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Elephind.com contains 56,693 items from California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Regulations with regard to Fences. [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

Regulations with regard to Fences. Colusa Co. Dec. 23, 1854. Messrs. Editors : Some months ago I saw a correspondence in your paper, proposing to shut up the stock during certain seasons of the year, or at lease to give each county a right to make its own regulations with regard to fences—but I have heard nothing of the matter since. I think the following extract from Allen's American Agriculture " to be worthy of consideration : "In many countries which have a dense population and little timber, as in China and other parts of Asia, Italy, France, Belgium, Holland, and all other parts of Europe, fences are seldom seen. In certain sections of the older settled portions of the New England States also, a similar arrangement prevails. This is especially the case over the wide interval of bottom land which skirts the Connecticut river, where periodical inundations would anually sweep them away. Wherever this system is adopted, cultivators proceed without obstruction, and a great saving i...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Bounty for Destroying Wild Animals. [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

Bounty for Destroying Wild Animals. We call attention to the valuable communication of J. M. Homer, Esq., one of our earliest and most extensive cultivators. The name of Homer, is identified with the early agriculture of the State, and to him and to E. L. Beard, Esq., the firm of Beard & Homer, were accorded the credit and honor of being the largest and most influential cultivators in California; and we may say that the number of acres they have cultivated and the crops they have raised, have been the largest ever produced by any one firm in the world. We are glad to receive communications from such sources, for it is an assurance that an interest of the right kind'is being felt for agriculture. We trust the appeal to our legislators will be cheerfully met, and not only this subject, but every subject that affects this great interest will receive the prompt attention of our Legislature. We also trust that other large cultivators, those who have interests at stake, will c...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Populousness of China. [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

Populousness of China. Everything relating to China is of moment, and its history is of great importance to us. Let us learn the great features of that mighty and populous nation, and we shall know the character of those that are to be affected and moulded by our institutions. Our institutions and our laws must be kept inviolate, and while we teach obedience to them, we must so exhibit them to this and to every nation, as to win a reverence for them. The tens of thousands, and we may say the hundreds of thousands of the Chinese, that will flock to our country may be influenced for good and become a benefit to the nation, if we will but throw a proper safegnard around our great " bulwark of liberty," our constitution, and the laws necessary to protect and preserve it. We never need fear for our country so long as we are true to it ourselves; and the opening of the vast territories of China and Japan will prove a blessing to us, if we will only seek for the good that is offered by thi...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
To the Readers of the California Farmer. [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

To the Readers of the California Farmer. The annexed communication, with the names attached, has been kindiy tendered to us. We would only ask of our friends to read and judge for themselves, as to the importance of the subject named therein. We are deeply grateful for every testimonial of favor and encouragement in our labors, and we shall speak our mind more fully with the next number, in our "New Year's" wish to them. We shall also add other names which were kindly tendered, and shall be heartily grateful for every approving word and token from every source. — TO THE FRIENDS OF Agriculture, Horticulture, and Floriculture. " Knowledge is a truth nowhere more fully illustrated than in the field of your enterprise ; and on no part of that field more important than in our State. In other States and different climates, the experience of ages is condensed into books; and the son inherits the practical knowledge of his father. Their books are their general guide, and their periodicals c...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
California Wine. [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

California Wine. We desire to keep before our citizens the importance of this subject—this truth cannot be kept out of sight, that the vine is dying out in the old countries. Every steamer brings us more and more confirmation of the statements we have made that California is destined to become a great vine growing country—it may be "the Vineyard of the World," We most earnestly invoke attention to the facts that are constantly being developed touching this important matter. We desire to see the general prevalence of temperance, morality, and universal prosperity, and we feel convinced that the extensive cultivation of the Grape and the manufacture of pure wine will be the cause of the abandonment of dram drinking and the closing of those places that -arc now the haunts of vice, ruin, and degradation. California possesses a soil and climate for the growth of the Grape equal to any country in the world —and we do not hesitate to say, that within ten years, cargoes of wine will be freq...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Grape Blight in Europe. [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

The Grape Blight in Europe. From numerous sources we learn that there is reason to fear an almost total destruction of the vineyards throughout the greater part of middle and southern Europe. The disease spread over the country nearly a month earlier the present season than in any former year, and the grapes being younger, were less able to resist the attacks. A recent correspondent of the Evening Post, under date of London, October 31st, thus writes in regard to the cause of the disease: The first attack I conceive to have been from without, and to have fallen upon the leaves and fruit in the form of very minute and (to the naked eye) invisible sporules or seeds, of a peculiar fungus or mycelium, formerly either unknown to, or not noticed by botanists, perhaps because its blasting and destructive powers were never before called into action. The vine being thus covered with these small fungi, the stomata, or breathing-holes, which are the lungs of the plant, have sucked in the sporu...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
French Gardening Implements-Stone-Labor. [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

