those beneath him, but those who have watched the trend of affairs observe with some surprise that the chief executive is frequently successfully thwarted in matters upon which his decision should be final. In no branch of the local municipal administration is this condition more apparent than in the police board. It is rather a peculiar state of affairs that a board appointed by the councils to manage the police department should forever present a majority of two of its members arrayed in hostile and direct opposition to the mayor, who is the head of that so smjil a membefmip as three, the...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 16 September 1905

2 INCIDENTS IN THE LIVES OF NORFOLK PEOPLE. (Article -First.) Those who visited the World’s Fair at Chicago will recall that very attractive body of uniformed attendants known as the “Columbian Guards.” There were about twenty-five hundred of them, and as every member was carefully selected from many thousands of young men who applied for that very pleasant occupation, the result constituted as handsome a body of military as might be found in an extensive, world-wide search. Among the privates in this “Columbian Guard” was Mr. Ned King, who has been for many years a resident of Norfolk and is at present the well known manager of the St. Vincent’s Turkish Baths. Mr. King served throughout the term of the exposition, and is brimful of interesting reminiscences of that great event. Being continuously on the grounds, he became not only thoroughly acquainted with every feature of the Fair, but he also witnessed many humorous and tragic incidents, in some of which he was a participant. It...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 16 September 1905

PORTSMOUTH ITEMS. : OUR PORTSMOUTH DEPARTMENT. : : Conducted by W. T. Pope. : • * The political condition of Norfolk county Is once more In a healthy state; the recent action of tho state committee has placed a quietus upon the Straightout rabble, and it is to be hoped that this gang of incompetent office-seekers will by this time have learned that the good people of Norfolk county do not, and, in fact, will not have them. During the lute county campaign, at an open-air meeting held in South Norfolk, at which meeting the wildest and most incendiary talk was indulged in, the county chairman, Mr. Jones, said that if this election was lost to them (the Siraightouts), that It would be a lifetime before Norfolk county woidd be cleared of fusionism, or words to that effect. Now it is to be hoped that Mr. Jones will feel well assured in his own mind that the people of the county have no confidence in him, and if this party is to exist hereafter it will be much stronger if he would retire t...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 16 September 1905

4 Tfig Free-bance Subscriptions, Payable in Advance. ONE YEAR *1.75 SIX MONTHS »0 THREE MONTHS BO PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY FOR SALE ALL OVER Address all communications to 422 E. Plain Street PROMISCUOUS POLICE SHOOTING. Apart from the unrelenting onslaught of nature, human Jife, health and limb are menaced at every turn by the great machinery of civilization and commercial life. What with 'trolley cars, frenzied horses, falling flower pots, toppling chimneys, and the numerous hazards hostile to our material safety, the wonder is that immunity from death or partial destruction is the portion of any being that passes a lifetime in one of our larger cities. Surely the menace is sufficiently great without having a body of armed men parading the streets who appear to be privileged to shoot indiscriminately upon the very slightest provocation. It may surprise many people to know that in the English cities, far from carrying revolvers, the police are not allowed to carry clubs except at ni...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 16 September 1905

What is the capacity of a Norfolk street car? We have repeatedly tried to solve this problem, but have never yet reached a satisfactory solution. We have been on cars of the Norfolk Railway and Light Company when every available inch of space contained its inch of humanity, and yet the obliging motorman slowed down to take on one or two or three more. Really, this thing of jamming decent people into an almost indecent mass of sweating, struggling creatures who are.paying for the privilege of a ride, has passed beyond all excuse. The enormous business of the Norfolk Railway and Light Company would amply justify them in putting in a plant and sufficient number of cars to properly handle their helpless patrons. In some communities every passenger must Have a seat, and when all the seats are occupied the car does not stop until a vacancy occurs. We have never known a Norfolk street car that did not have “room for one more.” Cut it out! We quote from the Virginian-Pilot: “Another negro f...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 16 September 1905

6 I FAIX WOULD UNBURDEN. “Backward, flow backward, Q tide of the years! I am so weary of toil and of tears; Toil without recompense, tears all in vain; Take them, and Rive me my childhood again!” —Elizabeth A. Allen. Yes, let me unburden and rest in the shade, For far from the fountains my foot-steps have strayed. And darkness is failing and chill is the wind, And hope and ambition were long- left behind. There are vows unfulfilled, and debts all unpaid: I fain would unburden and rest in the shade. I fain would unburden. The way lias been drear; The flowers of spring-time are frosted and sere; The sun of my life is inclined to the West, / The fires of atliietion have left me unblest. My heart is sore heavy with mounds newly made: I fain would unburden and rest in the shade. The seasons still come and the seasons still go With blossomful summers and winters of snow; And I fancy 1 hear in my lone retreat The joyous sounds of returning feet! But no! ’tis a dream that is born but to fad...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 16 September 1905

