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Elephind.com contains 4,114 items from Direct Action, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Is the I.W.W. to Grow? [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

Is the I. W.W. to Grow? It. seems quite evident rrom recent events both in Australia and N. Zea land, that the craft unions and craft, federations, with their corrupt av.d useless officials, and their narrow out look, are quite unable to fight the bat tles of the membership, and have out lived their usefulness. 13 ? i i. ^..*t-.,^i*st 4i»*3 .r-rnft luiirvns are like so much putty in the hands of professional secretaries, and schem ing politicians who seek to use them as voting machines, and levy-paying organisations, for financing elections. Especially in N.Z. do we see politi cal parties clamoring for union votes, and ..actually having the audacity to ask economic organisations to dip inU their industrial war chest and use their funds in chasing will o' th\ wispa. Even the more radical members a such organisations are now beginning to admit that Arbitration Acts will be all right provided 'they are adminis tered fairly.' Ciaft Unionism breeds systematic organised scabbery, produces...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Persecution of Harry Holland. Gets Twelve Months for Sedition, [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

Persecution of Harry Holland. Gets Twelve Months for Sedition, We notice that tht Citizens' Asso ciation Government has awarded Harry Holland, the editor of the 'Maori Land Worker,' a sentence of twelve months for saying seditious tilings about Laiv and Order, and the paternal Massey Government. Harry is pretty well used by this time to Fat's boarding houses both in Australia and New Zealand, but that does not deter him in the slightest from speaking the truth about exist ing evils. He is, owing to his incarceration of 5 months in Albury Gaol, following the Broken Hill strike, to e,I1 intents and purposes a cripple, having to rely upon a well-worn crutch and a push chair. So aiow he is staying in courageoeus William Massey's private hotel. Whe ther the workers of New Zealand are going to stand this or not is the ques tion. Waiting until next November wd,n 't get him out. Servile deputa tions praying for his release won't get him out. What about a general strike in the coal m/ining c...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

Birect A ction MONTHLY ORGAN Of the INDUSTRIAL WORKERS OF THE WORLD. (Australian Administration). Office:— 330 Castlereagh St., Sydney Australia. 1 EDITOR—' .'.:'??' MANACER— E. A. CIFFNEY, Matter for publication only should bs addressed to the Editor. Other matter to the Manager. ; Subscription, 2/- per year. special Terms on Bundle Orders. HEADQUARTERS I. W.W. (Australia): 330 CASTLEREACH ST., SYDNEY. CENERAL HEADQUARTERS— 164 W. Washington St., Chicago, 111., U.S.A ~

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

Stock Literature Wo have the following literature In 1 stock : — i | One Big Union, An Outline of a Pos- I f sible Industrial Organisation of the Working Class, with chart. By E. A. Trautman. Price 6d. The Rights to be Lazy, Not the right to work, but more of the things j that work creates with leisure to I enjoy them, that is what Intelli- j gent wage workers demand. By I Paul Lafargue. Price 6d. ; .-—_-______—_—___——- — __--—-———— — I On the Firing Line, Report of the | Seventh Annual Convention, on the j McNamara Case, Ettor and Ciov- | annitti Case, The Lawrance Strike, J And what is the I.W.W. Price 3d. The I.W.W It's History, Struoturt, j and Methods By Vicent St. John. 1 Price 3d. i The Revolutionary I.W.W. By C. H. | Perry. Price 3d. I Eleven Blind Leaders, or Practical Soo- j ialism and Revolutionary Tactics. j By B. H. Williams. Price 3d. Direct Action versus Legislation. By J. B. Smith. Price 2d. Industrial Unionism, Aim, Form and Tactics of a workers' Union oir ' I.W.W. ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Royal Commission on Sabotage [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

Royal Commission on Sabotage .Sabotage must be making pro gress despite what politicians say about it. when we find it suggested that there should be nothing less than a Royal Com mission appointed to enquire in to tin? subject. The following is an extract from the, 'New Zealand Dairy man.'' the official organ of that farming fraternity, who acted as strike-breakers hi the late New Zealand strike :? - ? i ?

