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Title: Creswick Advertiser Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 16,528 items from Creswick Advertiser, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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BOY CAPTAIN IMPEACHED. TOO FOND OF ICE CREAM. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

BOY CAPTAIN IMPEACHED.   TOO FOND OF ICE CREAM. . Asserting that their captain was re- peatedly neglecting his duty by spend- ing too much time in moving picture shows and ice cream stalls with small girl friends and that he always insis- ted on keeping possession of the key to their little headquarters building in the park, some 200 or 300 schoolboys, composing the membership of the New York Boys' Park Protective League re- cently voted to impeach their captain, Moses Rotker.   It was about six months ago that boys, ranging in age from 13 to 16 years who attended a public school not far from Central Park, under the direction of their school principal, formed the Boys' Park Protective League, with the object of aiding the attendants and po- licemen in keeping mischievous boys and grown persons from destroying the sce- nic beauties of the park. "Moe" Rot- ker was made captain of the boy police- men. Park Commissioner Stover gave to the boys the use of a smal...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOUSEHOLD HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

HOUSEHOLD HINTS. The proper way to wash a knitted coat is as follows:—Make a good lat- ther and dip the coat up and down in it till all the dirt is extracted. Then rinse it in warm water (taking care not to wring the coat at all) and put it into a pillowslip. Pin this on to a clothes-line on a dry, windy day, and when the coat is nearly dry take it out and put it on a coat hanger to finish drying. If you stuff a few newspapers in the sleeves they will hang better. Coloured cotton dresses show signs   in time of frequent visits to the wash- tub, and yet, apart from their loss of color, are still quite wearable. The best plan then is to bleach them. It may be accomplished, this way in most cases. Fill a large pan with water, and put in one tablespoonful of cream of tartar to each quart of water. Put in the faded garment, bring the water to boiling point, and let it boil for three hours, stirring it at intervals. Take out the frock, rinse in cold wa- ter, and then hang it ...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RADIUM ON DEATH. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

RADIUM ON DEATH. "Even in an age of wonderful dis-   coveries that announced to-day is well   calculated to astonish the least imagi-   native. It cannot he said that the curative properties of radium are as   yet definitely established, though there   is excellent ground for hope in the   facts cited by Sir Frederick Treves," says the Daily News, "But the mere details of the new discovery are so amazing that the mind staggers at them. "The great barrier to the adapta-   tion of inventions to the service of man has nearly always been the absence of some cheap and effective way of dis- seminating them. What the Radium Institute has done is to make it pos- sible for any country doctor to em- ploy the most expensive known sub- stance in the treatment of his pa- tients at a very moderate cost. It is only necessary to bottle the eman-   ations of the radium—which for cur- &nbsp...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DIFFERENT MAKE-UPS. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

DIFFERENT MAKE-UPS. "All the world's a stage," said Mr. Stormington Barnes.   "Yes" replied Senator Sorghum. "About the only important distinction to be noted is that some of us have to make up our minds instead of our faces."

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PUTTING SPELLS. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

PUTTING SPELLS. Mr, M. T. Lowes, in the "Occult Review," tells some stories about wit- ches. In olden days Welsh witches used to "put spells" on the animals of neighbours who annoyed them. If a cow was the victim it would sicken of no apparent disease, cease to give milk and, if the spell were not remov- ed, would die. The effect of "witch ing" a pig was to cause a curious kind of madness, something like a fit; this again ended fatally unless a coun- ter-charm was forthcoming. Quite rccently I saw one of those "charms" quoted in a local paper by a collector of folk lore. "An old witch living not far from Llangadock (in Carmar- thenshire) ... on one occasion when she had witched a pig, was compelled subsequently to unwitch the animal. She came and put her hand on the pig's back saying 'Duwa'th gadwo i'th berchenog' (God keep thee to thine owner)." Which seems a mild way of calming a frenzied pig. "A noted witch," says Mr. Lewes, "used to live about a mile and a half from my own house...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KEEPING MILK SWEET. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

KEEPING MILK SWEET. An American Agricultural College, in its advice to milk producers, says: —"The souring of milk is caused by the growth of bacteria in it. The fewer the bacteria in the milk, and the slower they grow, the longer will the milk keep. If cleanliness is observed the number of bacteria in new milk will be few. Bacteria double in num- ber in new milk every twenty minutes when it is at blood heat. They grow slowly at 50deg., and not at all at 39 deg. The sooner milk is cooled after being drawn from the cow the longer it will keep. The usual way to handle milk is to set the cans containing it in a trough of cold water and stir occasion- ally until the milk becomes cool. It may be an hour or two before the milk in the centre of the can becomes cool- ed, and all this while the milk-souring bacteria are developing rapidly. It will pay any farmer to buy a cooler. In these machines cold water flows through the interior while the milk flows over the outside, thus being quick- l...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DR. NANSEN'S REMARKABLE VOYAGE. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