Iti tfte X&rama's Ifteahn* By Phil. Space. With a revolver in one hcml, a dark lantern in the other and a cigar stuck between his molars, we had “The Millionaire Detective” with us this week at “the cozy little Granby.” And the local Alan Dales said the show was good, and each day during the week we were told that it was still “drawing packed houses,” and all that. Before we proceed with our weekly theatrical sermon, we would hold converse with our local brethren of the quill and inquire why, day after day, after a show opens at the Granby, the same old stuff is run, telling us the show is there. Also we would inquire why, for a week ahead we are told of the bloody, bloody mcllerdrammers that are en route. Why, bless your dear old superannuated souls, couldn’t you sell your valuable space elsewhere? Are the people of this section so densely ignorant and dull of comprehension that they must have it drilled into their kokos that the mellerdrammer is “runnin’”? Avast, there...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 16 September 1905

8 Next week we may be able to tell the public of how The Free-Lance compelled a leading daily of this-city to recognize and pay for talent which for several years it used without a cent of remuneration. We recognized this talent and immediately offered a price therefor, which was accepted, and the work has appeared in these columns. Realizing the absurd and ridiculous light in which they were thereby placed, the dullards now come forward and prohibit their man from further contributions to our columns. We have the consolation of having compelled recognition and payment of talent, and likewise the satisfaction of having scooped the best piece of work their man ever put out. We are not left in the cold, however, because our man Silas Wegg can do a little himself of this kind of humor, and therein lies the saving grace of generosity combined with cleverness. The Police Board held a meeting last Tuesday, at which applicants for the force were put to the test of what is deemed “local fit...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 23 September 1905

Vol. I. No. 27. Sir Thomas Lipton, knight, multi-millionaire, Mogul of the Orient, Mug Hunter and premier yachtsman of the world, at whose command legions of Chinamen, East Indians, West Indians, and sturdy Britishers bend their backs in labor; before whom the titled scions of nobility bow in servile admiration, and whose presence in America prompted a grand rush of society blossoms to dispense their perfume in his presence, has been utterly undone, humiliated, cast down, kicked in the face and otherwise by a plain, matter-of-fact, democratic sorrel nag. Far from our purpose is it to glory in the fall of Sir Thomas, because the genial tea merchant is a plain, blunt man, who spends his money in a style that puts many a prince to shame, and dispenses patronage with democratic simplicity to kings and New York yachtsmen alike. He is a man of means without meanness, and a jolly good fellow, who is generally credited with knowing when he has enough. The old proverb goes, “Seest thou a man...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 23 September 1905

2 fill. Before our special wireless message became obstructed by a dense fog off the Azores, we learned that the sorrel nag became obstreperous right in the presence of the King, threw Sir Thomas clear over her head, walked up and kicked him in the face, and as Lipton tried to rise—landed a blow behind his face below the belt, which according to all rules was a foul. In the shuffle and confusion attending the sad incident, Sir Thomas lost his native dignity right there on the parade ground, a thrifty Scotchman watching for the main chance found it and is holding for a large reward. The Duke of Connaught made light of the matter and showed an unfeeling indifference to the discomfiture of the unhorsed cavalier, feeling doubtless aggrieved that Lipton should monopolize so much attention. Lipton is reported to have held up well under the trying ordeal, and was game to the end, even when the nag’s heels landed there. The report that he swore most horribly lacks confirmation, but he did s...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 23 September 1905

PORTSMOUTH ITEMS. • : OUR PORTSMOUTH DEPARTMENT. : : Conducted by W. T. Pope. : NAVY YARD NEWS. Through the daily papers we learn that the Portsmouth Busiuess Men’s Association, after having made an effort to have the new dry |loek now under construction lengthened, have failed and given up the struggle. We are glad to hear, however, that the Norfolk association has become Interested, taken the matter in hand, and intend to push it. We wish them success in this important matter. On account of the lack of adequate docking facilities this yard is unable to handle the larger class of vessels that are now being built for the navy, and this has resulted in the loss of considerable work to this yard, as the larger the vessel the greater the amount of work and the more men it requires to execute it. With the new dock lengthened we would then have three docks, one for the smaller class of vessels, one for the medium and the capacity of the new dock would be sufficient to hold any of the lar...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 23 September 1905