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LOCAL NOTICE. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

LOCAL NOTICE. Monday Night — Economic Class. Tuesday Night. — Speakers and Reading Class. Wednesday Night. — Lecture in Hall Thursday Night. — Business Meet ing. Friday Night. — Bathurst Street Meeting. Saturday Night. — Bathurst Street Meeting and Parramatta Meeting. Sunday Afternoon. — Meeting in Do maiin. Sunday Night. — Lecture in Hall. Monthly Issue of Direct Action. Up-to-date Library and Reading Room.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CARE OF OUR PRODUCE [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

CARourf Produce 'It seems that it is not only in the holds of the ships that our produce is defiled. It sometimes happens on the railway. Per i...ne tiii« i* (1mn» in revenee for tlu farmers coming to the res cue to keep the ports open. But be this as it may, we have had information given us this week of another awful outrage that was committed on some cheese coming to Wellington for ship ment. Fortunately, the terrible imsinpss was discovered before shipment was made, and the polluted crate of cheese was de stroyed. In this case the injury to the goods may have been done through spite against the proprietor of the factory, but as the cheese was loaded at a flag station, it is evident that some supervision by responsible! per sons is necessary everywhere that our butter and cheese is handled. Pollution of the same kind (this time in regard to butter) was reported to us by a gentleman, who occupies one of the most prominent positions in the dairv industry in the Domin ion. The sooner...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ORGANISATION TACTICS. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

ORGANISATION TACTICS. An organisation of recent appear ance in Australia, known as the In dustrial Workers of the World, al though still young, has made iis pre sence felt among the workers with more virus than the trades unions have been able to do for the yast century. This will be easy to uniur stand when we are acquainted wlih the labour movement of this con rry. Admitting their uselessuess to Jisht the class war on trade union lines (by electing a Labour Party) and ad ditions here rapidly growing worse the workers are asking themselves this question, how is it that va al ways lose our strikes. Our unkms are larger to-day than yesterday. We have a Labor Party and Arbitra tion Courts, Wages Boards. e*c., and wo are s'bill sinking lower and ever lower in the social mire as workers, and then they remember having heard an I.W.W. speaker expxlain the fight ing platform of the Industrial Work ers of the World. Industrial fight ing as against craft union chaos, be ing starved back to w...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Great American "Joker." President Worried, Plute Indifferent. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

The Great American 'Joker.' President Worried, Plute Indifferent. * ? That great America^ philanthropist, John Dough Rockefeller, is in the limelight once again. Presi dent Doctor Wilson, of the United Snakes, has appealed to the Oily Mag nate to do something, as the largest mine owner in the Colorado Fuel and iron Company, where gatnng guns, ar moured trains, militia, thugs pi(nker tons, and all the rest of the riff-raff, are shooting up the miners who desire to make a living wage. John D. Rocky fellow, who, it might be observed, per tinently, is more than largely respon sible for the present Mexican trouble, intimates that he is too busy playing golf to be bothered with such trifles as these. The Wheatland 'murderers,' who never were kinown to carry a gun, Ford and Suhr, are serving their life sentence. Thus far attempts to se cure a new trial have prpved ineffec tive. The I.W.W.s and other rebels in the United States, aje showing every disposition to fight to the bitter end this ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE "ONE BIG UNION" Its Rebellious Origin and Its "Fighting" Future. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

THE ' ONE BIG UNION ' Its Rebellious Origin and Its ' Fighting ' Future. The cry of One Big Union, which first arose from the hearts of the pro pertyless submerged masses of Ame rica a few years ago has since found an echo in many queer recesses. Timid exploiters have whispered it *.o themselves in awe; those more bold have scoffed at its, pretensions and de fied the inevitable, as at Lawrence, Mass., McKees Rocks and elsewhere; churches have denounced it as giving rise to class hatred and class antagon ism; juries alnd judges have tried its protagonists at the bar of capitalist ethics and capitalist law; it has cross ed oceans and continents and given hope and inspiration to erstwhile des perate, despairing millions — all this might have been expected by the en thusiast, but that the cry should find a resting place in the bosom Qf Mr. William Hughes, Labour M.P., and ex Attorney-General of the Australian Commonwealth, is surely something more than the most sanguine ever hoped for. ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Shoe With a Kick. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