DR. NANSEN'S REMARKABLE VOYAGE. "The arrival at Immingham of the Siberian steamer Correct concludes a remarkable voyage, which has not only opened out a new Siberian trade route, but resulted in much scientific re- search," says the Telegraph. "The outward voyage ocupied four years, and the expedition, organised by Mr Jonas Lied, cost £20,000. The round trip was from Tronsoe, Norway to Yenesei River, Siberia, and back, and the Correct brought to Immingham 1500 tons of Siberian produce, com- prising timber, hemp, flax, goatskins, horsehides, bear skins, pigs' bristles, and dead calves, together woth two live camels, two young bears, a wolf, and two deer. On board on the outward journey was Dr Nansen, as expert, together with other distinguished passengers. Dr Nansen left tiie vessel on Septem- ber 3, to go up the river Yenisei, with member of tho Russian Duma, and Russian secretary to the Norwegian Ambassador, in a motor boat placed at their disposal by the Russian Gov- ernment. The ...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TAKEN UNAWARES. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

TAKEN UNAWARES. Thompson and Fairhead met in the street the other day and got talking. "I was on the top of a tram yes- terday," said Thompson, "pulling quietly at my cigar, when suddenly a lady sitting near me snatched it from my month and threw it away. "You've no right to smoke on a tramcar,' she cried. 'It's not al- lowed." "Well, what did you do?" enquired Fred. "I was very much surprised, and in my anger I grasped tho poodle she was carrying in her lap and dropped it overboard. " 'You've no right to carry a dog on a tram-car,' I said. 'It's not al- lowed." "She glared, and then we both looked over into the road, and there was the poodle running along by the sido of the tram; and what do you think it had in its month?" "The cigar?" "No," said Thompson; "it's tongue."

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DIFFICULT EVEN NOW. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

DIFFICULT EVEN NOW. While visiting in the south recently a traveller chanced upon a resident of a sleepy hamlet in Tennessee. "Ara you a native of this town?" "What's that?" "I asked whether you were a na- tive of this place?" Suddenly there appeared at the open door of the cabin the man's wife tall, gaunt, and sallow. Alter carefullly scrutinising the intruder, she said: "Ain't you got no sense a-tall, Ira? He means was you' livin' heah when you was born, or was yo' born after you begun livin' heah. Now answer him."

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FATHER AND SON. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

FATHER AND SON. "The son hasn't the father's brains. The old man could run a shoestring into a tannery any time." "And the son?" "About all he can do is to run an automobile into a telegraph pole."

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A CAT STORY. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

A CAT STORY. Tom was the ninth son of our own marvellously prolific begetter of tab- bies and Toms innumerable. We had gifted him, when quite a wee tot, to our sister-in-law, out about 5 or 6 miles from Dundee. By-and-by, when he had beoome a fine, strapping young hunter, a brother of my wife's took a fancy to him and got him on loan for a voyage to the Arctic regions (oc- cupying several months out and back). Tom's occupation during the voyage was to hunt mice and other lively mem- bers of the crew on board the whaler who had never signed articles nor did any sort of work, and yet expected to and did participate in a share of the vittles. My brother-in-law himself carried Mr Tom (securely packed in a wicker basket with the lid strapped down) all the five or six miles of country roads and lanes, thinly peopled, and much winding in way through the busiest   and most thronged streets of Dundee   to the docks, got aboard, and dump- ed the cat and basket on the...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TORTOISES TO RACE HARES. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

TORTOISES TO RACE HARES. The giant tortoises of the Jardin des Plantes (says the Paris correspon- dent of the "Daily Telegraph" had of late been causing considerable anxiety to their keepers. Instead of peace- fully ruminating and beginning to settle down for their winter sleep, they had become positively frisky, indulg- ing in grotesque gambols. At first it was thought that the Indian summer had stirred their sluggish blood, and they were subjected to a regimen of bromide and other tranquillising drugs but the tortoises got daily livlier in spite of this, and their keeper was at his wits' end, when one evening at dusk, he noticed a venerable old gen- tleman very busy with the invalids. He came nearer, and found that the old gentleman was feeding tortoises out of a syringe, which he inserted in their mouths. The keeper grasped the intruder by the arm, and asked him what he was doing. "Leave me alone," said the old gentleman peevishly. "I'm not doing any harm. I am merely giving the ...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
INFLUENCE OF WATER ON VEGE TATION. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

INFLUENCE OF WATER ON VEGE TATION. To explain the influence of water on vegetation, it is necssary to inquire into its manner of acting upon the various organs of plants. It cer- tainly passes into their substance through the roots. When the roots of a withered, dry, and shrivelled plant are placed in water, it recovers its freshness and vigor, and renews its vegetation. Colored liquor percep- tibley penetrates and rises up through the vessels of the young and white radical fibres, to which it communicate color. Every tree or plant grows or carries out its vegetative functions with more or less vigor in proportion as its roots are less or more furnished with moisture. This water, absorbed by the rootss, passes up through the stems into all parts of the plant. It partly exudes from the leaves, which return to the atmosphere; and the more abundant the production of this transudation, in consequence of the heat and solvent power of the air, so much the greater is the absorption of wate...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IT WAS. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

IT WAS. "Once a friend of mine and I agreed that it would be helpful for each of us to tell the other his faults." "How did it work?" "We haven't spoken for nine years."