4 Tfie FrQQ-baflce Subscriptions, Payable in Advance. ONK YEAR »1.75 SIX MONTHS 90 THREE MONTHS 50 PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY FOR SALE ALL OVER Address all communications to 422 E. Plain Street Does the charter of the Norfolk Railway and Right Co. give that concern permission or the rigid to use the public streets for a freight line? Heretofore these loaded freight cars have been operated at night only, hut on Wednesday about noon the Ocean View freight line of tlie Norfolk Railway and Right Co. got into trouble and blocked passenger trallie near the corner of Main and Church streets. The freight train consisted of a large water tank motor ear towing three sand-loaded box cars. The motor developed a hot box and the hot box caused a partial blockade and delay to all the passengers of « the railway company bound down town. We respect fully call the attention of the city councils to the freight Hue of the Norfolk Railway and Right Co. If this concern has the privilege of operating a frei...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 23 September 1905

Some time ago a woman was arrested and given a long jail sentence for beating her step-daughter, whom she claimed was inclined to go wrong and whom she hoped by means of the lash to keep in the straight and narrow path. The local newspapers made a lot of bathos about the poor child and the bruises she had sustained from her “brutal” step-mother. Judging from the number of young girls in this city possessing the knowledge and wickedness of advanced sinners, who roam and do as they please and acknowledge no authority, we are inclined to think that Mrs. Whaley, or whatever was her name, was not far wrong after all. Better a few bruises and stripes upon a girl’s back than a life of shame commenced before childhood is over. In the proper rearing of children we are behind every nation of civilization, and the future mothers of the race are reared in a condition of idleness and moral and spiritual neglect that is appalling. If there ever was a reform needed, it is in the bringing up of chi...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 23 September 1905

6 THE GREAT MISGIVING. w “Not ours,” say Home, “the thought of dentil to dread; Asking' no heaven, we fear no fabled hell: Life is a feast, and we luivc banqueted— Shall not the worms as well?” “The after-silence, when the feast is o'er, And void the places where the minstrels stood, Differs in nought from what hath been before, And is nor ill nor good.” Ah, but the apparition—the dumb sign— The beckoning’ linger bidding me forego The fellowship, the converse anil tin* wine, The songs, the festal glow! And ah, to know not, while with friends I sit, And while the purple joy is passed about, Whether ’tis ampler day tllvlnelier lit Or homeless night without; And whether, stepping forth, my soul shall see New prospects, or fall sheer—a blinded thing— There is, O grave, thy hourly victory, And there, O death, thy sting! —WILLIAM WATSON. DREAMERS. Fools laugh at dreamers, and the dreamers smile In answer, if they any answer make; They know that Saxon Alfred could not bake The oaten cakes,...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 23 September 1905

HOW THE COWBOYS SAW THE CIRCUS. Incidents in the Lives of Norfolk People. (Series Second.) Mr. J. E. Levin, a former trapeze artist, who since retiring from that hazardous occupation has iiccn living in Norfolk, furnishes the' material for our second article under the above caption. “Yes, sir,” said Mr. Levin, “a man who lias been in the business for sixteen years and possesses qualities of observation and retention, gets to be as full of anecdotes and reminiscences as the United States army is of prunes and bean soup. I have traveled with almost every first-class circus in the country, and with many hundreds of theatrical troupes. There isn’t a state of the Union I have not visited, ami hardly a city of any consequence whose pavements my feet have not pressed. “Yes, it gets to lie rather monotonous, and for weeks in the matter of incident one stand is but a repetition of another, hut occasionally something happens to vary the sameness of routine and furnish food for subsequent reco...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Free-Lance — 23 September 1905

8 delighted and their yells of approval could he heard far from the scene of their enjoyment. About the only feature that did not create the usual amount of enthusiasm was the riding by the equestrians of the combination, but it was condescendingly applauded, although several of the cracks among the cowboys did waltz into the ring and show us a few feats witli their wiry little animals. .1 don’t believe a man in that large crowd ever gave a second thought to the admission price of ten dollars paid by each; they had had their fun, their pride had been Mattered in the opportunity afforded to display their eqnitant skill, and they doubtless considered it cheap at the price. As they rode away from the tent many a substantial coin fell at the feet of the women of the troupe, and in a few moments amid mutual cheers and the rattle of pistols they were lost to sight in the dense cloud of dust they left behind them. '‘Yes sir,” concluded my very interesting companion, “I shall never forget t...

Publication Title: Free-Lance, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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