The Shoe With a Kick. Once on a time a slave did climb To greater heights than Cabot; Taught unto men, and to their Ken, The beaut? of Ihu Sabot. Of dainty feet sings many an ode. But Sabot now is a la mode. Exploiters all, who hold in thrall, Your destinies and mine, Curse Sabotage and vainly rage, And whine and whine and whine. They know that weapon as their doom — They see the toilers' freedom loom. So see wo then — by word and pen — Impotence in our masters. Our police, our plutes, our prostitutes, Our priests, our press, our pastors, Confess that they are greedy hogs. Now Slaves put on those wooden clogs. Oh! 'Crafty' crafts and kindred 'grafts' Where is, Oh! where thy sting? A.W., yes unto you, Of Sabotage I'll sing: A Sabot is a wooden shoe; You'd wear one if you only knevt. You A.M. A., who sometimes play At striking for more money; You U.L.U. and B.L.U. Are equally as funny. For every time you strike you lose, Why not then buy some wooden shoes ? You Building Trades, of var...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Humans and Cattle Oxen May Loiter But Man Must Work. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

Humans and Cattle Oxen May Loiter But Man Must Work. There were three of them. Swag gies. It was more than hot. It was in Northern Queensland. Summer time, too. Hundred and a few odd units in the ice-box. It was Hell'. No shade, no water, no nothing. They glimpsed a shimmering soine tfiing in the distance, dancing on the drab landscape. It was a branch railway line doing the tango. The trio made it. They discovered a bridge, spanning a gully. There was shade— grateful, refreshing shade. But, alas, there were also cattle — panting for relief. The human 'cattle' vanquished the bovines. Shortly arrived the perspiring and spluttering minion o£ the law, flour ishing a young cannon. 'Here! Here! You fellows, go and find your shade somewhere else. This is for the cattle.' Moral: Cattle are saleable; the labor market is overstocked.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO. 'Society in every State is a blessing, bui government, oven in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one. The trade of governing has always been monopo lised by the most ignorant, and the most rascally individuals ef mankind.' —THOMAS PAINE.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN EXPOSURE OF THE SUCCESS OF CAPITALISM. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

AN EXPOSURE OF THE SUCCESS. OF CAPITALISM. How sad a task it is ;for a conscious member of -the human family to think of. let alone give expression to the cruel laws that governs the success of the industrial despots. Success in the present epoch mani fests itself in the form of a vast col lection of commodities for which the owners have no use on the one hand, and poverty, want, starvation, mis ery, hunger, squalor, crime and de gradation on the other. Working men and women, and sometimes children, make life with all its wonders, and aggrandisements possible, and receive in return for their indispensable services the bare necessities of life, in order to prevent the human machine from wearing out too soon, while the masters of indus try who are absolutely useless to so ciety, receive, or I should say, appro priate, all the grand things that the muscular and mental powers of the workers have produced. This state of things is wrong. Canny and subtle as the masters claim to be, they d...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SAYS "FAX." [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

SAYS 'FAX.' It is action, not argument, that set tles problems, Much argument means little action. An ounce of action is worth a ton of philosophy. 11 - 11 out ana oe convinced. Philosophy is out of place until ac tion has wo-i the day. There is a vast difference between discussion and argument. Discussion promotes action. Argument destroys action. We discuss jo find a common ground for action. We argue to establish our individual ideas. Men of experience discuss their pro blems. Fools argue. Dc/n't be a fool! * * * THE GAMUT OF THEFT. Taking £1.000,000 is called Genius. Taking £100,000 is called Shortage. Taking £50,000 is called Litigation. Taking £25,000 is called Insolvency. Taking £10,000 is called Irregular ity. Taking £5,000 is called Defalcation. Takiing £1,000 is called Corruption. Taking £500 is called Embezzle ment. Taking £100 is called Dishonest}'. Taking £50 is called Stealing. . .Taking £i is called Total Depravity. Takinig a loaf is called War on So ciety. —'Exchange...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE INDUSTRIAL LABOUR MOVEMENT. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