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE GOLDEN AGE. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

THE GOLDEN AGE. At twenty Jim set out to find Ajob, the sort he had in mind; He was ambitious—boys should be— And thought, I'll sooner climb a tree By starting near the top—which truth Should be impressed upon our youth. But sad it is to state, the men Who'd jobs to give said, "Call again When you are older , and we'll see— You need experience, dignity." At thirty Jim was trying still To find a job which he could fill,   But now no longer time did waste   In seeking one to suit his taste;   He still preferred the top, but said: "I'll take the foot, if not' the head." "Ahem!" the answer came, "you are Too old to start, too old by far, And yet too young to boss the show— Come back within a year or so." At forty Jim had not yet made The landing he'd so long essayed, The years had thinned his raven hair To call him bald 'twere scarcely   fair),   But brought him wisdom, so that he   Cried, "I'll take anything,...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DRESSING HARNESS. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

DRESSING HARNESS.   For restoring harness or other lea- ther that has become hard and stiff, kerosene emulsion has been found val- uable. It is made as follows:—Take one bar of good strong washing soap, dissolve in a quart of water and bring to boiling. To this add one pint of kerosene oil, and stir, beat, and churn the whole until it combines into a creamy emulsion. Have a tub of warm water, into which pour the emulsion, and in this place the harness and let it soak for some time, and they will come clean very easily. Let it dry a little, until it seems dry on the outside, and then apply the harness oil, either neatsfoot, fish oil, or one of the pre- pared oils like the Eureka. In fixing leather carriage tops it is necessary to wash over several times with the em- ulsion to get it damp enough to oil; then apply the oil as in the harness. Old straps which have become so brit- tle as to crack seriously when bent are restored to their original softness and pliability by t...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A SETTLER. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

A SETTLER. A good story is related of a certain Parliamentary candidate known as a clever speaker and very effective in dealing with a hostile audience. On one occasion, when he had to address a meeting in his constituency, he had no sooner risen and said "Gentlemen," when someone threw an egg at him. Quite unperturbed, he turned to the offender and said—"I was not speaking to you ,sir!" After that he held his audience.

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE OLD HEROINES AND THE NEW. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

THE OLD HEROINES AND THE NEW. As we all know, the Dickens women all play an unimportant second fiddle to the men. Dickens had the good fortune to live in a day when a wo- man's character was more or less a straightforward business, from his nice Florence Dombey to his horrible Mrs. Gamp. No one dreamt of specialising in the complicated mechanism of female temperaments, chiefly because it had not been invented. Your Dickens women present no hysterical problems difficult to comedy. I congratulate myself that someone else, not I, will have to dilate on our Hardy and Mer- edith woman at the coining centenar- ies to be. But we make such rapid strides nowadays that probably, a few years hence, even they will seem no   more than wooden dolls lacking subt-   lety and realism to a new, super-souled   generation. And when we all celebrate   the centenaries of Mr. Shaw and Mr. Galsworthy, what, I wonder, will then be the comment on women that...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A DREAM. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

A DREAM. An Irish peasant dreamt he was vis- iting the late Queen Victoria, and was asked by the Queen what he would like to drink. When he expressed the Humble wish for a glass of the liquor associated with the name of Jameson, and, when the Queen, still full of hos- pitality, wanted to know whether he would take it hot or cold, he was foolish enough to prefer it hot. As the ketthle was not boiling, her Ma- jesty in the dream hastened to make up the fire with her own hands, whilst her thirsty and loyal Irish subject waited anxiously. Alas, when the water came to the boil the noise of the steam awoke him! "I'll take it cold next time!" he said, with infinite regret.

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CRIMES OF OPIUM EATER. CONFESSION OF TWENTY MURDERS. [Newspaper Article] — Creswick Advertiser — 6 January 1914

CRIMES OF OPIUM EATER.   CONFESSION OF TWENTY MURDERS. The amazing confession of how he killed twenty persons in the last four- teen years was made by Harry Spencer, who was arrested at Chicago on a charge of murdering Mrs Mildred Rex- roat, a teacher of the turkey trot and tango dances. Ten of these were wo- men, of whom Spencer said he mar- ried four. His confession, which is the result of eighteen hours under the third degree, is replete with details of his terrible crimes, which he says were committed all over the country between New York and Wisconsin. Spencer is addicted to the use of opium, and the police believe that some of the crimes which he says were committed, exist only in imagination, but Captain Hal- pin, after questioning Spencer until the latter was exhausted, stated that Spen- cer is undoubtedly one of the worst ho- micidal maniacs in the annals of the Chicago police. Spencer says that his murders were committed both to revenge himself on society, and...

Publication Title: Creswick Advertiser
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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