French Gardening Implements-Stone-Labor. I sometimes wonder that anything grows in France, the tools used in gardening and in agriculture are so uncouth and unhandy. The hoe, an instrument of constant use, has a handle but two feet long, so that the hoer is obliged to bend into the very earth, in order to reach the object of his care. He thus has his back continually horizontal —a position as laborious and painful as it is degrading, for it gives to a man the appearance of a beast of the field, crawling on all fours. The French spade is even worse. The handle is straight, like the American hoe ; it is not furnished with a hand-piece at the end, which at home is thought to increase its efficiency twofold. The tool is a monstrous misapplication of strength to labor, and, as might be supposed, performs very small days' work. In fact, the spade and the shovel are both one. whereas they ought to be as distinct as poker and tongs. The rake, an ornamental instrument at best, is furnished w...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Autumn Plowing. [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

Autumn Plowing. A correspondent of the New England Farmer says: lam surprised at the remarks of our friend H. S. Perrin. of Orfordville, N. 11., in relation to fall plowing! It appears to me that no farmer, however inexperienced in cultivating the soil of New England, can fail to sec that fall or autumn plowing is a benefit to the soil. In the first place, Mr. P. thinks that one-fifth of the manure applied is lost; this I conceive to be an error in which many persons indulge, but I cannot for my life see how the fertilizing qualities of the manures can escape by the simple process of turning under what remains upon the surface, after the crops are harvested. I find that lands plowed in the fall is not so liable to drought as those plowed in the spring. Fall plowing also serves to destroy those insects which deposit their eggs in the ground, and in the spring rise up by thousands and destroy the crops. If Mr. P. will take two acres of land, side by side, plow one in the fill and the ...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

A Noble Woman.—The following interestin history of Miss Florence Nightingale, an English lady, who has lately gone out with some forty nurses to administer to the comfort and relief of tho wounde d soldiers in the East, is from the London Examiner: — Miss Nightingale is the youngest daughter and presumptive co-heiress of her father, William Shore Nightingale, of Embly-park, Hampshire, and the Lea Hurst, Derbyshire. She is, moreover, a young lady of singular endowments both natural and acquired. In a knowledge of the ancient languages and of the higher branches of mathematics, in general art, science and literature, her attainments are extraordinary. There is scarcely a modern language which she does not understand, and she speaks French, German, and Italian as fluently as her native English. She has visited and studied the various nations of Europe, and has ascended the Nile to its remotest cataract. She has a happy hope, which 6he adorns, and why quit all this to be a nurse 1 Her s...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

Flowers and Perfumery.—Some idea of the importance of perfumery as an article of commerce may be formed, when it is stated that one of the large perfumers of Grasse, in France, employs annually 10,000 lbs. of orange blossoms, 60,000 lbs. of cassic flowers, 54,000 lbs. of violet flowers, 20,000 lbs, of tuberoses, 16.000 lbs, of lilac flowers, besides rosemary, mint, lavender, thyme, lemon, orange, and other odorous plants, in like proportion. Flowers yield perfumes in' all climates, but those growing in the warmer latitudes are, it seems, the most prolific in their odor, while those from the colder are sweeter. Though many of the finest perfumes come from the East Indies, Ceylon, Mexico and Peru, the south of Europe is, the only real garden of utility to the perfumer. Grasse and Nice are the principal seats of the art. From their geographical position, the grower, within comparatively short distances, has at command that change of climate most applicable to bring to perfection the pl...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

The Plains of Chaldea. —Layard says that these plains produce some of the finest fruits in the world. A very delicious peach has lately been introduced into England, which has created a good deal of excitement among nurserymen. The plains, in the spring of the year, are covered with gorgeous flowers. TrufHes grow there in great abundance, and are quite extensively used as an article of food. The hanging gardens of Babylon, Layard says were no fiction. He has found pictured representations of them in his researches.

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POULTRY YARD. [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

POULTRY YARD. To Make Hens Lay Perpetually.—We find the following in an English paper, and transfer it to our paper without vouching for its correctness. Keep no roosters; give the hens fresh meat, chopped up like sausage meat, once a day —a very small portion, say half an oun< a day, to each hen —in winter, or from the time insects disappear in the fall till they appear again in the spring. Never allow any eggs to remain in the nest for what are called nest eggs. When the roosters do not run with the hens and no nest eggs are left in the nest, the hens will not cease laying after the production of twelve or fifteen eggs, as they always do when roosters and nest eggs are allowed, but continue laying perpetually. If the above plan were generally adopted, eggs would be as plenty in winter as in summer. One reason why hens do not lay in winleras freely as in summer is the want of animal food which they get in summer in abundance m the form of insects. New Feed for Sheep.—Whi...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