THE INDUSTRIAL LABOUR MOVEMENT. The working class constitute eighty five per cent, of the earths popula tion, consequently we have a large majority, and the power, if organised on class lines industrially. Only by industrial power can we gain Indus trial Freedom for our class with rinse organisation, revolutionary educa tion and quick unity of action can economic liberty be attained. The I.W.W. promises the only way out. Organising on the job into industrial unions, as against craft unions, brings the workers into the social un derstanding of future ownership of the industries, with the itechnical knowledge of their respective jobs, the workers are prepared to become masters of their own destiny, are rearing the structure of the industrial Commonwealth around the machines of the world, and so will be able to carry on production after capitalism shall have been overthrown. Exploitation begins were we work. Organize where we work, and stop ex ploitation by raising wages and short enin...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LOCK-OUT OR HOLIDAY. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

LOCK-OUT OR HOLIDAY. Once more Easter has come and departed, and the producers oif all the 'good things' of life have been grant ed a few days holiday (I don't think) to recuperate their energies ifor the ensuing twelve- months of capitalistic exploitation. The influx of fellow workers from the country, being as great, if not greater, than the prev ious excursion— they have been away many of them in the tropical heat of summer, amongst the tall timbers, chopping and clearing a way for their masters to still further enmesh them in the tentacles of the capitalistic class. Perhaps quite a number of them had succeeded in saving a (few shillings, and a great number of them never had at chance, because master class could not see their way clear to make enough surplus value out of their sun-tanned hides, hence no pro fits, no employment, no holiday in Sydney; .truly the boss Is a good, kind and noble friend to the workers — of course those wage slaves who were fortunate enough to have the ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO THE SYDNEY TRAMWAY MEN. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

TO THE SYDNEY TRAMWAY MEN. Probably Mr. Tramwayman, you are aware that you work under iworse conditions than any other tramway employees in Australasia. Now iin Auckland, N.Z., spare list or casual conductors get a guarantee of eight hours a day, and tnat eight hours must be worked within thirteen hours. All time worked over eight and a hallf hours is paid for art time and a half rates. You get no guar antee, and only time and a quarter for Sunday work. You risk your lives hanging on the footboards, grabbing fares, whilst in Auckland and other places the conductor goes down the centre of the car, which is much com fortable, and much safer. You are subjected to a system of espionage and governmental pimping by a gang of officials who mostly got their jobs as a reward for scabbery and treach ery during time of trouble. You are putting up with bad condi tions, (wretched pay and continual harassing that no other bunch of trarawaymen in Australasia would stand. Anyway, you are learning b...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"THE MAN WITH THE HOE." [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

'THE MAN WITH THE HOE.' Edward Markham's immcrtal poem is beginning to be appreciated as its truths and prophecies become daily consummated through the uprisings and revolts of the rural workers in various parts of the world. 'How will it fare with kingdoms when the whirl winds of rebellion shake the earth?'' he asks. An inkling of what is likely to happen was shown in the recent strike of school teachers and scholars in the country schools of Hereford shire, England. For centuries the rustic of England has been the butt of jokers, who have brightly laugh edat his servility and cringing humility to the squire and the gentry. Cap in hand, in the past, he has rushed to open the gate for the squire, and pull his forelock, as a threepenny bit is haughtily flung to him. His only joy was a pot of beer taken at a vil lage tavern, over which he would guf faw until the stroke of 9 o'clock. But capitalism lias introduced emi gration schemes, the children of these forbears are beginning to rov...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
South Australian Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 1 May 1914

South Australian Notes, A resolution was carried by the Storemen and Packers' Union re questing its members to entice all clerks in warehouses to join the Clerks' Union. Evidently the power behind One Big Union has not yet become apparent to these scissor bills. At the burial service of the V.L.V. £20 was donated to opportunist Mur phy for 'services rendered' Surely an admission of ignorance and inact ivity of the rank and file, when one official is thus honored. Or, perhaps, he did not receive any salary for ser vices rendered. 'Dick Un.' The Plasterers indulged in a sham fight for a few days, but owing to the State industrial laws, cowardly de nied their action, and ran back to work. Fancy such a thing as law be ing used, if the building industry was organised on the lines of the I.W.W. It would be a huge joke. By the way, some men talk of the I.W.W. form of organising as being one hundred years before its time. It's a pity these individuals were not alive to say this one hundred ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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