Mechanics. —Mechanics are the palace builders of the world. Not a stick was hewn, not a stone is shaped, in the all lordly dwellings of the rich, that does not owe its beauty and fitness to the mechanic's skill. The spires that rise their giddy heights among the clouds, depend upon the mechanic's art for strength and symmetry ; the thousands of noble ships that cover the seas of the world; the magnificent steamers that plow the Northern Lakes and Western Rivers; the swift locomotives that traverse through the States with the rapidity of lightning, are all the construction of that noblest of human being —the mechanic. Not an edifice for devotion, for business, for comfort, but bears the impress of their handiwork. How exalting is their calling—how noble their pursuit—how sublime their avocation ! Who dares to sneer at such a fraternity of noble, highminded men 1 Who dares to cast odium on such an eminent and patriotic race ? Their path is one of glory, ambition and honor, and it is t...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

Animal Attachment.—The Alabama Sentinel gives the following remarkable instance of animal attachment: Our young friend and townsman, Robert M. Waddell, informed us the other day of a singular instance of an attachment from a pig to a horse. Mr. Waddell. informed us that while leaving town and going to his work on the Alabama and Mississippi River Railroad, that near the edge of a town a pig some three OT four months old, commenced following him on his horse, and continued to do so until he arrived at home, some twelve miles from town. As he would increase the speed of his horse, so would the litMe squealer increase his speed, and when he arrived at the Cahavvba River and led his horse into the flat, the little pig boldly charged into the flat and took his position between the horse's feet. On arriving at home, and placing the horse in the stable, nothing would satisfy the pig but he must be admitted into the stable too, When he caught his horse and started off again, he shut the bar...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
EXTRACT FROM "THE ANDES." [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

EXTRACT FROM "THE ANDES." AN UNPUBLISHED POEM, BY C. W. B. NO. IV. When first I reached this wondrous Elevation, beyond the height that Humboldt's Daring foot e'er clomb, on Chimborazo, Confused, and dizzy, on the clouded world Beneath, and the unfathomable heavens I gazed, 'till thoughts unutterable, grand And glorioxis, glow'd, star-like, in my heart, And linked my exalted soul, with those Mysterious harmonies, gifted vision Sees, in nature's perfect plan. Standing, as now, upon the mightiest Monuments, that God has built on earth, I think of man —his destiny, his doom. How quick before the breath of Time, his works Are scattered—whilst even the oftspring Of his busy mind, —striving impotent, Against inexorable decay,—become, At last, themselves, their own tomb buildere— As central fires, that heap the lavas up, Are hid, extinguish'd in their very birth. Alas I in air, the eagle leaves no trace ; Nor wounded wave, where pass'd the vessel's keel J The vapor canvas, where the rainbo...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Art of Living with Others. [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

The Art of Living with Others. The fireside jars, the tea-table tempests, and the overy-day laborings in too many family circles, are proofs that the art of living with others is imperfectly understood, and still more imperfectly practiced. The evolutions of patience and temper, the constant manceuverings of affections and jealousy, kindness and coldness, humility and pride, in the miniature precincts of a home, are worthy to be compared to the best examples of military tactics. The heart is ever prone to love, while the mind continually endeavors to assert its own supremacy, and domineer over every mind with which it is brought into contact. Thus arise the thousand differences which disturb the peace of families and wreck the highest hopes of earth. It is idle to argue the possibily of realizing a perfectly' ideal state of social existence, but there is no harm in inquiring whether there are any methods of making the social relations more harmonious than now. For some of the though...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Hard Work. [Newspaper Article] — California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences — 11 January 1855

Hard Work. Mr. A. —" Gocd morning, Mr. B.; I called to to see if you wanted a clerk. I should like to put my son into your store for a while." Mr. B.—" Indeed, I thought you needed him on your farm." " So I do need him—but I don't want my children to have to work as hard as I have to—digging and delving. I tell you it's too hard; I'm fairly worn all out." " Ah ! but you look more hale and hearty than the most of us, and yet you must be quite as old." " Yes, I am turned of 70. But 1 grow lame and stiff, and its all from hard work." " Over 70? And lam but 60, and my partner's younger still —yet see our gray hairs." " Well, well—something in families about that, may be. But do you want ray boy ?" "No sir." "Why not?" " Because you want to put him here to live easy, and he'll be good for nothing, as clerk or merchant either, in that way. We merchants have to work hard if we would gain anything ; and we have to work a great many more hours in a year than you do." "Yes, yes, more hours pe...

Publication Title: California Farmer And Journal Of Useful Sciences
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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